Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Hopefully New to Bowhunting

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    100

    Default Hopefully New to Bowhunting

    I am currently far from my new home in Alaska. My mind constantly returning and planning and looking forward to next year. That said, I am very interested in beginning bowhunting. I've found quite a few pointers in these forums as well as on some other sites. My question is where do you all like to find your latest and greatest bow information? Techtalk about bows, sights, rests, tuning, building arrows and the like is what I am looking for.

  2. #2
    Member Lex's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    South of Juneau
    Posts
    183

    Default

    If your willing to put up with a lot of B.S,You might look in to Archery talk.com. Some times (Not always).But some times you canget some good info on sights rest ect etc .

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    All-I-SAW, AK.
    Posts
    1,032

    Smile Archery info.

    As stated above, there are several websites to choose from and a lot of info out there.

    Bowsite.com, 24hr campfire.com, etc... has a fair amount as well... Like all of them, you have to sift through a little BS here and there to get what you want or need. Also, head to your nearest archery shop if you can and pound the hell out of them with questions. Also while there, just watch people and listen. That helps too... At a pro shop, it doesn't take long for you to hear and see who's talking ***** and who "is" THE *****...

    Best of luck to ya and welcome (hopefully) to bowhunting...

    Pick a spot!

  4. #4
    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    4,925

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lex View Post
    If your willing to put up with a lot of B.S,You might look in to Archery talk.com. Some times (Not always).But some times you canget some good info on sights rest ect etc .

    Second that!!!!!!!! I hate it when it get bow vs. bow
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

  5. #5
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Marshall
    Posts
    1,975

    Default Bowmags...

    Are really helpful, & I love Petersen's Bowhunting...Then you can get Bowhunter as well, & if you can join one of the many shooting clubs around, Blacksheep bowman, Kincade Field Archery, Cook Inlet Archery, etc. there's some good people there, that are willing & able to help you out...I started out with a used York bow, shoot through riser, graduated to a Martin Cougar, & then took the plunge with a Mathews Outback...I know own a Mathews Switchback XT as well, & If I had the dough I'd buy the Drenalin...start small & work your way up...

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    100

    Default New vs. Used

    How much can I expect to pay for a used set-up? I'm talkin bow, sight, rest, quiver, case, basically everything I'd need to get if I walked into a store. Is it in the 50% range? Much higher? Much lower? Thanks again for the help, it's most appreciated!

  7. #7
    Member NDTerminator's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Devils Lake ND
    Posts
    262

    Default

    Eastman's Bowhunting Journal is a very good source of information. Great stories too, quite a number in AK, The Yukon, and BC...

    I don't have the patience for the BS that goes with most dedicated archery/bowhunting forums. I like Bowsite best of any, I suppose...

    Although my love is Traditional archery and I have a half dozen custom & semi custom recurves, arthritis in my drawing hand forces me to use a release and modern tackle for roughly 80% of my archery.

    I like Reflex bows and have used them exclusively since the mid 90's. I simply refuse to lay down the cash being asked for a top end Matthews, Hoyt, PSE, or similar setup. I use Whisker Biscuit rests, Archers Choice sights, a string loop, and Tru Fire Releases. I prefer Carbon Express Terminator Hunter arrows.

    You can order a new Reflex Bighorn fully setup with a WB rest, sights, quiver, stabilizer, and bow sling from Cabelas for $450 right now. All you have to do is buy a release, string loop (if you prefer them), arrows, and a set of Allen wrenches to make adjustments, and you're set. That's hard to beat, and I may order up one just to add to my arsenal.

    I would go this route rather than buy used...
    Last edited by NDTerminator; 05-23-2007 at 03:46.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Mile 102 Glenn Highway
    Posts
    335

    Default

    I would recommend going to a good pro shop. That will give you a chance to shoot different setups. When I bought my first bow I went to a pro shop (Fletchers Archery) and was able to shoot different bows until I found one that I liked and was comfortable with. Since I bought it they have been very helpful in answering any questions that I have had. You might pay a little more at a pro shop than on e-bay but in my opinion the support that you get from a good pro shop is well worth a little extra cost. There is nothing like being able to talk face to face with a knowledgeable person when you have a problem.

  9. #9
    Member NDTerminator's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Devils Lake ND
    Posts
    262

    Default

    Starting out with the help of a good (I emphasise; GOOD) pro shop is the best way to go, no doubt. I didn't mention it as I don't know how available archery pro shops are up there. If you can get to one, go that route. When they set up your bow, ask to watch it done. As you watch, ask questions and take note of the tools used. A good pro shop will be more than happy to accomodate you.

    It's not overly difficult to setup and tune your own bow, you just need a few basic tools (which you will get eventually anyway for basic maintainance), a target, and a place to shoot out to 20 yards. There are quite a few websites that show basic setup, Hoyt 's comes immediately to mind. Setting up and tuning your own bow is quite satisfying, as is building your own arrows.

    Two days ago I was over at Cabelas in East Grand Forks MN, and picked up a 06' model Reflex Buckskin for $285 ($400+ in last year's catalog) on Clearance. For $50 more I could have gotten a fully setup and equipped 06' Excursion. Didn't really need the new Reflex, but as my dad used to say "It was such a good bargain I couldn't afford not to buy it"...

    As with all the Reflex bows I've had & still own, it was a cinch to set up. Took about 40 minutes to fully set it up (adjust draw length, draw weight and tiller, install & tie in peep and silencers, put on & set initial position of nock point, WB rest, and string loop, put on wrist sling & stabilizer, wax string & bus cables).

    My initial setting of the nock point & rest (I start with the rest at centershot & nock point at +1/8") proved to be so close that I doubt I will have to make any adjustments; shooting through paper today will show me if I have to do any fine tuning. Was getting visually pefect arrow flight and three arrow groups I could pull from the target with one hand all at the same time out to 40 yards.

    As an aside, I set up all my bows to use the same arrows/broadheads. I just find this an easier way to go. I also have found over the years it's very rare to get a tune that delivers both target point and broadheads to the same point of impact (POI), due to the myriad variable involved. If it happens, count you blessings.

    I will also add that duplicate POI is more common with mechanicals (which I don't use), and the new short stiff Blazer style vanes help. My wife's Matthews Mustang, for example, does duplicate POI using Blazer vanes and three blade broadheads. I have her set up with arrows very stiff for her draw weight, which is an advantage for good broadhead flight.

    So being, you will probably have to sight in with your broadheads when the season rolls around. I get around this by using Archers Choice Pro Hunter sights which use a removable bracket system. I have one sight sighted in with broadheads and a second for target points, for each bow. It takes seconds to just swap out the practice sight for the broadhead sight when I go hunting.

    What I mean to convey in all this is that a large part of the satisfaction of archery is learning and doing things yourself...

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •