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Thread: King of the Weekend Warriors (full story and pics)

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    Default King of the Weekend Warriors (full story and pics)

    Ok, here goes. Full story and pictures of my hunt that makes me king of the weekend warriors:
    Originally I hadn't planned on hunting the opener because I have finally learned that I need to take
    more than one day to try and get a caribou. But what with the emergency order making Saturday my only
    chance to shoot any caribou I see, I decided I would like to jump on it. My regular hunting partner
    had the drawing tag and had already made plans this weekend. I talked to a friend from church who
    hadn't gone hunting in years and had mentioned wanting to try to go hunting for something. I figured
    it was a low-expectations hunt with the huge crowds and all so getting a caribou would be a nice
    bonus. He said he was up for it so we headed out Friday night towards Eureka.
    Amazing thing #1 happened when all the nasty rain and fog disappeared right at about Sheep Mountain.
    The weather would remain golden and beautiful until we returned to Anchorage. Amazing thing #2 was
    the excellent trail conditions due to the low amount of rain over the summer. Parking at Slide
    Mountain Cabins and heading east, we were able to get camped and set up on top of Slide Mountain around 11:00 PM with enough light to see what we were doing and go find some firewood.camp.jpeggood trails.jpeg (Second pic is from next morning)
    Born in Alaska: The boundary lines have fallen for me in pleasant places; surely I have a delightful inheritance. Psalm 16:6

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    For whatever reason, I despised my alarm clock and we didn't end up getting out of bed until 9:00. We
    woke up to steady wind but sunny skies and good visibility. We headed out, seeing lots of other
    hunters and not much action. Where the trail ends, someone had shot a caribou only about 30 minutes
    prior. We sat and ate blueberries for a while and used the momentary cell coverage to call our
    spouses. We head back on the trail, hoping to find a spot away from the other hunters. Jeremiah was
    having a little bit of shoulder pain and I didn't want to make him ride on terrain that he wasnt good
    enough to handle. (having not ridden a 4 wheeler for 10 years) At a certain spot, I found easy off
    trail running and a ridge that I was curious to see the other side of. We got down there in only
    about 15 minutes and stopped to give the area a good thorough glassing. After about 60 seconds, I saw
    the unmistakable dark trapezoid shape that a caribou's butt makes while grazing. It was about 12:00
    at this time. break time.jpegrain.jpeg
    Born in Alaska: The boundary lines have fallen for me in pleasant places; surely I have a delightful inheritance. Psalm 16:6

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    I've lost shots on caribou several times by rushing in too fast and spooking them and for once, I had
    the good sense to stop and just watch for a while before making a move. From about 700 yards away, I
    believed this to be a bull. We moved down to the next ridge, about 450 yards away and took another
    look. Glassing again, I noticed a pair of antlers sticking up 2 feet above the brush. Sure enough, a
    huge bull was attached to the bottom of them. He was laying down trying to hide while his tagalong
    buddy was standing up right next to him, broadcasting their position. I would never have seen him if
    it wasn't for the small bull standing.
    Taking our time again, we moved to the next knoll and sure enough, they hadn't moved. The little bull
    didn't even look up at us. The wind was in our favor and still blowing fairly hard and it must have
    masked our noise and motion. One more leapfrog got us to 170 yards away, across from a small beaver
    pond from them. The little bull at this point would look up at us occasionally but they still didn't
    show the slightest sign of uneasiness. I was absolutely giddy at this point. I actually had time to
    text my best friend and tell him what was going on before setting up for the shot. I set up my
    Stevens 416 Taylor on the bipod on my four wheeler cargo packer while sitting on the quad seat. It
    was the perfect shooting platform. Jeremiah got set up and was ready to shoot at the little guy, but
    I told him we were going to focus on the big guy. I told him to shoot the little guy if he stops
    running after my shot. After waiting at least 10 minutes, I had to whistle and talk to finally coax
    the big bull to stand up. He rose, shook himself off and began lazily wandering in no particular
    direction. He was still in absolutely no hurry to go anywhere. It took a further few minutes for him
    to offer a broadside shot. One bit of tension on the Timney trigger and a 350 grain Speer soft point
    wetn sailing through his right leg and lungs behind it. Every caribou I've ever been part of taking
    has run some distance after the lethal shot. Not this one. I've never seen a caribou anchored like
    this guy was. He jerked, put his head down, tried to take one step and collapsed 1 second later, no
    further than 1 foot from where I shot him. bigguy1.jpegbigguy3.jpeg
    Born in Alaska: The boundary lines have fallen for me in pleasant places; surely I have a delightful inheritance. Psalm 16:6

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    With the first shot, the young bull didn't run, but jumped twice and stopped to look back toward his
    counterpart. Jeremiah didn't miss a beat. The first shot hit him far back, but definitely hit him.
    Jeremiah reloaded and shot again but missed. He realized it and yelled 'MISS!' so I joined him and we
    gunned the second guy down until he stopped getting back up. A second later, the adrenaline dump hit,
    and I smiled, laughed and congratulated him on his first big game kill (technically, he was assisting
    me in the taking of my proxied permit, but he was super stoked on the experience). lilguy.JPG
    Born in Alaska: The boundary lines have fallen for me in pleasant places; surely I have a delightful inheritance. Psalm 16:6

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    It was 1:00 PM when we first shot. We rolled into camp at 7:00 PM with the 2 butchered caribou and
    decided it was early enough to pull camp and leave a day early. In the meantime, we had had only one
    single 5 minute rain shower. That has got to be the most unprecedented thing about this trip. The
    rain seems to follow me every fall. Anyways, we hit the trail, got a flat and limped back to Slide
    Mountain Cabins parking lot almost exactly 24 hours after we had motored out of there. From the
    moment I left my driveway to the moment I pulled back in was less than 29 hours. Unbelievable.
    I guess every now and then God sends an easy hunt. Time to cut, grind and drink a beer maybe.
    Henceforth I wish to be referred to as king of the weekend warriors. Or at least the luckiest weekend
    warrior.
    camp.jpegsunny.jpeg
    Born in Alaska: The boundary lines have fallen for me in pleasant places; surely I have a delightful inheritance. Psalm 16:6

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    fieldwork2.jpegIMG_0022.jpg Never had the shed this full before. Yee-haw!
    Born in Alaska: The boundary lines have fallen for me in pleasant places; surely I have a delightful inheritance. Psalm 16:6

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    Very nice. Congrats to both of you!

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    Great story and congrats to you both!!!

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    Cool story, nice bull. But thought you nailed a huge monster! Always next year! Never complain when a hunt goes easy man!

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    Quote Originally Posted by akrstabout View Post
    Cool story, nice bull. But thought you nailed a huge monster! Always next year! Never complain when a hunt goes easy man!
    I guess by Brooks range or northern coast standards he wouldn't be that impressive, but it's the biggest bull I've ever shot and I'm pretty stoked on him. One side is a double shovel and the other was starting to go double. Best of all, his meat tastes wonderful and there's a lot of it. He had a solid 1 1/2" of fat on his backside.
    Born in Alaska: The boundary lines have fallen for me in pleasant places; surely I have a delightful inheritance. Psalm 16:6

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    Nice bull and congratulations on a successful hunt. However, it's more than a bit bizarre that you act like you were the only successful hunter this weekend. And it's not at all a double shovel, you should really clarify your understanding of what that term is before using it...

    Again, thanks for sharing your hunt, but, uh, don't choke on your pride

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    Quote Originally Posted by andweav View Post
    Nice bull and congratulations on a successful hunt. However, it's more than a bit bizarre that you act like you were the only successful hunter this weekend. And it's not at all a double shovel, you should really clarify your understanding of what that term is before using it...

    Again, thanks for sharing your hunt, but, uh, don't choke on your pride
    This whole thread is bathed in irony, not pride (at least that was my intent). I've just never had a hunt go that magically quick and easy. Every other caribou has seemed to require so much more frustration, hard work and crappy weather. I don't actually think I'm king of the weekend warriors. Just seriously lucky this time.
    Born in Alaska: The boundary lines have fallen for me in pleasant places; surely I have a delightful inheritance. Psalm 16:6

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    Great accomplishment, and your sense of humor shows through clearly to me. Nice to know someone got out there and did a caribou double! By the way...looks like an excellent job of meat care. Success is rarely granted....often earned.

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    Quote Originally Posted by highestview View Post
    I guess by Brooks range or northern coast standards he wouldn't be that impressive, but it's the biggest bull I've ever shot and I'm pretty stoked on him. One side is a double shovel and the other was starting to go double. Best of all, his meat tastes wonderful and there's a lot of it. He had a solid 1 1/2" of fat on his backside.
    Congratulations on putting some tasty caribou in your freezer. I really don't think the size of the antlers should matter at all, it's the meat that does, and it sounds like you got a nice fat one. Besides, I thought if you were proxy hunting, the trophy value had to be destroyed on your bou and the proxy bou, like cutting it in half? I think it's the same for proxy hunting moose...I'm sure someone here will set me straight if I'm wrong.
    "Grin and Bear It"

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    Quote Originally Posted by highestview View Post
    I guess by Brooks range or northern coast standards he wouldn't be that impressive, but it's the biggest bull I've ever shot and I'm pretty stoked on him. One side is a double shovel and the other was starting to go double. Best of all, his meat tastes wonderful and there's a lot of it. He had a solid 1 1/2" of fat on his backside.

    That's all that matters man! Good healthy bull! Na, I have a vid from Lake louise back in 96, very very very imressive bull we seen, but had to shoot cows or bulls with 6 points or less! Guys cabin we were at, had already tagged his caribou the day before the opener for us, he was a resident full time and had a fed permit. It's on old VHS-C tape. Thing is crazy huge with long long points everywhere and the little nubs out the back of the rack, were like 18" long! Bezes looked like a whitetail rack! Got it on vid man, need to get it digitaly copied to dvd and get still pics off of it. Impressive! Nothing wrong with your big bull, just hoping it was a monster like we saw!

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    Man there is some major ball busters on here!!! Responder from the original post basically called him a liar cause he said it didnt rain. OP refers to the bull as " biggest bull caribou I have ever seen in person" and someone chirps in with "thought you nailed a huge monster". Maybe the Howdy Dowdy douch has everyone a little edgy.

    Dude is simply stoked about scoring on a nice double with his buddy. Great hunt. Congrats and thx for sharing it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tearbear View Post
    Congratulations on putting some tasty caribou in your freezer. I really don't think the size of the antlers should matter at all, it's the meat that does, and it sounds like you got a nice fat one. Besides, I thought if you were proxy hunting, the trophy value had to be destroyed on your bou and the proxy bou, like cutting it in half? I think it's the same for proxy hunting moose...I'm sure someone here will set me straight if I'm wrong.
    I don't know if I'm being call a ball buster here or not? Am I? All I wanted to know was the answer to the question that is highlighted...any responders? This may be some important & helpful info if you are going to be a proxy hunter.
    Thanks in advance for any answers on this question.

    And again, congrats on the nice bull!
    "Grin and Bear It"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tearbear View Post
    I don't know if I'm being call a ball buster here? Am I?
    No Sir. Just the couple I noted.

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    Well I am just plain jealous. Not only did you have good weather, while I was cold and wet all day, but you found a nice bull on top of it. Congrats and sorry for jumping the gun.

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    Antler Destruction is required for each animal taken by the proxy hunter, both the proxy hunter's animal(s) and the beneficiaries animal(s), and must occur at the kill site. Antler destruction consists of removing at least one antler from the skull plate or cutting the skull plate in half.

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