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Thread: Land features near Glennallen

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    Default Land features near Glennallen

    This all may well be just a dream but what good are dreams if you donít dream them?

    Iíve been considering purchasing a 17 acre plot of land 5 miles west of Glennallen on the north side of the highway about a mile in from the State OTC land sales. If the dream ever becomes a reality I want to build a cabin from available timber on the plot and live off the grid.

    With that said, I have numerous questions that Iím hoping the good folks of this forum might be knowledgeable about and perhaps wouldnít mind writing a few sentences answering them. It would be nearly impossible for me to get up there to personally inspect the land for myself. At least in at this stage in the game. Iím 3800 miles away.

    First of all, I know nothing of the area so I donít know what type of wood is on the plot. The survey says itís ďwoodedĒ but doesnít say to what extent or the type and age of the trees. It also shows an aerial view of the plot but itís not a very clear image and hard to determine specifics.

    Does anyone have any knowledge of the area and if so are the trees in that area of a sufficient diameter to construct a log cabin out of? Something small to start with. Maybe an 8X12. Maybe even some clear photos of the area nearby that would be representative of the area in which I speak? And any soil conditions in that area I should be cautious about?

    Iíve done some pretty extensive internet searching about the area and have come across a great deal of information, but nothing totally committed to the specific plot. Only the general area. Has anyone out there ever set foot and eyes upon that specific area?

    Iíd also be interested if anyone could speculate as to why several of these State OTC land Sales get terminated after just a few years.

    Anything at all would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance,
    Bill

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by William42 View Post
    This all may well be just a dream but what good are dreams if you donít dream them?

    Iíve been considering purchasing a 17 acre plot of land 5 miles west of Glennallen on the north side of the highway about a mile in from the State OTC land sales. If the dream ever becomes a reality I want to build a cabin from available timber on the plot and live off the grid.

    With that said, I have numerous questions that Iím hoping the good folks of this forum might be knowledgeable about and perhaps wouldnít mind writing a few sentences answering them. It would be nearly impossible for me to get up there to personally inspect the land for myself. At least in at this stage in the game. Iím 3800 miles away.

    First of all, I know nothing of the area so I donít know what type of wood is on the plot. The survey says itís ďwoodedĒ but doesnít say to what extent or the type and age of the trees. It also shows an aerial view of the plot but itís not a very clear image and hard to determine specifics.

    Does anyone have any knowledge of the area and if so are the trees in that area of a sufficient diameter to construct a log cabin out of? Something small to start with. Maybe an 8X12. Maybe even some clear photos of the area nearby that would be representative of the area in which I speak? And any soil conditions in that area I should be cautious about?

    Iíve done some pretty extensive internet searching about the area and have come across a great deal of information, but nothing totally committed to the specific plot. Only the general area. Has anyone out there ever set foot and eyes upon that specific area?

    Iíd also be interested if anyone could speculate as to why several of these State OTC land Sales get terminated after just a few years.

    Anything at all would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance,
    Bill
    You better at least get some good pics, as "wooded" could mean a bunch of pecker poles that may only be good for a tee pee......
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  3. #3

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    If you want to PM me some information I will be up that way here over the next couple weeks. I could try to snap some photos for you.

    Edit: You might not be able to PM with just one post under your belt.

  4. #4

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    I live very close to Glennallen and I can say that it is most likely a black-spruce forest (pecker poles) with permafrost to deal with. It's also pretty boggy out that way as well. The permafrost issue should be in front of your mind, so do your homework on how to cope with the yearly frost-heave/permafrost and how it will affect your foundation. Most of the more modern houses are built on stilts with ways to adjust the when frost heave and permafrost affect the evenness.

    Good luck!
    But all conservation of wildness is self-defeating, for to cherish we must see and touch, and when enough have seen and touched, there is no wilderness left to cherish.
    -- Aldo Leopold

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    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    Without knowing the exact location I would bet, 5-20 foot tall black spruce nothing over 5" diameter. Discontinuous permafrost. Temps to -50 in the winter. Few caribou, small lakes around with whitefish, grayling and possibly trout. How much of the lot is usable?? Lots of swamp in that area.

    You don't need 17 acres out there. Because most of the land is not privately held, you have access to thousands of acres.

    That said..... unless you have a specific reason to be in that part of the state..... it isn't a dream..... more like a nightmare. Glennallen is cold. Not many jobs. Expensive fuel and food.
    I don't mean to sound bitter, cold, or cruel, but I am, so that's how it comes out.
    Bill Hicks

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    What Dirtofak said. It is a sea of small, pathetic, black spruce surrounded by patches of swamp. You'd have a hard time piecing together a cabin out of those and they don't make the greatest firewood either. Not much to keep warm with during extended cold snaps.

    Not trying to be mean, but, if you can't afford to come up and look before buying, you can't afford to live there.

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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Look elsewhere. In addition to being a black spruce swamp, there is no decent water. All the well water in that area smells and tastes like sulfurous swamp waste with a ton of rust in it. The area hardly qualifies as a town with hardly enough businesses to provide a fraction of your needs. "Town" is 3-1/2 hours away.

    The mosquitoes in that area would make survival just about the most uncomfortable thing imaginable, at least during the summer. In the winter, at least you'll be free of mosquitoes as you fight to stay warm in nearly non-stop 40 below zero temperatures. By the time March rolls around and it starts warming up into the negative 20's, you will absolutely be ready to move somewhere, anywhere else.

    Further, given the native land grabbing in the region, I'd be very skeptical about trying to pick up any land. Next thing you know, it could be suddenly owned by Ahtna and you're gone.

    Other than all that, it's "God's Country".
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

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    NRICK gave you the truth Bill. Internet searches are just a "let's go take a look" list.
    You might bundle up and spend a day in a walk in freezer. Cold and alone get old pretty fast.

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    Well I see how fortunate I am to have you good people looking out for me and telling me like it is. That's exactly what I was looking for. The reason I chose that particular place is that it is off of a main road, or any road for that matter. It would have made this venture easiest to make a reality. But mosquito infested lowland swamp is not what I had in mind. So thanks for your up front honesty.

    I haven't researched the entire area of OTC lands yet but whatever else I did see is only accessable by plane, boat, or snowmachine. And I can't afford, nor do I want to get a loan for, private land. I'm trying to get away from the way things are, not run towards them or keep them the same. Perhaps I'm just living in a fantacy world and the days of Richard Proenneke are gone forever. Still, I can't help but think there has to be some way to "get away from it all" and live in peace somewhere remote. I don't have all the answers, just the dream and desire to do so.

    When I was living and working in Wasilla a few years back I took the Alaska Railroad for a journey down to Seward for my 50th birthday. I learned that the railroad has a spur that is a "whistle stop" where you could just get off the train somewhere and when you want to return you just flag down the train on it's scheduled run back. Maybe that's an idea. Set up a part time seasonal job somewhere along the train route and live back in some remote part of the country. I could use the train for getting supplys. Maybe even make some kind of deal with a regular train user or conductor or train employee to drop supplys off for me at designated times and places. Hee-hee. Ah what the hell, if I never make it up there again maybe I could just live out this fantacy in my head.

    In some other part of the country waterways are accessable in the summer. I could get and use a small fishing boat to navigate to a town for supplys and a four wheeler and/or snowmachine to get them to the cabin. I've seen houses built in remote parts of that country that were only accessable by plane, etc. How did they get lumber to those places to build those houses? If they did it so can I!

    So, any thoughts on my craziness?

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    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    The easiest way to get a cabin package to the building site in this area is to haul it in over the snow. You can move a lot of material in a day depending on your location. I watched 18000lbs get hauled by newbies in a couple days last winter and they had to work hard the last mile.

    There are places like this too...... I have a friend that moved here.

    http://www.tenakeespringsak.com/
    I don't mean to sound bitter, cold, or cruel, but I am, so that's how it comes out.
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    There are only two things that stand between you and your dream and the first is MONEY then there is the hard work that comes the first day of the project and will end when you die on your dream property

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    Hard work is putting in a forty hour week so the man can live in his million dollar mansion. "What does a man gain from all his labor at which he toils under the sun?" King Soloman. To work an eighty hour week where I would reap all the benefits is easy work. Just sayin'.

    Thank you Alaskanmutt for the link. Some interesting property there.

    And thanks Dirtofak for the reminder that I don't need a lot of acres if a national park, or the like, is close at hand.

    Anybody know anything about the Lake Minchumina area? There is a nice 5 acre plot there at the base of Mt. McKinley that has 220 feet of lake frontage.
    And what's the police for cutting a few choice trees from State owned or National Park land?

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    What partt of MS are you in? There are some far away places in MS too. A good shack on a remote bayou in LA has long been a dream of mine. I spend a good amount of time "near" Glennallen and eveything said is true. It is hard to build an outhouse when you hit permafrost only a foot down at the end of June
    I have such a hard time trying to decide which outdoor activity to do every chance I get!! Living in AK is a mental challenge

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    Just over the border from Memphis, TN. I'm a native Wisconsinite so dealing with this heat is near impossible for me. I'll be down here for a couple more years but then I want out!

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