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Thread: Reduction to limits in 3A?

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    Member TWB's Avatar
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    Default Reduction to limits in 3A?

    Limited info, where does the stand? Is this a new thing or?

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    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

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    The catch sharing plan has been out there for awhile. Go ahead and comment on it. Just don't be like the other 90% of sport anglers out there who put no thought into it, other than to display that they think they are entitled to two halibut a day.

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    Wasnt planning on commenting, just curious. Not sure who the 90% are either.
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

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    I believe the comment period is closed. There will be times to make comments as it moves through the next North Pacific Fisheries Management Councils meetings. For some reason I can't get the .gov sites to open right now, or I'd link to the schedule. TWB I think the 90% would be anyone who would take what is on that pamphlet at face value and not look further into the issue.

    As for your title....if Biomass keeps decreasing, and size at age keeps going down.............would you support a one fish limit?

  5. #5

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    I think they extended the public comment period a few weeks.

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    CSP Comment period extended to 8/26/13.
    A plan that reallocates without
    compensation 30% of the guided allocation to commercial fishermen and then allows them to rent it back to guided
    anglers is nothing more than a resource grab.
    The CSP is not about conservation; every fish reallocated to the commercial sector will be caught and killed. The CSP doesn’t
    share the burden of conservation any better than the current Guideline Harvest Level (GHL).
    The guided harvest is currently managed within its allocation using the same tools proposed under the CSP.
    A US District Court has affirmed the GHL as Fair and Equitable. A plan that takes from the GHL and then allows
    guided anglers to rent their fish back is not Fair and Equitable.The Magnuson Stevens National Standard 5 prohibits fishery
    conservation and management measures from having economic allocation as their sole purpose.

  7. #7

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    That's a bit misleading, and part of the reason I am starting to grow weary of SEAGO and other guide associations. What the 3a charters aren't telling you is that halibut stocks are in big big trouble. If you go down to 1 halibut, it will be for a VERY good reason. If you go down to a "slot" fish, it'll be for a even bigger reason. Commercial fishermen will also be taking big cuts.

    Any charter in 3a that didn't see this coming, and didn't make the necessary plans.. well, I don't have much pity for them.

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    The first thing that needs to go is the charters that do two trips a day. Those need to end first

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    Quote Originally Posted by kgpcr View Post
    The first thing that needs to go is the charters that do two trips a day. Those need to end first


    Why? It seems to me they have a viable business model that does not include targeting breeders. It's the charters that pound those 30-160lb breeders on a daily basis that need to knock it off.

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    I am willing to support a change in charter catch by eliminating any fish retention in the 30-150 pound range as long as that slot limit also applies to all commercial take. Oh yeah, and if my limit gets cut by 50percent then I want a 50 percent cut to the commercial quota as well (and I mean cut from current levels, not from the all time high quota level).

  11. #11

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    It wouldn't be a 50% cut if they go down to 1 fish. The average size of the 1 fish will grow in size.

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    Smells fishy to me, the average guy who just wants to help feed his family by doing a charter once a year is the loser? The result will most likely be more pressure on the large fish as they will just catch and release sorting out for larger ones and the high dollar trophy hunters and charters that cater to them not affected? A slot limit makes more sense and would have a better chance at actually accomplishing something.

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    Quote Originally Posted by redleader View Post
    Smells fishy to me, the average guy who just wants to help feed his family by doing a charter once a year is the loser? The result will most likely be more pressure on the large fish as they will just catch and release sorting out for larger ones and the high dollar trophy hunters and charters that cater to them not affected? A slot limit makes more sense and would have a better chance at actually accomplishing something.
    Have you read the catch sharing plan?

    The reality that most people will need to accept is that the "good old days" of taking 1 charter, and getting 100lbs of halibut meat are going to be long gone. The halibut stocks simply can't support it.

    If you go and actually read the catch sharing plan, you'll see that the allocation will be on a sliding scare, that goes up and down based on the tak commercial catch. Read up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 270ti View Post
    Have you read the catch sharing plan?

    The reality that most people will need to accept is that the "good old days" of taking 1 charter, and getting 100lbs of halibut meat are going to be long gone. The halibut stocks simply can't support it.

    If you go and actually read the catch sharing plan, you'll see that the allocation will be on a sliding scare, that goes up and down based on the tak commercial catch. Read up.
    Will the Halibut stocks support the increased pressure on large fish from the csp? How about the increased catch and release mortality while you look for your one large enough or gaf fish? Can of worms with lots of collateral damage.

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    270, am I reading this right that 2c will keep the slot but you will be able to keep a gaf fish of any size?

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by redleader View Post
    270, am I reading this right that 2c will keep the slot but you will be able to keep a gaf fish of any size?



    I don't think so.. But I am not sure.

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    Homerdude, thanks for clearing up the ending day. My computer was acting up. Here is a link on the end date, and information on comments.

    http://alaskafisheries.noaa.gov/news...sext072413.htm

    NEWS RELEASE
    July 24, 2013
    Julie Speegle, 907-586-7032 w., 907-321-7032 c.
    NOAA responds to requests, extends comment period for halibut catch sharing plan

    NOAA Fisheries is extending the public comment period for the proposed halibut catch sharing plan by 14 days, after receiving a number of requests for additional time for public input.
    The Proposed Rule to Implement a Halibut Catch Sharing Plan for Guided Sport and Commercial Fisheries in Alaska published in the Federal Register on June 28, opening a 45-day public comment period which would have closed on August 12. With the 14-day extension, comments are now due August 26.
    Most requests submitted to NOAA sought a comment period extension of 45 days, noting the comment period falls at the height of fishing season in Alaska, and fishermen who might want to comment are out on the water and may be unable to submit comments by deadline.
    NOAA has carefully considered these requests, and we recognize the concerns of working fishermen who want the opportunity to comment on the proposed rule. To allow for greater opportunity for public input, NOAA has determined that the agency can grant an extension for 14 days, until August 26.This allows for a comment period of two months. An extension longer than this would jeopardize implementation of the catch sharing plan for the 2014 fishing season should NOAA proceed with a final rule after considering public comment.
    "The halibut catch sharing plan has been developed through the collaborative effort and hard work of many people over several years, and through a transparent and robust public input process," said Alaskan regional administrator Dr. James Balsiger. "We strongly encourage folks to take the time to sit down and read the actual text of the plan so they'll have the facts before commenting."
    Balsiger added that NOAA Fisheries expects to receive thousands of comments on the proposed rule, which will need to be analyzed and responded to if a final rule is to be published in late 2013 to allow for implementation for the 2014 charter halibut fishery.
    The North Pacific Fishery Management Council recommended the catch sharing plan to establish a clear allocation between the commercial and charter sectors in southeast Alaska and the central Gulf of Alaska, provide stability for affected halibut fishery participants, and provide halibut fishery managers with greater precision in setting halibut catch limits and management measures that are responsive to annual changes in halibut exploitable biomass and fishing effort. In recommending the catch sharing plan, the council urged NOAA Fisheries to implement the catch sharing plan for the 2014 fishing season.
    The combined catch limit would be determined by the International Pacific Halibut Commission each year prior to the fishing season. Under the catch sharing plan, the allocations to the charter and commercial sectors would vary directly with annual changes in halibut abundance, with relatively higher allocations to the charter sector in years of low abundance, when that sector would most be affected by a lower combined catch limit. Charter harvest restrictions, such as a daily bag limit, would be specified annually prior to the upcoming fishing season based on projected harvests and charter catch limits—similar to the management approach that has been used for the past two years. The proposed catch sharing plan would not affect halibut harvest limits in place for unguided anglers.
    Address comments to Glenn Merrill, Assistant Regional Administrator, Sustainable Fisheries Division, Alaska Region NMFS, Attn: Ellen Sebastian, and identified by FDMS Docket Number NOAA-NMFS-2011-0180. Comments may be submitted by any of the following methods:

    • Electronic Submission: via the Federal e-Rulemaking Portal at www.regulations.gov
    • Mail: P.O. Box 21668, Juneau, AK 99802-1668
    • Fax: 907-586-7557

    A copy of the proposed halibut catch sharing plan is available online at the NOAA Fisheries Alaska Region website: alaskafisheries.noaa.gov.
    NOAA's mission is to understand and predict changes in the Earth's environment, from the depths of the ocean to the surface of the sun, and to conserve and manage our coastal and marine resources. Join us on Facebook, Twitter and our other social media channels.
    To learn more about NOAA Fisheries in Alaska, visit alaskafisheries.noaa.gov or www.afsc.noaa.gov.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Homerdude View Post
    CSP Comment period extended to 8/26/13.
    A plan that reallocates without
    compensation 30% of the guided allocation to commercial fishermen and then allows them to rent it back to guided
    anglers is nothing more than a resource grab.
    The CSP is not about conservation; every fish reallocated to the commercial sector will be caught and killed. The CSP doesn’t
    share the burden of conservation any better than the current Guideline Harvest Level (GHL).
    The guided harvest is currently managed within its allocation using the same tools proposed under the CSP.
    A US District Court has affirmed the GHL as Fair and Equitable. A plan that takes from the GHL and then allows
    guided anglers to rent their fish back is not Fair and Equitable.The Magnuson Stevens National Standard 5 prohibits fishery
    conservation and management measures from having economic allocation as their sole purpose.
    Commercial catch shares are a quota. Catch shares have been shrinking for how many years now? Sport catch has been growing. So how can you say with a straight face that sport quota is being reallocated to commercial fisheries, when actually commercial shares have been reallocated to sport fisheries?
    An opinion should be the result of thought, not a substitute for it.
    - Jef Mallett

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by safari View Post
    I am willing to support a change in charter catch by eliminating any fish retention in the 30-150 pound range as long as that slot limit also applies to all commercial take. Oh yeah, and if my limit gets cut by 50percent then I want a 50 percent cut to the commercial quota as well (and I mean cut from current levels, not from the all time high quota level).
    That's the issue, in 2C the commercial sector is down to 25% of where they were just a few years ago. That would be like you going from 2 fish a day to one fish every other day--and they have already done it willingly. The commercial sector has been getting cut back for years in the interest of conservation, but the charters have yet to have any significant reduction. The catch sharing plan is designed to protect both sectors over the long-haul, and provide some stability to the resource.

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKJOB View Post
    That's the issue, in 2C the commercial sector is down to 25% of where they were just a few years ago. That would be like you going from 2 fish a day to one fish every other day--and they have already done it willingly. The commercial sector has been getting cut back for years in the interest of conservation, but the charters have yet to have any significant reduction. The catch sharing plan is designed to protect both sectors over the long-haul, and provide some stability to the resource.
    Charters in 2c have had significant reductions. We started at 2 fish, any size, and now have 1 fish, with a reverse slot limit where every fish between 45 and 68" must be released. One year we had one fish under 37".

    The interesting thing is that charters are booming in SE right now. When the cuts first happened, it cleaned all the culls out of the business. Every fly by night operator disappeared. The good/responsible operators survived, and are booked more than ever. I just finished day 63, and I have 9 more to go. I had zero complaints on halibut this year, with the exception of a few groans when I released those slot fish. Just some perspective from 2c. It's not all the doom/gloom the 3a charters are trying to make it out to be.

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