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Thread: Good example of floatplane engine-out

  1. #1
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    Default Good example of floatplane engine-out

    This is a good example of just how fast things can go bad when the engine looses power on a float-plane. Particularly in a Beaver which glides like a dump truck.

    It is also a good example of a professional pilot taking care of the situation once on the ground.


    http://dms.ntsb.gov/aviation/Acciden...2013120000.pdf
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    This is a good example of just how fast things can go bad when the engine looses power on a float-plane. Particularly in a Beaver which glides like a dump truck.

    It is also a good example of a professional pilot taking care of the situation once on the ground.


    http://dms.ntsb.gov/aviation/Acciden...2013120000.pdf
    I'm a little confused by this link, partner. Interesting info on the C-207, though it never left the earth. Where's the Beaver with the engine-out?

  3. #3
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    What the heck...????

    http://dms.ntsb.gov/aviation/Acciden...2013120000.pdf



    On July 24, 2013, about 1140 Alaska daylight time, a float-equipped de Havilland DHC-2, N4787C,
    collided with trees following a loss of engine power near Lake Galea, about 15 miles northwest of
    Thorne Bay, Alaska, on Prince of Wales Island.

    The airline transport pilot and two passengers sustained serious injuries, one passenger sustained minor injuries, and the airplane sustained
    substantial damage.

    The on-demand air taxi flight was operated by Promech Air, LLC, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 135 with a company visual flight rules flight plan filed. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed.

    The flight departed Ketchikan Harbor Seaplane Base (5KE), Ketchikan, Alaska, at 1100 and was destined for Shipley Bay, Alaska.

    According to the pilot, the airplane was in cruise flight at an altitude of about 1,500 feet above mean sea level (msl), which he estimated was about 1,200 feet above ground level (agl) in the area over which he was flying, when he heard a loud "boom" and a series of loud and continuous
    "pop-pop-pop" noises. The pilot said that he reported on the company radio that he had lost an engine cylinder and was going to land. The pilot said that everything was shaking and that he did an immediate 180-degree turn to land on the lake that he had just overflown.
    The pilot stated that, as he turned the airplane on a base leg for the lake, he put in two pumps of flaps, and, about that
    time, the engine lost power completely. The pilot estimated that the amount of time that elapsed
    from when he first heard the loud "boom" to the time that the engine lost power completely was less
    than 1 minute. The pilot stated that, once the engine lost power completely, the airplane was soon
    colliding with trees. According to the operator, the airplane was located in a wooded area about
    300 yards from the lake.


    The pilot stated that he and two passengers were able to exit the airplane but the passenger in the
    right seat was unable to exit the airplane until more help arrived to assist.

    The pilot located the airplane's 406-MHz emergency locator transmitter and flipped the switch to the "on" position to be
    sure that it was transmitting. According to the operator, the Rescue Coordination Center telephoned
    the operator and provided coordinates for the downed airplane. The pilot also located the
    airplane's survival kit, and he and a passenger positioned a piece of wing wreckage in a marsh area
    to try to make the accident site visible to overflying aircraft. The pilot established cellular
    telephone contact with the operator, which had dispatched another company airplane to assist. The
    pilot said that he heard the other company airplane approaching and used a flare from the survival
    kit to signal his location. The other company airplane landed on Lake Galea, and
    company personnel
    hiked to the accident site to assist the pilot and passengers. A U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) helicopter
    from Air Station Sitka soon arrived. The USCG transported the pilot and all three passengers from
    the scene two at a time.

    Aircraft recovery personnel who retrieved the wreckage reported that engine cylinder separation
    damage was visible. Engine components have been retained for further examination. According to the
    operator, the Pratt & Whitney R-985-AN-14B engine had accumulated 31 hours since major overhaul.
    Updated on Aug 9 2013 6:40PM
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
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  4. #4
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    Newly overhauled engines have always made me nervous for at least the first 200 hours. I've had two instances of problems with newly overhauled engines with less than 30 hours. One was a Cessna 206. One piston was partial eaten away. There was a deep thud during flight. I turned around to head back to home base (wheel plane) and watched the oil temp slowly climb to redline as we made the 12 minute trip back. I made no power, altitude or airspeed changes until I had the runway made. Pulled the dipstick after shut down and the oil on the dipstick sparkled with little bits of metal. Needless to say, the engine was returned to the overhaul facility.

    The other was a beaver on floats. The break in instructions were followed precisely, but nevertheless, the engine consumed vast quantities of oil after that, but never did lose power.

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