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Thread: POW Halibut fishing

  1. #1
    Member Micky_Ireland's Avatar
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    Default POW Halibut fishing

    What's the story with the halibut fishing around the islands? I have read many narratives stating that the SE has some of the best halibut fishing in the world. Is this correct? It is clear that the SE has arguably the best salmon fishing in the world however some people believe as a result of this the halibut is not nearly fished as much or at least get the proper recognition they deserve down there. Is the halibut fishery one of the best kept secrets of the SE?................................THANKS FROM IRELAND

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    These aren't the halibut you're looking for. You can go about your business. Move along.

  3. #3
    Member carolinaboy's Avatar
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    Only big brown and white flat salmon in that area. And way too many!
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  4. #4

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    Most guides catch babies, and erroneously call them "chickens". A 12lb halibut is not a chicken, IMO. Good halibut are to be found, but it takes a lot of hard work and dedication to consistently bring in good scores. It's very hard earned info, that isn't given out freely.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 270ti View Post
    Most guides catch babies, and erroneously call them "chickens". A 12lb halibut is not a chicken, IMO. Good halibut are to be found, but it takes a lot of hard work and dedication to consistently bring in good scores. It's very hard earned info, that isn't given out freely.
    Now I'm curious - what size range would you call a 'chicken' halibut?

  6. #6

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    Traditionally, a chicken halibut is about 25-50lbs. They were a very acceptable fish, and thus a load of "chickens" was a decent load of halibut. The good eaters!

    Now, they took the name "chicken", and moved it down to u32 fish (or slightly over), and called them the "good eaters", to justify bringing in babies. It's pretty funny actually, that guides convince clients that a 12lb halibut is better eating than a 30lb halibut.

    I hear guides on the radio sitting out in the ping pong paddle patch, saying "we are out getting chickens". Nope. They are getting u32 fish. That's fine if they do that, as it doesn't really damage the resource at all... but just be accurate about it.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by 270ti View Post
    Traditionally, a chicken halibut is about 25-50lbs. They were a very acceptable fish, and thus a load of "chickens" was a decent load of halibut. The good eaters!

    Now, they took the name "chicken", and moved it down to u32 fish (or slightly over), and called them the "good eaters", to justify bringing in babies. It's pretty funny actually, that guides convince clients that a 12lb halibut is better eating than a 30lb halibut.
    Good to know; I've gotten accustomed to the guides in Ketchikan referring to the 10-20# halibut as 'chickens'.

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