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Thread: Is UHMW really this Slickery or is it Video Trickery?

  1. #1

    Default Is UHMW really this Slickery or is it Video Trickery?

    Yes, I just came up with that word, if Robert Service can make up his own word "marge", I can create slickery.

    Now onto the subject at hand. This video shows a UHMW jet boat going across a gravel bar for quite a ways. It appears it was shot in either early spring or late fall? It is almost hard to believe that it has that low of a coefficient of friction on that bar. At first I thought that gravel bar was solid ice, but if you look at the stern it appears it is kicking up the gravel, plus there is no ice / snow at that point in the video.

    I posted this on the canoeing forum because I know mainer & possibly others are using that on the bottoms of their freight canoes to make way thru rock gardens and dragging in shallow water. Is this stuff really this slickery?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=phF9E8ACnPc

  2. #2
    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    wow, burning 150 gallons of fuel never looked so fun. yip, sure is good stuff.

  3. #3

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    I used it on the bottom of a wood drift boat for years and it is very "slickery." Also great for sliding logs. It "moves" a lot which isn't so great on the hull of a wood boat where it's screwed into place. Some of the spray on liners with the correct low friction formulation are almost as slickery. I believe Line-X has some formulations that work well for hull bottoms.

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    UHMW is the plastic generally used for the beds of toboggan-style dogsleds. it is tough and slippery. In making lightweight sleds, I've used it as thin as .0625. You can make a better than passable sno-go freight sled from a sheet of 48" wide x length you need of 0.250 UHMW. (No recycled, only "virgin".) Don't know much about it on boat bottoms, other than runner strips. Excellent material. Commercially used for cutting boards.

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    ran into a guy on the 20 mile launch. he had the 1/4" uhmw riveted to the bottom of his jet hull. I'm not a fan of rivets though. his bilge pump continued pumping water out of his boat for at least at least 30 minutes. I talked to him for a good 20 minutes while he bilged the boat. He must have taken on over 200 gallons of water through those leaky rivits. it was a brand new boat.

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    UHMW has been used on the bottom of AIR BOATS for a long time very slick if you don't roap it to a large log it will slip on an incline to the low point all by it self with out help
    SID

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    Unless the rivets had a hole in the middle of them I don't believe they were the sole problem with the boat leaking. Poor insulation of rivets, too thin of aluminum or uhmw, rocks ripping out rivets leaving a hole and the hull itself leaking to name the few problems.

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    There are modern, hi-tech adhesives that will securely bond UHMW to another material. Talk to a first tier plastics supplier and they should have info on the latest and greatest system. I have used Minnesota Plastics in Minneapolis. Their customer service was first rate.

    Of course, UHMW changes dimensions with temperature, complicating the issue.

    Thick UHMW (.75" or 1", etc.) can be machined to make durable parts for attachments.

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