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Thread: Fogproof Binocular ? for those in Coastal Alaska & Pacific NW

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    Default Fogproof Binocular ? for those in Coastal Alaska & Pacific NW

    I posted this over in the optics forum but the only activity on that site seems to be from a vendor so I'm posting here.

    I'm getting my first pair of binoculars (probably in 8 or 9x42) & am quite concerned over the exterior fogproof coatings of the different manufacturers. 90% of my hunting will be done in the cold & wet of northern SE. Who has the best fogproof coatings & can you substantiate their waterproof claim? What has your field testing revealed? Thanks

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    Used to have lots of luck with Redfield. Have had good luck with Nikon, lately have had real good luck with vortex. Sky is the limit, are you worried about fogging or condensation?

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    I've never heard of these failing durning hard use on fishing boats.
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    I use Leica Same pair for 20 years and never had a problem yet. Don
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    Quote Originally Posted by mooneyman View Post
    Used to have lots of luck with Redfield. Have had good luck with Nikon, lately have had real good luck with vortex. Sky is the limit, are you worried about fogging or condensation?
    Worried about all the above. One example is that you've just hiked to a steep ridge on a cold day, your breathing hard & look through your binoculars & fog them up from the heavy breathing. Surveyors used to breathe through tubes to keep their optics from collecting condensation. Another example, 33 deg F, raining, you pull your binoculars from your jacket pocket & find their completely clouded over.

    Bushnell claims their Rainguard is the best in the industry? I stress the word claim. Are they better than others?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kushtekaa View Post
    Worried about all the above. One example is that you've just hiked to a steep ridge on a cold day, your breathing hard & look through your binoculars & fog them up from the heavy breathing. Surveyors used to breathe through tubes to keep their optics from collecting condensation. Another example, 33 deg F, raining, you pull your binoculars from your jacket pocket & find their completely clouded over.

    Bushnell claims their Rainguard is the best in the industry? I stress the word claim. Are they better than others?
    I'm in the field with guys using many different brands in all environments and honestly I can't remember once any optic leaking or fogging up inside. Any optic that fogs from inside out has a leak. Outside fogging can be an issue regardless of the glass chosen. I will say this; there's a big difference between a $400 pair of glass and $2000 glass. Clarity and brightness. I have tested 5 brands side by side at one time in the field and not inside a retail store and that's where the difference will show up. In the field.
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    Charterboat Operator Abel's Avatar
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    I ahve a Bushnell 3200 Scope, it's never fogged, I've never had to wipe it except for debris. Water drops from rain don't even affect it. Ketchikan, Kodiak, Kenai, never had a single issue, my buddy was constantly wiping his luepold's.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kushtekaa View Post
    Worried about all the above. One example is that you've just hiked to a steep ridge on a cold day, your breathing hard & look through your binoculars & fog them up from the heavy breathing. Surveyors used to breathe through tubes to keep their optics from collecting condensation. Another example, 33 deg F, raining, you pull your binoculars from your jacket pocket & find their completely clouded over.

    Bushnell claims their Rainguard is the best in the industry? I stress the word claim. Are they better than others?
    Gee.........I just don't know what to say.........except basic 8th grade science should answer your question if the condensation is on the outside of the lens.
    Inside fogging is a leak in the case. Throw it in the river and get a good pair of glasses. I have hunted all over the world, from the Kalahari in Africa to the Arctic Circle, Leica, and a clean cotton cloth is what I carry. Good Luck on yoru quest. Don.
    Forgive me for being arrogant. I own 2 Drahthaar's.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kushtekaa View Post
    Surveyors used to breathe through tubes to keep their optics from collecting condensation. Another example, 33 deg F, raining, you pull your binoculars from your jacket pocket & find their completely clouded over.
    What you said here should tell you something. Understand that what you are talking about isn't any different than bringing a cold piece of steel into a warm building.......it's going to condensate. Fogging on the outside is a completely different story than fogging on the inside. I don't care what glass you have, if it's cool outside and your breathe on it, it's going to fog up. But there again.......that's on the outside. The only thing you should actually be worried about is fogging on the inside. And as far as that goes, if you go with a reputable brand, you shouldn't have to worry about it. Personally, imo, don't ever skimp on optics. Buy yourself THE BEST YOU CAN AFFORD and be done with it. Most people that rely on their glass usually go with one of the "Big 3." But there is a lot of good glass that's come up in the last few years which I can't comment on. Nikon has made a pretty good name for themselves as well.
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    I've been using the Pentax waterproof binocular for quite a few years here in central Southeast without any problems. They are 8 power, I've found that anything with higher power does not work well under the dense canopy in the poor lighting conditions of Southeast especially during the winter. Jim

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    No brand is infallible, but you tend to get what you pay for. I've been using a pair of Swarovski binos for about 30 years. About 25 years ago one tube fogged. Swaro repaired/replaced them at zero cost to me and they've performed flawlessly ever since. When I bought them I thought they were extremely expensive....30 years later I think they were one of the best and most cost effective purchases I've ever made.
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    if its cold and moist out and you pull out a nice warm pair of binos and start huffing and puffing into the eyepiece im pretty sure most are going to fog. usually if i hike a ways before i use my bino (leupolds) i stop and catch my breath so i can control my breathing before looking through them...works pretty well. i also leave the eyecups srewed in so there is a nice air gap seems to prevent fogging from breathing or sweat.

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    I have a set of Cabelas Alaskan Guide series 8x42's and love them. I misplaced them on Unalsaka Island one time for three days, it rained on them everyday-no water got in and no fogging. I have hunted with them from MS to AK. No issues-best glass I ever bought and I recommend to everyone.

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