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Thread: The sequential fishing day

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    Member Micky_Ireland's Avatar
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    Default The sequential fishing day

    Am I right in assuming that a lot of boat captains leave port at around 5-5.30am to coincide with the first tide and change ( low if possible and preferable with the low light )? . Following this, is this period then fished until the flood commences ( or vice versa ) and then a change of species is targeted i.e. halibut , rockfish to carry through to the next tide change. It would appear that the tides would then probably dictate the fishing day or at least the optimum times for productivity Is. this correct?

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    You've got it.

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    I think Micky's question is the same as mine so instead of starting a new thread, I'll basically ask the same question here. I'm going to be in Elfin Cove area Sept2-Sep6. The tides will be low 6am'ish peaking back up to high at Noon, then back down. My plan was to go out and Salmon troll/mooch until 11:30ish and then go Halibut Hunting as tide is rising and almost at slack. Is this a sound plan?

    By the way, this is a great little tide chart site that I used: http://www.ezfshn.com/tides/usa/alas...september/2013

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by UbanUte View Post
    My plan was to go out and Salmon troll/mooch until 11:30ish and then go Halibut Hunting as tide is rising and almost at slack. Is this a sound plan?
    Yep...pretty much. I usually fish for butt around two hours before slack, to two hours after....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Member carolinaboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by UbanUte View Post
    I think Micky's question is the same as mine so instead of starting a new thread, I'll basically ask the same question here. I'm going to be in Elfin Cove area Sept2-Sep6. The tides will be low 6am'ish peaking back up to high at Noon, then back down. My plan was to go out and Salmon troll/mooch until 11:30ish and then go Halibut Hunting as tide is rising and almost at slack. Is this a sound plan?

    By the way, this is a great little tide chart site that I used: http://www.ezfshn.com/tides/usa/alas...september/2013

    Hey UbanUte,

    Let us know how that worked out. I fished Excursion Inlet/Icy Straits area two years back and came very close to booking with one of the lodges at Elfin Cove. Nearly flipped a coin on the decision.

    This year I'm back to POW as usual.

    Sorry to step on OP toes with the slight-jack of the thread.

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    Member redleader's Avatar
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    everything revolves around the tide, we left the dock at 7 yesterday, hit the 8:30 slack anchored up and got most of our halibut, when the tide made it too tough to bottom fished we started trolling for salmon and when we were almost limited out shut it down and jigged up the last few halibut and salmon. Made it back to the harbor by noon with 12 halibut and 12 kings. Micky, you can learn a lot off the Internet and studying but the best way to learn is just to go fishing.

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    You guys got it, fish the slack tide (2 hrs) for butts and in the mean time target salmon & rock fish.

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    Member AKCAPT's Avatar
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    really?? Fish the slack tide for halibut?? you'll go hungry in Seward doing that.....

    Learn something every day......

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    Member akfisherman's Avatar
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    I agree your wasting your time and fighting the current outside of slack tide. I try to hit it so that I am just before slack tide and fish through the slack till I start having trouble staying on the bottom. Some people swear that high slack is better but I have done well on low slack too.
    What are ya...a fisherman...or a catcherman?

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKCAPT View Post
    really?? Fish the slack tide for halibut?? you'll go hungry in Seward doing that.....

    Learn something every day......
    same/same down here. Slack tide is the kiss of death (or lunch time) when halibut fishing.

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    Member AKCAPT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 270ti View Post
    same/same down here. Slack tide is the kiss of death (or lunch time) when halibut fishing.
    I am not sure why it is different in Cook Inlet, except that maybe when the tide is ripping it is too strong.

    There is no doubt in Seward, though.....

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    The moving tide gets the scent moving and "calls in" the fish, correct? Seems like the bigger tides would carry the scent further and bring in more fish, is that a correct assumption?

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    Member AKCAPT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AaronP View Post
    The moving tide gets the scent moving and "calls in" the fish, correct? Seems like the bigger tides would carry the scent further and bring in more fish, is that a correct assumption?
    I believe halibut are ambush predators and they use their shape - like a stealth fighter - to use the current to their advantage in terms of attacking prey. The current moves the scent and the halibut can cruise the current a few feet above the bottom looking for lunch.

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    I've seen it go both ways for halibut. I'll be fishing a spot for a while during the ebb or flood and nothing. The tide slacks up and, boom, non stop action. Conversely, I've had a great bite during and ebb or flood. Slack arrives and the bite goes dead. I can't figure it out.

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    Charterboat Operator
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKCAPT View Post
    I am not sure why it is different in Cook Inlet, except that maybe when the tide is ripping it is too strong.

    There is no doubt in Seward, though.....
    The halibut are there during the running part of the tide and many days you can fish the whole tide, BUT its the days you have got to use an OPTIMAX to keep bait anywhere near the bottom, that deter fishing thru the tide. I gave up this year and got rid of all my 6# weights, when the 5# start walking away from you its time to run. Man it would be fun to have constant 4-10 foot tides in the Cook...

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    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AaronP View Post
    The moving tide gets the scent moving and "calls in" the fish, correct? Seems like the bigger tides would carry the scent further and bring in more fish, is that a correct assumption?
    Yes that's a fair assumption... however, when the tide "gets to rippin" your weight is not going to lay (stay) on the bottom, the tension of the water against your line is going to float that weight like it was a kite.. meanwhile the 'butts' are hugging the bottom...!

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    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKCAPT View Post
    I believe halibut are ambush predators and they use their shape - like a stealth fighter - to use the current to their advantage in terms of attacking prey. The current moves the scent and the halibut can cruise the current a few feet above the bottom looking for lunch.
    I agree 110%. so many times out in the middle of Cook Inlet, you can find a really nice looking "bump" anchor up current from it and try to get your baits hanging down in close on the lee side, and most often you'll enjoy a very good bite.. til the tide changes, and your hooks are hanging down too far away from the "bump"...

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Old John View Post
    I agree 110%. so many times out in the middle of Cook Inlet, you can find a really nice looking "bump" anchor up current from it and try to get your baits hanging down in close on the lee side, and most often you'll enjoy a very good bite.. til the tide changes, and your hooks are hanging down too far away from the "bump"...
    If you are at anchor, those fish are coming from a good distance to grab those baits. As the tide changes, you basically start all over and have to start chumming in the opposite direction.

    If you anchor in the right spot, a 30-50 minute slowdown is to be expected during a tide change.. sometimes longer. When you are trying to get it all done in 2-3 hours, you better get on anchor at the beginning or middle of a tide and make sure it's flowing to the halibut.

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by POLE BENDER View Post
    The halibut are there during the running part of the tide and many days you can fish the whole tide, BUT its the days you have got to use an OPTIMAX to keep bait anywhere near the bottom, that deter fishing thru the tide. I gave up this year and got rid of all my 6# weights, when the 5# start walking away from you its time to run. Man it would be fun to have constant 4-10 foot tides in the Cook...
    dang, that's hardcore.. I use 3# max... and prefer 1 or 2#. On our biggest tides.. around 11ft, and I'm off the beach catching the brunt of the main tide flow, even 3# can have a 45 degree angle on it. I've got a few spots in narrow openings between islands that even a modest tide will make a 3# weight tough to keep on the bottom.

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    Member AKCAPT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 270ti View Post
    dang, that's hardcore.. I use 3# max... and prefer 1 or 2#. On our biggest tides.. around 11ft, and I'm off the beach catching the brunt of the main tide flow, even 3# can have a 45 degree angle on it. I've got a few spots in narrow openings between islands that even a modest tide will make a 3# weight tough to keep on the bottom.
    I think that is the difference. I have similar conditions to 270ti and can't catch ***** on the slack. Less current swept areas fish better on larger tides.

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