Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Need input on new boat for middle Kenai

  1. #1
    New member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    52

    Default Need input on new boat for middle Kenai

    I'm looking into buying a power boat for fishing rainbows on the Middle River Kenai. I would like to run a 40/35 jet to work the skinny waters of the late fall. Willie no longer builds the 17ft legend (which was my plan). Input would be appreciated.

    Jim

  2. #2
    Member ak_logan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Kenai
    Posts
    149

    Default

    Id look for a 16-18 foot g3. Well built lots of them running around on the river. That is what I would look at if I did not have a 20' predator already.

  3. #3
    Member akprideinvegas's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Ak
    Posts
    579

    Default

    I run a 1652 g3 with a 50 horse jet. Love it. runs shallow. Bought it used but would go with the 1756 or 1860 if i did it again. a wider boat would be nice and believe it would help me get on step quicker even with the added weight. the lighter weight of the 1652 is nice and being able to tell people i dont have room for them and dont have to guide them around the river.
    NRA life Member JVJ

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    221

    Default

    If you don't mind a riveted boat, I think you would be well served with an 1852 crestliner CR jon boat paired with a tiller steering 40/30 Yamaha four stroke jet drive motor. I have the exact same set-up and have been happy. With a decent set of oars it is mavuverable enough to drift and fish out of. The motor will not use much gas. The light weight of the set-up makes it easy to get unstuck, it tows behind a smaller truck easily and is easy for one guy to manhandled around and launch and recover. The Yamaha motor is a proven motor and is very dependable. I think you can even get

    Unless you have a specific reason otherwise, get the 1852 and not the 1652. For a minimal increase in hull weight, you get a significant increase in planing surface which allow you to get on step quicker and haul heavier loads. I've had a medium sized moose, with myself and one other guy, a lighter weight camp and 20 gallons of fuel and was able to get on step and run in shallow water without too much trouble.

    The biggest downside to the riveted hull is the aluminum is a little thinner and thus it doesn't handle accidentally smacking bigger rocks like a welded hull will and the transoms will develop some stress cracks over the years. I think that the stress cracks in the transom are primarily due to towing the boat too fast on rough roads. My boat is almost 10 years old and is just now showing 1 tiny hairline crack in the gunnel just forward of the corner brace on the transom. It should be an easy thing to get reinforced and welded up. If you want a welded boat, it would probably be best to step up to a 50 hp motor.

    Also the crestliner hull doesn't come with a tunnel and I don't think it is needed. A tunnel doesn't really let run much shallower in a boat like that, it just will cause the boat to hit bottom before the motor does. I also think a tunnel on a boat like mine would very slightly decrease it's hole shot for getting on step.

  5. #5
    Member akprideinvegas's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Ak
    Posts
    579

    Default

    awesome info bairdi. good explanation
    NRA life Member JVJ

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    221

    Default

    Also forgot to mention that one of the most important things I do to ensure good performance is to regularly re-shim my impeller and check the condition of the sleeve. I probably wear through sleeves a little faster but I certainly notice the difference between when I've recently shimmed the impeller vs when it hasn't been done in a while.

  7. #7
    Member Sobie2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    1,039

    Default

    What about a Rogue Stealth Jet or a Motion Marine Kenai Killer?

    Or a SeaArk 1660MVJT (jet tunnel) or 1860 MVPT 45-50 Prop with a rock hopper(prop tunnel). I bought a SeaArk 1652 MVJT with a 50/35 and now have a SeaArk 1860 MVJT 90/65. The rockhopper on I think only goes up to 30HP come to think of it but with with the prop that is a lot of HP and only part of the fully protected skeg is below the bottom of the hull. I easily planed out two guys, and trapping gear with my 1652 with just a 15hp prop. If you get a prop get one without power tilt and trim so it will kick up if you bounce something. IF you get a jet only buy a boat with jet tunnel.

    Last year I bought the SeaArk 1860 MVJT on a new King trailer in Petersburg for $8,500 (I already had the motor)

    Sobie2

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    221

    Default

    Those boats you mention are interesting. If I did more fishing out of a boat I'd be interested in at least checking out the Stealth Jet.

    And yes, if getting a tunnel hulled boat for a jet, make sure the tunnel is appropriate for a jet and it is really important to make sure the motor is mounted to the correct height. Performance will really suffer if the tunnel is of a poor design or if the foot sits too high or low in the tunnel. The Alweld boats have a good tunnel design. I've seen a few boats with fairly large motors for the hull size that really were under performing dogs because either the tunnel was to deep, the motor was mounted too high in the tunnel, or a combination of the both. One boat in particular had a 90/65 jet on a 18 foot hull and had terrible cavitation issues and would barely get 2 guys and a little bit of camping gear on step. I think that boat likely had a tunnel designed for a prop.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •