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Thread: ??? Barn door Halibut bait ???

  1. #1
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    Default ??? Barn door Halibut bait ???

    I am headed out to fish for Halibut this weekend which will be my 3rd time this year. I have caught plenty 15-30lbs Halibut but before I leave Alaska I would like to catch atleast one over 100+lbs. I will be fishing out of Seward. My question is what would be the best bait to increase my chances of catching something bigger than 30lbs?

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Put a salmon head on and raise it off the bottom about 8-10 ft.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    and drop that line near wessels reef

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    Anchor, and be ready for one hellava wait. If you can, score some pink salmon for bait (very fresh and bloody). Catch some silvers and use the guts to "supplement" your bait on the circle hook. It's all about scent..

    If looking for (1) big fish, don't be afraid to anchor in some shallow reefy stuff off of points and in tide rips. Just make sure you can get your anchor back. Send your scent over some rocky/hard areas that guys don't traditionally fish for halibut. It's a grind for the bigger ones, but worth it in the end.

    Good Luck.

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    thanks for the info

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    Member TWB's Avatar
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    Just out of curiosity but why target "barn door" halibut, outside of bragging rights.

    They are breeders. There's already a steady decline going on a decade and fish are smaller at age.
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

  7. #7

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    I'd hardly consider a 100lb halibut barn door. I'd say 200+ are barn doors. You get some good eating out of those 100-150lb fish. If you just take 1 of those mommas a season, good on you.

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    Member TWB's Avatar
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    True. I understand its impossible to stop a lunker from the bite. 100 and under is the range I shoot for.

    But I don't go out using big gear that prohibits the smaller fish from the bite.

    Just sayin.
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

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    To catch a barn door halibut I usually put a tourist on a large circle hook with a large weight. Works every time.

  10. #10

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    Put down a Sardine wrapped K16 Kwikfish or a live Pink Salmon and see what happens!
    Piscor Ergo Sum

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    Member tlingitwarrior's Avatar
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    Biggest halibut I have caught have always been in water shallower that 200 feet and most in 150 to 80. My largest on sport gear was at just under 300lbs was on a perfect ling cod pinnacle at 160 feet just north of shuyak island. Agree 100% with 270ti on risk/reward of fishing the rocks for the big ones.

    i love soaking a humpy head, either whole head or one split in half down the lateral line. Another trick I like is soaking an oil absorbent pad in herring oil and using as chum bag. Or use a "feminine product" in the same manner.
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  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Franken Fish View Post
    Put down a Sardine wrapped K16 Kwikfish or a live Pink Salmon and see what happens!
    Franken Fish...dumb *** question # 631...Are sardines and herring two different fish? And if so, why would one be favored over the other in any particular application? I've always wondered but have never remembered to ask when I'm around experienced fishermen who would know.

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Garyak View Post
    dumb *** question # 631...Are sardines and herring two different fish?
    Here, let me Google that for ya...
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  14. #14

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    Yes they are different. Sardines are in the herring family though. Sardines and Herring I believe share the same Genus. Sardines tend to be a little more oily which is important when setting up a scent slick for Halibut.
    Piscor Ergo Sum

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    Quote Originally Posted by Garyak View Post
    Franken Fish...dumb *** question # 631...Are sardines and herring two different fish? And if so, why would one be favored over the other in any particular application? I've always wondered but have never remembered to ask when I'm around experienced fishermen who would know.
    "Sardine" is more a marketing description than a species name, but in a nutshell, all sardines are herring, while not all herring are sardines. Some herring are pilchards, and others are too large or small to fit properly in a sardine tin. There are over a dozen tyes of herring that may be called 'sardines' for marketing purposes when canned.

    The live "sardines" we use for bait down off the coast of Southern California are really just herring, not meaningfully different from the frozen herring y'all sell up there as bait.

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