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Thread: Eating Salmon Eggs

  1. #1
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    Default Eating Salmon Eggs

    Does anyone use the Red eggs to eat? I would assume they have lots of good stuff in them. We have been making soup with the eggs and boiling down the salmon skeletons to make soup and straining the bones out. We also tried blending the eggs and freezing for salmon chowder stock and it turned out great.

    I watch so many people filleting their salmon at the river and wasting so much because they don't know how to fillet and it makes me sick. As far as I know I'd love to have salmon saved up for the winter more than ground hamburger that costs so much and who knows what is in it. Also, so many throw away the bellies and I save them for the smoker.

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    A friend cures sockeye (and other salmon) eggs a variety of ways. He uses miso and saki in some, and others he uses other sources of salts, etc. I've eaten them, and they're not bad. I also know of folks who used to fry perch eggs and other fresh water fish eggs with corn meal (mid-west Native breakfast among some of the folks I knew there). It's an acquired taste, in my opinion, but not a new idea by an stretch of the imagination. If you like the flavor, and have a safe way of either preserving or preparing them, have at it!

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    Member LIVIN907's Avatar
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    I've tried smoking them and frying them with eggs. I found they were too fishy for my taste, but the dogs loved them with their breakfast. Remember if you are going to try and process some keep them away from metal as they tend to absurb that metallic taste.

  4. #4

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    I just got finished making my very first batch of salmon caviar. This post is the method I used:

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ll=1#post25010

    I've got the eggs in the fridge now in the strainer. I'll try them tomorrow............

    I've fried burbot eggs. Not bad, but not super great, either. Hooligan eggs and milt are good fried.

    I'll try fried salmon eggs before fall.........

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    When frying, you just can't get them sunny-side up....

    you need to fry thoroughly, or the fish taste comes out a little too strongly for me.
    Plus, I like the texture of "well" cook eggs.

    Simply roll in seasoned flour, and fry in Crisco seems too easy.
    Butter also works very good.

    Enjoy,
    Chris

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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Silver eggs are supposed to be the best. Can't say that's true as those are the only type I've tried, but they were very good. My experience has been with the Russian method of curing them to "Ikura".

    Ditto on metal contact (after the separation mesh). Also, never use city water in the curing processes as the chlorine will ruin them. The eggs must be cured immediately after removal from the fish. They must be kept chilled at all times. They spoil fast and easy, so you have to be all setup and ready to go when you clean the fish. If you're hooking the fish, you should bleed them and then place them on ice (sprinkled with rock salt) in the whole. Get your egg cure ready to go prior to cleaning. They cure in a 100% saturated salt brine for 8 minutes after removal from the skein. You use a piece of stainless steel mesh (1/4") over a small plastic bucket to separate the eggs. Basically, remove from fish, slice open skein to expose eggs, then gently rub the egg side over the mesh to separate the eggs and let them drop into the bucket. When you have all the eggs in the bucket from all your fish, dump them into your brine solution and start your stopwatch. At 8 minutes, dump them through a plastic colander bowl to drain off the brine. Shake off any remaining liquid, dump them into plastic or glass containers and put them directly into the fridge. They need to be consumed within about a month.

    A good serving recipe is to take a spoonful of eggs, hit it with some olive oil and cracked pepper. Serve it on small slices of dinner bread. It's very good.
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    Member fishNphysician's Avatar
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    Default Gave it a whirl yesterday with fresh steelhead...

    STEELHEAD CAVIAR…. start to finish

    1) Catch fresh bonkable (AHFMD) steelhead…. NOTE: preferably female





    2) Best if it has sufficient weight to be a bonafide egg wagon…





    3) Sufficiently large to yield enough roe to make the effort worth while





    4) Lay skein out on a board covered with paper towel. Towel keeps the whole works from sliding around and absorbs any blood-stained fluids.





    5) Carefully strip individual eggs from the skein membrane with a spoon, then transfer all the eggs into a 1-quart COLD saturated brine of pickling salt. (Sorry, shoulda had Parker take a pic while I was doing this step)


    6) Using your hands to stir the eggs in the brine bath, remove any loose bits of "eggshell" husk, blood, and/or residual membrane as the developing caviar absorbs salt from the brine. Continue marinating until a periodic taste test yields caviar berries of desired saltiness. Perhaps 7-12 minutes.


    7) Drain caviar in a fine strainer and continue picking out any unwanted debris that stands out against the brilliant orange berries…





    8) Plate and serve….





    These were simply dolloped onto brown rice crackers (Costco) and sprinkled with finely chopped green onions. Delish! Would have been the bomb with a light spread of wasabi-laced cream cheese. (I guess that's on tomorrow's shopping list!)


    .
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    .




    FYI this post was inspired by Parker… "J F C, don't eat the bait, Doc!"
    but brought to you courtesy of met'lhead matt for putting me on one heluva nice fish, and JesseM who turned down a chance at some prime bait.
    "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
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    I eat them salted on a bagel with cream cheese or a pilot bread cracker they are good chum salmon roe from the Yukon is considered the best.



    Herring on Kelp are good too with a little salt dipped in seal oil.



    Most fish roe here is eaten from Pike to whitefish its all good.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Separate from the skein, salt, lemon juice let them sit in the fridge over night and enjoy. We probably make about 1/2 gallon of caviar each year, good stuff.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brain View Post
    I just got finished making my very first batch of salmon caviar. This post is the method I used:

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ll=1#post25010

    I've got the eggs in the fridge now in the strainer. I'll try them tomorrow............

    I've fried burbot eggs. Not bad, but not super great, either. Hooligan eggs and milt are good fried.

    I'll try fried salmon eggs before fall.........
    After reading this thread and the one linked, I was pretty excited. Man, I ended up eating so much of this. I need to go catch some more silvers because it's gone, and I didn't get around to frying any.

    Pretty labor intensive to get it separated.

    Seemed to get better after the first day r two, maybe the brine mixed in more, I don't know.

    Good stuff!

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    Try gently wrapping the finished roe in some good cheesecloth and then pop it in the smoker on low for an hour or so. Amazing!!

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    I have eaten them fried, raw, in soup, smoked and dried. I'm going to try these recipes.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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    My GF and her daughter eat any shrimp eggs we come across faster than you can shell the shrimp.
    Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day,
    Teach a man to fish and he'll also learn to drink, lie, and avoid the honey do list.

  14. #14

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    I was fishing on the Kenai with some friends from California this past summer and convinced them that its a rite of passage to take a bite of the eggs from your first salmon. Of course, I had to do it first to really sell them on it. I took a big old bite and was pleasantly surprised that they weren't half bad! Fresh sushi!

    This probably wasn't what you were asking, though, lol

  15. #15
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    Brave!

    When you clean them, you pull all of the skein material off.

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