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Thread: Fire On My Boat

  1. #1

    Default Fire On My Boat

    I was out last week and doing ok on shrimp. I decided to saute some coonstripes and onions on my Coleman stove. All started well, but then the flame suddenly reduced by 1/2 or more in volume so I shut down the burner to check things out. As soon as the burner was doused, I heard a hissing so I immediately unscrewed the fuel canister. About 2 seconds later, flames start rolling out from under the stove and singed both my arms up to my elbows. I always keep a water soaked towel next to me when I use the stove and was able to extinguish the flames...but they didn't want to give up easily. The housing that is normally cool to the touch even after a long cooking session was hot as heck and melted through my KiwiGrip top coat and into the fiberglass. It was easy to fix but it was a big surprise all at once. The wet towel saved the day. There is only a plastic sleeve and an O ring in that assembly but one or both failed. The stove is pretty much destroyed...but at least I didn't have to swim for shore.

  2. #2

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    Ouch, sorry to hear that! Fuel or propane??? I haven't used a fuelie Coleman in 20 years because of fire problems.


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  3. #3
    Sponsor potbuilder's Avatar
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    glad to hear your ok, if that fiberglass would caught fire you would of had big problems.

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  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by AK2AZ View Post
    Ouch, sorry to hear that! Fuel or propane??? I haven't used a fuelie Coleman in 20 years because of fire problems.
    Propane. Those fuelies are/were notrious for flare ups if you cranked them up too soon!

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by potbuilder View Post
    glad to hear your ok, if that fiberglass would caught fire you would of had big problems.
    So true! I was about to pitch it overboard. A lot of fuel built up quickly in the void under the burners. I've seen stuff like that get exponentially worse in seconds. I was spooked but damage was minimal...basically 4 holes to fill and resurface the general area.

  6. #6
    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    Dang, scary stuff for sure. I'm thinking I would have pitched that sucker overboard!
    Glad to hear it worked out for you with minimal damage.
    BK

  7. #7

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    I emailed the US distributor for KiwiGrip in regards to flammability and received this reply

    Hi Gary -

    I've attached our MSDS which addresses this.


    In my testing, getting KG to burn is difficult. It melts first and then subsequently boils off before the last bits of coagulated material will ignite with the help of a propane torch.


    Cheers, /w


    Willy
    Pachena, LLC
    206-306-2222

    I like this product ( its a non slip product by design) and put down a good layer on the deck and gunnels...I believe it had a whole lot to do with my good outcome...not cheap but neither is seeing your boat go up in flames. I also contacted Coleman to see if my stove model had a component failure or a recall history. The customer service rep said my model was still in production and had virtually no history. She offered to replace the stove at no cost to me even though it was out of warranty. Of course, I accepted. She called back later and asked if they paid the return shipping, if I would be willing to ship my burnt stove back to them for close examination and stressed that they were going to replace my stove even if I declined. I accepted. I got lucky on this one as I was prepared for a problem with a wet towel and fortunate to have applied a top coat that by nature, doesn't ignite easily.

  8. #8
    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
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    I like Colemans response so far. They might oughta kick in for some of the repair also. Kudos for you having a wet towel handy. I am going to start doing that.
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  9. #9
    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    Decided to get nostalgic and use a 1978 coleman peak 1 lightweight stove. The seal on the burner valve was leaking to the extent that a small flame could be seen all around the little adjustment handle. When I attempted to shut off the stove, it turned into a fireball that singed my arms, face, and hands. I threw it in the nearby creek. The rapid temp change blew the fuel cap off the little stove, it exploded on the surface of the water, instantly throwing flames that looked like a small atom bomb. If fished it out of the creek, it's now a nostalgic shelf ornament.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by bullbuster View Post
    I like Colemans response so far. They might oughta kick in for some of the repair also. Kudos for you having a wet towel handy. I am going to start doing that.
    The cynical side of me said "they want this out of my hands and gone asap" but I'm not the litigious sort and feel blessed that my little boat that I've worked so hard on didn't end up looking like an over sized, over done, semi floating toasted cheese sandwich. Repairs took little time/materials...cure time more than anything. I'll say the wet towel is a brilliant and cost free idea that came from a contractor I use to build pacific crest trail for in the 70's. He said if he ever showed up in camp and there wasn't a big wet towel in a bucket of water by a working stove, whomever was in charge of cooking would be fired on the spot! No one was ever dumb enough to test him!

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by mainer_in_ak View Post
    Decided to get nostalgic and use a 1978 coleman peak 1 lightweight stove. The seal on the burner valve was leaking to the extent that a small flame could be seen all around the little adjustment handle. When I attempted to shut off the stove, it turned into a fireball that singed my arms, face, and hands. I threw it in the nearby creek. The rapid temp change blew the fuel cap off the little stove, it exploded on the surface of the water, instantly throwing flames that looked like a small atom bomb. If fished it out of the creek, it's now a nostalgic shelf ornament.
    Wow! Thanks for posting. Sounds almost exactly like what happened with me except with my model, you can't visually inspect what's going on due to it being a blind fitting...the connection is beyond a hole in the side of the stove housing. You just get the big surprise!

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