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Thread: recurve quivers

  1. #1
    Member cjustinm's Avatar
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    Default recurve quivers

    for you recurve shooters what kind of arrow quivers do you use? Brands, number of arrows it holds, if it screws into the riser or attaches to the limbs, or maybe a carried quiver. any info or suggestions appreciated. thinking for a bear super kodiak recurve.

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    Member AKRecurveAssassin's Avatar
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    Hey, I shoot a Snell's Silent Stalker Custom take down. Back in the day Delta quiver company use to be awesome, but the delta factory burned down and Bear archery picked it back up and bought out the business and now sells them as Fred Bear Custom Recurve 7 Arrow Quiver. it bolts into inserts into your riser. remember, with any kind of slide on quiver you will be taking some performance out of your bow. I use this exact same quiver and the guy who built my bow has been putting these on his custom bows for over 20 years now. they are AWESOME and hold up through everything. for extended huntes i put arrows into all seven slots but for shorter hunts i will go with 5 most of the time. take a look at them, it is an unbeatable quiver.
    the http://www.3riversarchery.com/Fred+B..._baseitem.html

  3. #3

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    I use a quiver called a Stick Quiver made by Selway. It works good for me. I'm not sure where you can get it. I bought it years ago at Fletcher's Archery back when Jerry Fletcher was still in the archery business. I would imagine you could google it. It slides over the limbs and works great for hunting. Here is a picture of the quiver on my bow.

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    I use the safari Back quiver and it is awsome, protects your arrows, silient, easy access to arrows, the one draw back is putting an arrow back in quiver I have to take it off my back, but this is truely a worthy investment.

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    I use a Great Northern on my TD Blacktail. I have the quick detachable mounts on the limb bolts. It has a stiff steal wire that slides into a hole on the QD mounts so you can take it on and off very eaisly. QD mounts have a screw you turn with your fingers to tighten. Never had it come loose while shooting at the range or hunting. I shoot at least 3 days a week and take down the bow and remove the quiver each time so it gets a lot of use. It'll hold 5 arrows. Very light too. Not sure about the mounting for a one piece but pretty sure that have one for it. Hope this helps...

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    Member cjustinm's Avatar
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    thanks for the input guys. im still a little undecided but im looking at the different ones you guys are using.

  7. #7

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    have you considered other styles of quivers? I had the selway bolt on on a bob lee and though I liked it (convenient) I didn't care for the weight. I really don't like bow quivers on longbows due to the weight.

    You could try a great northern strap on style quiver, they are lighter, hold 5. add the piggy backers for a small game head or two.

    I carry the great northern as a side quiver when I'm not carrying my chief side stalker quiver. Look at Dean Torges's page. I don't believe Jack makes the chief model anymore, the ones I'm seeing aren't as beefed up. They take some getting used too and I don't carry mine roving, I really dislike it for plinking. I don't carry the great northern either for roving, preferring a back quiver. When it comes to hunting, one of them are my go to's and have for a lot of years now.

    I also have a GFA quiver. The joys of traveling and hunting. The stores down south are full of crap I really don't need haha. Actually that's my excuse for forgetting mine , I swear TSA pulled it out, bummer we had to go to the bow store lol. Over all its a good quiver. Its basically Freds bow quiver slung like I sling the great northern. I had to make some mods on the rubber to hold onto a 23/64 woodie. A guy shooting carbon or 11/32 woods you're fine. I do question it when it gets cold, that rubber getting hard as a rock. Its stiff in warm weather.

    The 2 good feathers on the GFA is it holds 7, with a piggy backer you could carry enough small game heads for a 2 week hunt and the quiver is "Dan Proof". I'm harder on gear than I am on friends and so far I haven't destroyed it yet. Its the main feature over using a great northern strap on as a side quiver I like. The rod is solid from the hood to the rubber bracket, plus its more adjustable.

    A buddy of mine showed me how to sling a cheap plastic one with some 550 cord like the GFA quiver back in the late 90's. He was using an old bear quiver (he's a bear nut) Again it takes getting used too (really just feels odd for a bit) but once you use it the way we hunt, you wont likely go back! They work fine in trees and blinds also but are premo for stalking imho! in trees I hang them off a fanny pack strapped to the tree or a piece of cord wrapped around it with a loop works good also. It doesn't matter if you have a pack on or your crawling its easy once you get the hang of not having a bowquiver. Its just a downright convenient way to carry arrows all the way around. (slung Lakota style that is).

    if you get the raptor or chief side quivers, I added a foam plug in the opening to keep the feathers separated. Spent a few days in camp the year Dean T and Jay Campbell came up caribou hunting and listened to the two go round and round about it. Cut a foam plug to fit and cut some notches out of the sides to slide your bh's through. Insert plug and load it up. I carry 5 bh's and 2 small game heads in the lower hole.

    Jack is that a wes Wallace?

    AKRA, you mentioned by mounting a bow quiver you're taking performance out....explain? I dislike the weight, noise, and the profile you get when trying to move on game with a bow quiver. They are handy and convenient though.

  8. #8
    Member AKRecurveAssassin's Avatar
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    Trad, I mentioned that mounting a slide on style quiver onto your limbs can take performance out of your bow. The reasoning behind it is this: A slide on quiver is mounted where on the bow? On the limbs correct? What happens when this is done? It gives resistance to the limbs, when the limbs are confronted with an object which is foreign to them it is going to give resistance. When you draw the bow back you flex the limbs, and when you release those limbs from the pressure they de-flex and snap back into place after firing the arrow. With a quiver slid onto your limbs, it will decrease the maximum output of your limbs performance. it isnt much, but it will decrease your bows performance, guaranteed. It isn't going to be a huge or even large difference in performance, but it will most definitely decrease your fps.

    Here is the analogy: If I bend back a tall slender tree and then release it, it goes back to its original position as quickly as it can. now, take the same tree and bend it down again, then put 20 pounds on it, and let it snap back into position. The speed difference isn't going to be noticeable to the human eye, but there will be a difference. The same mechanics are at work in this analogy as with the bow.

    A quiver which you mount to the side of your handle, such as the one that i shoot, will not decrease your bows performance whatsoever. It will add a minuscule amount of weight to your bow which yes can cause a counter-weight, but any archer should be able to shoot with a slight counterweight to their bow. Figure 7000 grains to a pound, add the weight of 7 arrows at 550 grains (my setup) 7*550= 3850 grains or 8.8 ounces, combine that with the weight of the particular quiver that I shoot, which is 9.5 ounces, and I have barely one pound extra on my bow. I can shoot my bow with or without the quiver mounted to the side of my riser and when I do switch from mounted to un-mounted, there is no difference in my shooting.

    I am a firm believer in different strokes for different folks and that there is more than one way to saddle a horse. some stuff works for some people, and other stuff does not, just like one shooting style for traditional archery works for one and another for someone else.

  9. #9

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    it would be interesting to see how much you'd loose. I'm sure that's dependent on bowlimb and also quiver design. Either way I wont have one lol. Something like a Chastain with a limb that doesn't bend by the riser, vs say my lee, would likely loose little to nothing. Where my Lee in comparison would likely loose a bit. The tree analogy works and makes sense, to a point. But its application at the base of a tree depending (not the top) on the tree would really bring into question how much it would effect it, my guess would be the length of the lever and its application of power, and in todays bows they are far from equal (parabolic tapers that is).

    That 1 lb on a 1.5lb bow is a LOT imho lol! for me its more of a feel than an issue in shooting, I'm gonna suck with both . My old lee with the laminated impregnated riser is heavy. The minute I took that quiver off it never went back on. Convenient, but I really dislike them for hunting, mind you that's after a few years with one. Keep in mind I'm a longbow guy now but even as a curve shooter I disliked them. I've got quivers if someone wants to run them through the ringers, backs quivers, bow quivers, and side quivers you're more than welcomed to try them. I'm in north pole, just holler. Just remember if you try a side quiver, don't expect to get all warm and fuzzy with one use, they take time to get used too and adjusted right.

    Definatly different strokes for different folks, we're all different, we al hunt differently, and our likes are different, its what keeps the bowyers in buiz, and the quivers I mentioned are not the easiest to get along with in the beginning and for some they never will be. You see a lot of guys selling them, more so treestand guys down south than stalkers. For all around hunting and the kind of hunting we do 90% of the time I personally really like them. They took a couple years of tinkering with to really like them. The nice part is you can easily build one to try out with some 550 cord and just about any one piece quiver with minimal work though you may need to drill a hole in the hood to accept the 550 cord, I usually drill two in the old plastic one piece style quivers. My GN I just tie it on. It takes some farting around to get things where you want it....and than you end up adjusting (possibly) it for fall vs cold weather hunting so I leave a loop in mine which is 8 or so extra inches. When I want more, I untie the loop and wamo, when I want less, I pull the loop bigger. Its more for the late oct early nov bou hunts. I can swap it on my back, my side, on my back pack, in my hand, it weighs nothing, there's no profile on my bow, still convenient to use and I can easily take it off when ever I want. crawling can be tricky till you find the sweet spot. just a different tool for those that want another one to use.

    The real benefits I've had is the lack of a profile on the bow. Its not uncommon as much as it is, that I'm faced in the perfect position for the shot. I feel having a flag of arrows moving around was a dead give away, both in the tree and on the ground. Mind you I'm shooting an almost 6' bow. But try it sometime, have someone sit in the brush at an angle and slowly turn to you as if you were the game animal, its not the color its the profile we were looking at. Not to mention during said movement I have a habit of snagging on everything with a bowquiver. I feel I can get in tighter spots and still make the shot, again no arrows brushing on brush if I need to reposition/move it for a shot.

    bow quivers are for sure convenient, handy and always right there, but there is a ton of good ways to skin it this was my experiences and recommendations, take them or leave them.

  10. #10
    Member AKRecurveAssassin's Avatar
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    Haha, I'm glad you caught my disclaimer Trad. And I definitely see your point in putting the weight at the bottom of the tree, and that was my original thought. Funny how you say things in your head and then you think you've said them out loud or typed them. hahahaha. anyways, like i said, it wont be a huge difference, it may be as small as 5 fps even, I've tried it with all different kinds of slide on quivers and I saw my bow performance decrease with the slide on quivers on the limbs. not by much, but it did decrease, and hey, us trad guys gotta do whatever we can to keep the energy up right lol!!!! yes, i am holding another pound and change in my hand, but maybe its just because I"m so used to it now that it doesn't effect me? and as far as going through the brush, i cant really think of an instance where the quiver has made it harder for me to stalk through the brush or anything. I will take your advice and have a friend sit in the woods and watch me shoot and move and see if he notices the quiver moving. My amo one my one bow in my avatar is 58" and my other bow is 62". I love my quiver, and everyone will like something different and find something different to their tastes. I think it is awesome that you found a quiver that works for you and that you like and can make work so perfectly, it sounds like you really have a heck of a setup.

  11. #11

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    I swear it, if there's one twig to catch those feathers would rake it every time! Just my luck though, Capt. Smith was my great great granddads uncle, sink the unsinkable .

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