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Thread: saw mill question

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    Default saw mill question

    I just bought my little piece of heaven and will have quite a bit of trees to cut with getting access through the property (240 acres). I would like to use as much of the cut trees as possible for lumber and wanted to get y'alls opinion on the portable saw mills and what you thought of the band-saw type vs band-saw. Thank you for your time.

    BEE

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    Check out Lucas mill

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    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    My first choice would be a Mobile Dimension 24" mill with a dedicated outbuilding....you can cut perfect lumber that is actually good for something (as long as it is dried properly) with a setup like this....hobbyist lumbermaking is not for the faint of heart, or wallet, and much of the product I've seen is pretty inferior.....a Wood-Mizer in a garage-in-a-box would be a decent setup for milling d-logs and other rough stuff.
    " Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

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    Thank y'all for your responses. I have a lot of research ahead of me...

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    While you're thinking about it you might want to go out and ring the base of the trees you plan on using to start them drying out.....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    While you're thinking about it you might want to go out and ring the base of the trees you plan on using to start them drying out.....
    Milling dry spruce will wreck a lot of sawblades......
    " Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

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    Member Akheloce's Avatar
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    I get about 4 hours of solid milling on beetle kill before the blade needs sharpened. All of my logs get skidded in the winter.
    ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

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    Quote Originally Posted by cdubbin View Post
    Milling dry spruce will wreck a lot of sawblades......
    Same goes for your chainsaw...doesn't have as much lubrication as green wood.
    "Grin and Bear It"

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    Quote Originally Posted by cdubbin View Post
    Milling dry spruce will wreck a lot of sawblades......
    I was mainly thinking about killing the trees and leaving them stand for house logs......
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    I was mainly thinking about killing the trees and leaving them stand for house logs......
    I get that....however, the fastest way to dry a log is get it down, the ends cut and the bark off, and get it under cover, with cross-ventilation.....just ringing live trees and letting them slowly die and dry would take years, I imagine.
    " Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

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    Quote Originally Posted by cdubbin View Post
    I get that....however, the fastest way to dry a log is get it down, the ends cut and the bark off, and get it under cover, with cross-ventilation.....just ringing live trees and letting them slowly die and dry would take years, I imagine.
    Yes, if time wasn't a concern. But actually, from what I hear it "can" kill a the tree pretty quick, and then I would think that spending a few winters would zap a lot of the moisture out of it. All I know is as far as house logs go, they do this to keep them nice and straight.....which is a good thing without having to do too much work.....lol.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  12. #12

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    Here is a good source for info..........http://www.forestryforum.com/board/i...65f9a8636cbbc8.........

    I have worked a variety of mills and they all have there place. I own and have been happy with a MSG mini mill 250 that I built the track for from materials I purchased at the local steel yard. I now have a woodmizer as well. Band sawing has some quirks but once you get the hang of it it returns alot of wood. PM me if you want more specific details about the entire process and how it's evolved over the years.

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    I sure appreciate y'alls input and thank you for offering your own experiences to share. I like to research things before doing/buying and I really like to hear it from those who have done it!

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    Member Sobie2's Avatar
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    No the question is what is the diameter of the trees you need to saw? There are a lot of mills out there and vary a lot based on size. Here in Southeast Alaska you need a mill than can handle 36" diameter logs. Up north you may need to mill up to 24" logs.

    Sobie2

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    My new 'neighbor' who has land above me is from SE AK and he said "where they have real trees"- his chainsaws have 38" bars! I had not seen that except on TV shows. I do understand the need for assessing the size need!

    Quote Originally Posted by Sobie2 View Post
    No the question is what is the diameter of the trees you need to saw? There are a lot of mills out there and vary a lot based on size. Here in Southeast Alaska you need a mill than can handle 36" diameter logs. Up north you may need to mill up to 24" logs.

    Sobie2

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