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Thread: gloves for float hunts ?

  1. #1
    Member AKMarmot's Avatar
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    Default gloves for float hunts ?

    What kind of gloves work best for rowing in windy cold conditions? In my younger years I didn't realize I needed them, but no that I am getting softer warm hands are nice. I have tried the neoprene that you can get for $25 @ wallys & other places over the years & all they did was make my hands sweat & get colder after awhile. In addition to that on multiple day floats once they get wet from sweat & water when continually taking on & off they never dry out the rest of the trip.
    Any good suggestions?

  2. #2
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    I bring several types and change out as conditions warrant. And I sometimes use the same gloves off the river. Leather is usually out because its difficult to dry, but leather work gloves are hard to beat in the Devil's Club. On the river I usually wear either neoprene if its wet / windy, or synthetic with some kind of grip palms if it's buggy. My core temperature keeps my hands warm enough when I'm rowing that I usually don't need gloves for warmth.

    Some guys have a lot of trouble with chapping when it's cold, wet and windy, and that leads to split and bleeding knuckles. I don't have that issue, due to oily skin. But if you do, you might try Bag Balm or even lanolin, to keep your hands dry and your skin pliable.

    Have you seen the selection of gloves offered by Northwest River Supplies? Probably the best variety of rafting gloves on the market.

    In summary, I'd bring a variety of at least three different types so you can adjust to changing circumstances.

    Mike
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    The last few years, I have used Outdoor Research Stormcell gloves. They are a bit on the pricey side, but work great, at least for me. They have a good grip in the fingers/palm areas, have a Gore-Tex liner, and are a synthetic leather glove. Here is a link to them at Altrec: http://www.altrec.com/outdoor-resear...rmcell-gloves/ These gloves may not be for everyone, but I have used them on three float hunts and they are still going strong.

  4. #4

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    I use wool gloves for cooler days, but for rowing i prefer a cheap pair of Mechanics Gloves like you'd find at NAPA or Lowe's. If moose hunting I use full leather work gloves (non-insulated). I usually take all three types and switch out as the conditions demand. Early morning floats you'll want the wool, warm days you'll prefer the mechanics glove, and for hard work and packing meat...leather.

    I agree with neoprene NRS goves...too much sweat and stink.

    larry

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    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    EXPERIENCE = WISDOM: A lot of experience in the first few posts already. They've probably seen the gamut of glove options and settled on their favorites. Alaska Lanche suggested in another thread (http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ghlight=gloves) the Chily Grip gloves by Red Steer - I've had good luck in a range of conditions with these and like the ventilated backs in most conditions. PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS: all kinds of gloves out there, which mighty suggest no one glove is best for all conditions and personal preferences. Sometimes (wet cold rowing), only a neoprene glove will do, but when the inside gets wet, they get hard to doff/don, then lose insulation - so depending on one's tolerance for cold hands, might take extras. I like neoprene Glacier Grips but often carry a long, waterfowler's glove that slides over my main glove in case of relentless rain. Gloves can get spendy, but having two pairs of less expensive gloves makes some sense to me. Having a reliable heat source for drying gear or weight restrictions on your trip and the other personal variables like the skin chaffing/cracking issue that Mike mentioned are worth considering too. 'Course sometimes, nothing works ("There is no Miracle glove for sure..." - alaskachuck"). - more info: http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...loves-and-rain,

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    Member AKMarmot's Avatar
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    Thanks for the thread reference. My wife bought a few pairs of the chil grip gloves last winter, & for the most part I can't stand them. They just dont' work for me. However like you mentioned the best solution is probably a couple different pairs & change out when needed.

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    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKMarmot View Post
    ... & for the most part I can't stand them...
    ... that's great. No Magic glove, right? I started hunting, fly fishing and rafting after coming to this Great State in 2000; pretty much 100% noob. What I "figured out" for gloves on my first hunt... made a bag (day pack really) full of different gloves. Ridiculous. Good thing we were flying a Jetcraft instead of a Super Cub! Now, more often I look at what experienced friends do and just try that first. Simpler. Figuring out what characteristics about each glove (ventilation in wool or Mechanix or Chilly Grips, good grip surface, abrasion-puncture resistance, etc) and I guess fit too - takes us to our ultimate choices. Glove-fail stories are good too. Those involving Devils-Club-fail must be real good lessons. Good luck.

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    Member TWB's Avatar
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    I wore these last year and they were legit! Warm, waterproof, great grip. Merino, didn't stink.


    http://barneyssports.com/clothing/me...ino-glove.html
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

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