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Thread: Fly-fishing Cresent Lake on the Kenai

  1. #1

    Default Fly-fishing Cresent Lake on the Kenai

    Hiked/biked back to Cresent lake with my float tube yesterday and had not fished this in many years. My last trip (11 years ago) was not too shabby from shore, so this time I wanted to get out on the lake. There was some really nice grayling surfacing, but I could not get a single strike all day. Threw all sorts of dries at them and even some nymphs...nothing! Anyone out there know what is needed? Many thanks!

  2. #2
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    Could be the grayling were keyed in on tiny diptera. I would try a size 18 Griffith's Gnat.

    Jim

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    My daughter and her friends walked up a few weeks ago. She was using a spinner and couldn't catch any. I guess a couple guys were working flies and caught a couple grayling. She said the "mayflies" (?) were thick, (she was told they were mayflies, do we have mayflies up here?), so she plucked one off of somebody, put it on a hook and caught one.....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    If they were diptera, there's every chance they were picking the larvae right under the surface. Worth a try with Zebra Midges under a dropper anyway. There are mayflies up here, but I would expect them in the outlet creek rather than the lake. I had a couple of days of the most outrageous stonefly dry fishing there in the creek a few years back. Never saw stoneflies so big up here, but they were right between #6 and #4. Fortunately I had some with me. Based on that, I'd be tempted to use a Stimmie for my indicator with the Zebra midges.

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    If they were diptera, there's every chance they were picking the larvae right under the surface. Worth a try with Zebra Midges under a dropper anyway. There are mayflies up here, but I would expect them in the outlet creek rather than the lake. I had a couple of days of the most outrageous stonefly dry fishing there in the creek a few years back. Never saw stoneflies so big up here, but they were right between #6 and #4. Fortunately I had some with me. Based on that, I'd be tempted to use a Stimmie for my indicator with the Zebra midges.
    She just informed me that they were indeed fishing in the creek.....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  6. #6

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    That stonefly hatch I enjoyed about 15 years ago was on July 6 and 7, so could be. It was interesting, because just after lunch we saw this gray "ribbon" coming down out of the lake. Turned out to be a bunch of big grayling. Within about half an hour of their arrival the stonefly hatch started and ran for an hour. When it was over the grayling formed up in their ribbon and swam back up into the lake. Happened both days we were there.

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    I was camped 3 nights last week about 21-23rd. I caught about 20 but it was slow compared to years past. Around the islands was best and the creek i could visually see about 40 grayling but very few would actually bite. I caught all mine on panther martin spinners. Yellow with red dots. All at creek were small, 12". I caught a 19" at the islands.


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    Member Raffpappy's Avatar
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    I ran into a similar situation in an interior lake last year. Lots of grayling cruising the bank, but no takes. After several attempts with dries, nymphs, emergers, float line, sink line, etc over a course of 2 hours, I found they were receptive to a size 18 zebra midges in both olive in black fished just under the surface. I would let it sink for 15-20 seconds then begin a very slow, inch at a time retrieve. Who'd have thunk grayling would be selective, huh?

  9. #9

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    Thanks everyone for the info...I guess I have been spoiled over the years and didn't give grayling much credit, (usually I threw anything I wanted and had a blast); or extremely lucky. Looks like I will need to expand my fly collection, don't need much of an excuse to do that! Thanks again everyone. If anyone has any Butte Creek inform, it would be appreciated. Was up there a few weekends ago and had a good time, but once I got back to the creek I didn't know whether to go upstream or down (towards the Big Su). I went up and caught a good share ranging from 12-16...maybe the biggest went 17; but read a post on here a few years back that they had some real hogs in there somewhere.

  10. #10

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    P.S. I looked at the creek on the way out, where in the world do you fish that?! All the water I looked at was moving way to fast (IMO).

  11. #11

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    They spread out from the outlet downstream for maybe the first 50 yards. I'm talking about walking in from the Cooper Landing side, not to the other way in.

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    Member DannerAK's Avatar
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    Chironomids
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