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Thread: question for long liners

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    Default question for long liners

    So the other day, I watched a long liner pulling gear at a well known rock pile near the north end of Montague. I think I know the answer, but I'll ask anyway... Why would one set gear on a jagged shallow rock pile knowing that a very large percentage of the catch will be rockfish, ling, and sublegal halibut? I am sure that gear loss must be substantial. This is not an "I hate long liners" post, just wondering what people think about this. For the record, I think sport boats are hitting the ling and rockfish a little hard too, as they are easier to find than halibut. I would support a one ling limit in more areas, if it was implemented for the right reasons.

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    For a home pack, because snapper and rock fish are better to eat then halibut! Lings not so much.

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    Because halibut live there too
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    And might have been black cod fishing.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Franken Fish View Post
    And might have been black cod fishing.
    Not likely in a place where lings live. Perhaps I'm wrong, but we target sablefish in 300+ fathoms and have never caught a single ling cod as bycatch. Shortrakers and thornyheads, yes, but never a ling.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Not likely in a place where lings live. Perhaps I'm wrong, but we target sablefish in 300+ fathoms and have never caught a single ling cod as bycatch. Shortrakers and thornyheads, yes, but never a ling.
    I had a skipper that loved fishing rock piles. Rough on the gear but we had some sick trips! I have seen LingCod as bycatch both Long Lining and Pot Fishing. Happens.
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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Interesting - I didn't mean to question you, it just doesn't fit my experience. I've never pot fished for sablefish, but all longlining I've done has been in a minimum of 200 fathoms, and usually between 300 and 400+. No lings at those depths, but plenty of halibut, thornyheads, arrowtooth, sleeper sharks, etc. Just got back yesterday from just such a trip.

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    Correct me if I'm wrong, but longliners get a certain percentage of ling and yellow eye as incidental catch, that they can sell. So, they can boost the $ they make on a trip if they get ling/yellow eye too. I was told by a longliner that he always gets right at the maximum he's allowed of the yellow eye.

    BTW, the bigger 'buts live around the rocks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 270ti View Post
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but longliners get a certain percentage of ling and yellow eye as incidental catch, that they can sell. So, they can boost the $ they make on a trip if they get ling/yellow eye too. I was told by a longliner that he always gets right at the maximum he's allowed of the yellow eye.

    BTW, the bigger 'buts live around the rocks.
    I don't know what yelloweye goes for, but our shortraker catch goes for only 35 cents/lb. At that rate, it's not worth the time to target them specifically - in fact, we do our best to avoid known concentrations of them altogether. Thornyheads go for a bit more at 75 cents/lb, but even still it's not something we target specifically.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 270ti View Post
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but longliners get a certain percentage of ling and yellow eye as incidental catch, that they can sell. So, they can boost the $ they make on a trip if they get ling/yellow eye too. I was told by a longliner that he always gets right at the maximum he's allowed of the yellow eye.

    BTW, the bigger 'buts live around the rocks.
    Its not something you do as to target more species to increase the profitability of a trip. Its more something thats done so the bycatch isnt wasted. It happens in all fisheries, trawling, pot fishing, long lining, gillnetting, seining, etc. Personally Im all for it and the processors should just figure out more ways to process and market more of it!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Interesting - I didn't mean to question you, it just doesn't fit my experience. I've never pot fished for sablefish, but all longlining I've done has been in a minimum of 200 fathoms, and usually between 300 and 400+. No lings at those depths, but plenty of halibut, thornyheads, arrowtooth, sleeper sharks, etc. Just got back yesterday from just such a trip.
    I didnt take it as that. Ive had the pleasure of fishing a lot of different fisheries all over the state. Had different skippers do different things in the same fishery. Sometimes doing something out of the norm costs you lots of money and sometimes it makes you lots of money. Depends how the seasons going and what your willing to do to get your fish.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    I don't know what yelloweye goes for, but our shortraker catch goes for only 35 cents/lb. At that rate, it's not worth the time to target them specifically - in fact, we do our best to avoid known concentrations of them altogether. Thornyheads go for a bit more at 75 cents/lb, but even still it's not something we target specifically.
    Not sure what they get for the yellow eye. I figure it's not much, considering the size of fillet versus the body size of them. But, my point was that if a longliner can pay for the fuel by setting in the rocks, and getting his halibut and some yelloweye/ling, why not? And, as I mentioned, those big mommas ain't exactly swimming around on the sand..

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    I don't know what yelloweye goes for, but our shortraker catch goes for only 35 cents/lb. At that rate, it's not worth the time to target them specifically - in fact, we do our best to avoid known concentrations of them altogether. Thornyheads go for a bit more at 75 cents/lb, but even still it's not something we target specifically.
    I don't know how seafood is marketed, how prices are set or how many middlemen are involved, but $.35 per pound for what I consider fine eating just about stroked me out, considering what I'd pay retail Not questioning your word in any way, Brian...just very surprised at how values are placed, and not just in the commercial fishing industry.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Garyak View Post
    I don't know how seafood is marketed, how prices are set or how many middlemen are involved, but $.35 per pound for what I consider fine eating just about stroked me out, considering what I'd pay retail Not questioning your word in any way, Brian...just very surprised at how values are placed, and not just in the commercial fishing industry.
    The retail price of fish can be a 1000% higher because of processing and shipping costs. The middle man always makes out no matter what industry your in.
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    They were likely getting their by catch allowance of lings and rockers. Cape Cleare has not seen any commercial pressure since June 23rd. I did see a couple of 58's fishing around Patton Bay a week ago but were not there long. More boats out around Middleton but there is plenty of room out there for everyone who ventures out that far.
    Fishing around our end of the island has been pretty slow right now and wouldn't be a good bet for long lining. But..... Just south of where you were fishing yesterday in about 75 fathoms would be a slaughter for a small longliner!!

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    75 FA sounds like a much better bet. I don't think I'd want to set and risk losing a bunch of gear where 90% of the fish are likely to be black rockfish, ling, and u32s... I guess those occasional big ones must be worth it. I also thought that the area was within a 3 mile sealion exclusion zone, but apparently, that's only for "ground fish". Halibut fishing (and the weather) on this end isn't quite as epic as it was a month ago either, but that's about normal, I guess. Good thing for those silvers!

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    Quote Originally Posted by 270ti View Post
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but longliners get a certain percentage of ling and yellow eye as incidental catch, that they can sell. So, they can boost the $ they make on a trip if they get ling/yellow eye too. I was told by a longliner that he always gets right at the maximum he's allowed of the yellow eye.

    BTW, the bigger 'buts live around the rocks.
    Biggest halibut I've ever gotten on my little 30 hook skate was on the rocks. 280 pound halibut, pulled by hand. Now that was an epic battle!
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    Quote Originally Posted by offshore View Post
    I guess those occasional big ones must be worth it.
    Occasional? Your fish up there must be different than our fish down here. All my big scores have come from my scent washing over and around some pretty nasty rockpiles. I rarely get halibut under 30lbs, but I've had to release as many as 12 halibut in our slot (45"-68") in a 2 hour soak, with 4 rods down. Them boys were busy. My theory is that the halibut find ambush spots in the rocks to grab salmon as they wash over in the current this time of the year... and they LOVE pulling big octopus out of those piles.. I had a ling a few weeks ago with 15lb king in it's stomach! A 40lb halibut had 2 pinks and a octopus in it's stomach. They are on those rocks to feed, no doubt.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 270ti View Post
    Occasional? Your fish up there must be different than our fish down here. All my big scores have come from my scent washing over and around some pretty nasty rockpiles. I rarely get halibut under 30lbs, but I've had to release as many as 12 halibut in our slot (45"-68") in a 2 hour soak, with 4 rods down. Them boys were busy. My theory is that the halibut find ambush spots in the rocks to grab salmon as they wash over in the current this time of the year... and they LOVE pulling big octopus out of those piles.. I had a ling a few weeks ago with 15lb king in it's stomach! A 40lb halibut had 2 pinks and a octopus in it's stomach. They are on those rocks to feed, no doubt.

    They most certainly do that here too, just not as many anymore in that particular spot.

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    Its not worth if for a longliner to set gear in the rocks here for a few big fish. Too much tide here and too few big ones. My expereince here has been as Matt said, covered up with rockfish, lings, yelloweyes and a few hog halibut. Just doesn't fill the fish hold and makes for too much work, unless you are trying to get your by catch from a bigger trip on the way in.

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