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Thread: Which Anchor for sport fishing ?

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    Member Micky_Ireland's Avatar
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    Default Which Anchor for sport fishing ?

    Which is the best anchor available for coastal Alaska ? Also I was thinking of adding an electric windlass as a nice add on for my upcoming boat. Im aware that there is some fantastic manufacturers . Whats the pro's and con's on the electric method ?

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    After several decades with Mr. Danforth, I finally made the acquaintance of Mr. Bruce. With the quick release rig for hangups, I'll never go back. They hold on bottoms that used to skid my Danforths, and knock wood, I'm yet to lose one in a rock pile.

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    Member agp's Avatar
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    claw anchor. but i guess that depends on the size of your boat. i retrieve anchor by hand or by buoy so no advice on windlass.

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    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    Claw anchor holds where the danforth had trouble in the past.
    Lewmar works for us but is not the best option.....beats the bouy or hand method though.
    BK

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    I've used a Bruce style anchor from Lewmar and it's worked quite well for fishing. If you're in an area with really thick kelp you won't be able to get a solid set for the night or heading to shore, but certainly good enough to fish from. I believe you're looking at a 28' boat so with a 10 kilo anchor and another 20 kilos or so of chain I'd say an electric windlass would almost be a must, but having a buoy and ring for a backup wouldn't be a bad idea. Having a spare anchor and rode is also not a bad idea.

    I can't think of any downside of a windlass and I'd love to put one on my boat, just don't have the funds for one at the moment. The main thing is to make sure your rode, chain and connections are compatable with whatever windlass you choose and it's probably not a bad idea to go one size larger than is recomended. Also pick one that can be operated from the helm.

    Being able to drop anchor from the helm while watching your depth and chart is a huge advantage over leaving the helm, running to the bow to drop anchor and hoping you haven't drifted off course. Not to mention pulling anchor is much easier and you're more likely to reset the anchor in an area if you find you're slightly off where you want to be vs. thinking it's too much of a pain to use the buoy and keep fishing a less than ideal spot.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

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    Bruce is the best for Alaskan Waters hand down. Ive fished and sailed on all kinds of boats and of all sizes. Bruce is tried and true. You have a couple ways of setting it up so when in rocky water you are able to release the anchor instead of loosing it or setting it up for muddy silty bottom.
    Piscor Ergo Sum

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    Member redleader's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Micky_Ireland View Post
    I was thinking of adding an electric windlass as a nice add on for my upcoming boat. Im aware that there is some fantastic manufacturers . Whats the pro's and con's on the electric method ?
    Nice when they work but with heavy use they won't last long.

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    Member Micky_Ireland's Avatar
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    As regards electrical power to the windlass. Do they have a very negative effect on the battery power and their ultimate life span. I would be quite sure they would be quite heavy on the energy usage. Has there been problems in this regard ?..............thanks

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    So long as the elecrical system is properly sized, they'll be no problem. With the engines running you'll be mostly running off the power of the engines alternator, not the battery.

    I'd say spend a bit more and get a drum windlass.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Micky_Ireland View Post
    As regards electrical power to the windlass. Do they have a very negative effect on the battery power and their ultimate life span. I would be quite sure they would be quite heavy on the energy usage. Has there been problems in this regard ?..............thanks
    Id say make sure you have a stainless steel 6 inch ring and a real big buoy just in case that thing craps out on you!
    Piscor Ergo Sum

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    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    So long as the elecrical system is properly sized, they'll be no problem. With the engines running you'll be mostly running off the power of the engines alternator, not the battery.

    I'd say spend a bit more and get a drum windlass.
    Agree completely. Set up correctly, no issues.
    BK

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    Member hoose35's Avatar
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    Bruce Anchor hands down. I have a capstan on my boat and it works fine, but 90% of the time I use a buoy and ring because it is faster. I have a big stainless ring that stays on my line permanetely, and I have one of those split rings that you can slide over the line as a backup. Like Franken Fish said, be sure to have a ring/buoy set up for back up in case your electric puller fails, and it will eventually. Pulling a 22-33lb anchor and 30' of chain up from 300' would be a chore, take the fun right out of boating.
    Responsible Conservation > Political Allocation

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    Member Micky_Ireland's Avatar
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    Thanks guys. ill be packing a parachute all the time , even with the windlass.

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    Sponsor potbuilder's Avatar
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    Bruce anchor one size bigger than needed with lots of chain this would be my "sleeping on" anchor and rigging. Windlass just buy a GOOD brand windlass(http://www.goodwindlass.com/) they look to be pretty bombproof. For fishing i'd set myself up with a nice grapple made of lead/cement filled pipe with prongs made of steel rod or rebar, throw it in any rockpile you like if it hangs down just cleat it off and tow it out, the prongs will straighten out to come loose and all you have to do is bend them back into shape to fish the next rockpile. If you do hang it down so bad you can't get it out and bust it off no big deal/expense just make up another one.

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    Member Micky_Ireland's Avatar
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    Thanks potbuilder. Great advice as always...............thanks

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