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Thread: Stock Repair

  1. #1
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    Default Stock Repair

    I have a vintage, 1947 Winchester Model 24 SxS on which I have damaged the stock, and I am absolutely heartbroke over it.

    In a moment of carelessness, I left the soft side gun case partially unzipped when I put the gun behind the seat of the truck. Two days later, when removing the gun fro the truck, the gun slid out of the case and landed on the butt plate. A chip of wood, about 1-2" long and 1/2" wide chipped off the stock starting right at the corner where the bottom of the stock meets the plastic butt plate. (Thank GOD the butt plate didn't get damaged.

    I still have the chip, and it fits in its old place fairly decent. I spent some time at Home Despots today looking at wood glues and other adhesives. There are a LOT of choices to pick from, even after eliminating all of the ones that say "not for moist or wet exposure." So, I'm wondering what have people used in the past for a similar repair? I hope to be able to simply glue the chip back into place. There's an Elmer's wood glue for outdoor wood, another brand I forget the name, Quick Wood (a product similar to FastSteel) as well as a multitude of LocTite brand 2 part epoxies for multiple material types.

    Has anyone done this with success, and what would you recommend?

    Lastly, after the glue dries, how do you deal with the new line and the visible glue? If I sand it, it's going to sand the original finish off in the surrounding area as well. I know I'll never get a finish to match the rest of the stock, and I don't want to refinish the stock because refinishing anything in the vintage Winchester world is absolute no-no in regards to condition rating and value. (I know, too late now, I've dropped on the concrete, duh.) Anyway, I'm all ears.

  2. #2
    Member gunbugs's Avatar
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    Do not use any of the "wood glues" available at the hardware store. Use acra-glas epoxy bedding compound. Dye it brown. Once you have put epoxy on both parts of the repair area, use bar clamps to compress it into place. While the epoxy is still wet, wipe the excess off with a cloth and some solvent. I like brake cleaner myself. Let it set up overnight. Should be done.
    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

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    Hey thanks, gunbugs. How do I, or what do I use to, dye the resin?

  4. #4

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    acra-glas is the way to go with this kind of repair. you can buy a small kit from brownells or maybe a local gun shop. the dye is in the kit you can make it any shade you want. some people install recoil pads for this reason.

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    Awesome, so which version do I buy? There is a gel and an original. The gel looks to be easier to apply, but I don't think it comes with any dyes. The "original" seems to be a complete kit with dye and everything. Is htere any reason I should buy one over the other? Also, I noticed a note on the Brownell's site about it being a hazmat product requiring special ground only shipping. There is a version of each type of kit marked "non-flammable" that does not have the hazmat shipping note. I'm guessing I should be buying the non-flammable one?

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    The old line master cabinet makers used hide glue exclusively. Seemed to work for them, and it has worked for me.

  7. #7
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    I use the very thinnest variety of cyanoacrylate ("super glue") which penetrates the wood pores and then I instantly cure it with an accelerator ("zip kicker"). Sand slightly, seal with varnish or oil as per the original finish, and you can't tell that anything happened. This adhesive has no dimension, unlike most glues such as epoxies or wood glues.

  8. #8
    Member gunbugs's Avatar
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    Both acra-glas kits come with dye. The "non-flammable" kits have a water base release compound VS. alcohol base for the "flammable" kits. The standard non-gel kit is pretty good for your type of repair, as it is runny and will compress in the break very well.
    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

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