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Thread: Shrimp Bait Question

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    Default Shrimp Bait Question

    We are tourists and avid fishermen, and are trying our luck at Alaskan Shrimping in Port Valdez. Since we are pulling pots by hand, we are only using two pots, and I have a question on how to use the bait pellets in the shrimp pot. I'm using a handful of pellets in an orange Scotty container which swell to fill the container about 2/3 full when wet. How often should I replace the bait with fresh pellets? We're pulling the pots about each 24 hours and are getting about 24-35 shrimp per pot per pull.

    Thanks in advance for any help.

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    Member OKElkHunter's Avatar
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    First off, if you aren't a resident, I believe you may be breaking the law by shrimping. Only residents can legally shrimp in PWS and you need a permit. If you are legal, I usually just add a few fresh pellets to my bait each day for a couple of days and then change them out after 2 days.
    “Don't expect to build up the weak by pulling down the strong." ~Calvin Coolidge~

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    I'm pretty sure shrimping is open to anyone who has a license and permit, it is not a personal use fishery.

    As to bait, while the pellets will stay in the bait jar for several days, I believe they are less effective after 48 hours so either add more, or swap them out. You can add salmon roe and or herring to your bait jar and might find it helps, especially pellets that've already been soaked. If you've been catching salmon, try hanging a salmon head from the top of the pot. Sometimes I find a salmon head or herring hanging in the pot makes for a much fuller pot than pellets only, sometimes no real benefit.
    Last edited by Paul H; 07-26-2013 at 11:24.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

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    I often have left over herring from halibut fishing that has gone soft and no longer suitable for halibut. So, I'll add one of those herring to a bait jar after the pellets have soaked a day.

    I saw a good piece of advice on here a long time ago. A guy said the point is to BAIT the shrimp, not FEED the shrimp. After that, I stopped filling the bait jars with fresh pellets every time I pulled. Now, I do just fine on my shrimp takes and don't use half the pellets I used to. Those pellets ain't cheap.

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    Member OKElkHunter's Avatar
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    Page 63 of the regulation, it says AK Residents ONLY (N Gulf Coast). The reg is a little confusing as to whether Shrimping is sport or personal use. I would err on the resident only side, but this is probably a question for a trooper. I have always been under the impression that it is a resident only fishery.
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    I'm pretty sure shrimping is open to anyone who has a license and permit, it is not a personal use fishery.

    As to bait, while the pellets will stay in the bait jar for several days, I believe they are less effective after 48 hours so either add more, or swap them out. You can add salmon roe and or herring to your bait jar and might find it helps, especially pellets that've already been soaked. If you've been catching salmon, try hanging a salmon head from the top of the pot. Sometimes I find a salmon head or herring hanging in the pot makes for a much fuller pot than pellets only, sometimes no real benefit.
    “Don't expect to build up the weak by pulling down the strong." ~Calvin Coolidge~

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OKElkHunter View Post
    Page 63 of the regulation, it says AK Residents ONLY (N Gulf Coast). The reg is a little confusing as to whether Shrimping is sport or personal use. I would err on the resident only side, but this is probably a question for a trooper. I have always been under the impression that it is a resident only fishery.
    I'm not sure about the N Gulf Coast fishery, but for the Prince William Sound fishery (which this post is concerning), it is a sport fishery and non-residents are allowed to participate. There is a box to check right on the top right corner of the permit that denotes resident or non-resident status.

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    I see where it says "North Gulf Coast Personaly Use Shrimp - Alaska Residents Only" but I guess I am not seeing where it talks about PWS and non-residents. It shows the PWS season open April15-Sepember 15. This is on page 63 but I am viewing it online. Is there something different you are seeing? I just want to be sure I am not missing something as a non-res that has been shrimping before out of Valdez.

    http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/static/re...cshellfish.pdf

    Edit: Nevermind. I see Brian responded and the response above has been amended.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    The North Gulf Coast p/u shrimping area you reference on page 63 is from Gore Point to Cape Fairfield. That is not the same fishery as PWS shrimping, which I assume the op is fishing out of Valdez. The PWS shrimping is sport harvest (unless you can cite otherwise), and hence open to non residents with a license and permit.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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    Member OKElkHunter's Avatar
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    I have been lookig at the reg and it does appear that PWS is a sport fishery and open to non residents for shrimp. So, go for it and i appologize if I confused anyone other than myself. But, you can never be too safe, "ignorance of the law is no excuse".
    “Don't expect to build up the weak by pulling down the strong." ~Calvin Coolidge~

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    I'm not sure about the N Gulf Coast fishery, but for the Prince William Sound fishery (which this post is concerning), it is a sport fishery and non-residents are allowed to participate. There is a box to check right on the top right corner of the permit that denotes resident or non-resident status.
    Yep, and I made a call to the F&G biologist to confirm it. Thanks for your concern, though.

    Also, thanks for the hints on the pellets.

    We were told that there's a lot of sea lice that accumulate on the cat foods, herring pieces and other "homemade" style bait here in Valdez, so we went with a small bucket of pellets just for our first try. Now if I can just keep the pots away from the seine netters, I'll be OK. We pulled the pots today an hour before a seine opener. I'm not exaggerating, there must have been 200 net boats within a mile of Allison Point at noon today, and we passed another 6 heading there as we pulled out.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    I'm not so sure I buy the argument that pellets only will keep the sea lice out. I've run pellets only and had sea lice pouring out of the bait jar in one location and very few sea lice in another location. Typically I hang the herring or salmon head from a piece of gangion line. And some theorize that sea lice are your friends and their actions on your bait helps increase the scent field to bring in the shrimp.

    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    Yep - I like the lice - I think it "muddies the water" with bait scent better. The go good with sechwan chicken too!

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