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Thread: Cold Water and Fast Current

  1. #1
    Member Buck Nelson's Avatar
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    Default Cold Water and Fast Current

    I have been dipnetting at Chitina only once. We lucked out and had great fishing. I was really struck at how potentially dangerous the situation was, however. The shuttle dropped us at a great spot just above a cliff. In my opinion, it was a recipe for disaster! Steep, slippery, wet rocks; excited fisherman, fast current, cold water, and cliffs that would keep you from getting out immediately if you fell in and pretty much prevent your fishing partner(s) from helping you if you did fall in.

    Luckily old dipnetting veterans had told us to bring a long rope, so we tied off and wore life jackets. I shudder to think about anyone fishing a spot like that without being tied off. Sure was a whole lot of fun, though, and provided many good meals.

  2. #2
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    Our families friend who dips there brings his climbing gear and rappels into his hole, sounds like fun to me but scary and dangerous to someone who doesn't know what he's doing.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  3. #3

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    One of the dangers of the Copper river are the holes that the river cuts near sand bars. I always push the hoop of the net along the bottom in front of me when walking in the water. I have seen more than one person step in a hole and get wet, and one person that stepped in a hole and ended up getting picked out of the water about 100 yars downstream, luckily the boat that picked him out of the water was only 20' away when he fell.

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    Default Dipnetting dangers...

    I bet this would work well on the river; a regular throw bag would work too! http://www.life-safer.com/ Mike

  5. #5

    Default The hard part

    Quote Originally Posted by ak_powder_monkey View Post
    Our families friend who dips there brings his climbing gear and rappels into his hole, sounds like fun to me but scary and dangerous to someone who doesn't know what he's doing.
    would be rapelling OUT with 300 pounds of fish!
    Hike faster. I hear banjo music.

  6. #6
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    I remember the last time I dipped the Copper. I was working in Glennallen at pump station 11. Drove out after dinner, started fishing at 9pm, and by midnight I had 26 reds and one king. Took me another 2 hours to clean the fish and pack them up the slope to my truck. I was one tired puppy driving back, so tired that I pulled over and slept in my truck for a couple of hours.

    I love dipping the Copper, nothing quite like it, and yes it is a wild and potentially dangerous place. The spot I fished had a steep slope to descend, but fairly flat at the waters edge.

  7. #7
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildog View Post
    would be rapelling OUT with 300 pounds of fish!

    nah you tie the cooler with 300 pounds of fish to the bottom of your rope, jug up the rope (prussic or ascender) then a simple 3:1 z pully and the fish come up in no time. Crevasse rescue classes can come in handy for more reasons then one
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  8. #8
    Member Adventures's Avatar
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    Default rocks

    you guys on the rocks are nuts. We bring the boat! the last two years we went we limited out in 4 hours of total netting (that's not including the cleaning time as we pick out 15-20 and then go clean them and get them on ice and then go back for more.
    couple years ago we saw a couple guy right in the middle of the gorge on a big rock with no way to get to actual land and not much room to walk around let alone put your fish. must have gotten dropped by the charter
    Justin

  9. #9
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    Default Nuts?...

    Nah...Fishing the rocks and banks are where it's at. Like was said above...it's the potential danger and the thrill that gets you hooked. Plus if it weren't for us Rock Fisherman....Who would you boat boys have to make fun of ? or who would stand on a slick ***** rock and envy you? I'm thinking...who in there right mind would want to run a boat on that crazy river....Now that's nuts!

    Here's my delema (looking for suggestions from the Innovation crew...AKA "pulley crew" ) Everytime I go out with my crew we can never seem to have a good system for stringing fish and tying them off. Somehow we always end up with two stringers rapped together (and a heavy King on the end). Then the charter pulls up and we're a mess. HELP! Would it be better to try to clean as you go? Is there a rule, law, regulation, wives tale about that somewhere? Thanks!

    H

  10. #10

    Default You make it sound easy

    Quote Originally Posted by ak_powder_monkey View Post
    nah you tie the cooler with 300 pounds of fish to the bottom of your rope, jug up the rope (prussic or ascender) then a simple 3:1 z pully and the fish come up in no time. Crevasse rescue classes can come in handy for more reasons then one
    I visualize raining reds from above when the cooler breaks open from 75 feet.
    "Splat, splat, splat!"
    It would be like an old episode of David Letterman!
    Hike faster. I hear banjo music.

  11. #11
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    they might not use a cooler that would be amusing but kinda sad (wasted fish sucks)
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  12. #12
    Member Ronster's Avatar
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    Default

    We always used trash compacter bags at the rivers edge. Once the fish were cleaned, we haul them up to the camp/ truck and put them in the cooler. We cleaned as we went along (usually 3 fishing and 1 cleaning).

    We ran the river last year in a friends boat, and that was the ride of a lifetime. I think he still has pucker marks in that seat cushion

  13. #13
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    25 years 30+ trips, we put our fish in burlap sacks, they stay moist and cool until you get to the cleaning table or on level ground. Fished most years from a boat and always felt safest in an inflatable although it's hard to drift if windy. Also if you drift, plan to lose a net or two. Never tie yourself to your net. Nothing beats common sense on that river, I've seen boats go under, and people fall in. WEAR your PFD at all times, at least then they might find your body. It's not the place to bring small kids. It's crazy we residence have to risk our lives to feed our families. No alcohol, Be safe, good fishing..

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