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Thread: Fuel Dock Fire

  1. #1
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    Default Fuel Dock Fire

    ADN reporting recreational boat explosion at the Valdez fuel dock. Some injuries. Prayers to those involved.

  2. #2

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    Egad.

    Here is the link.

  3. #3
    Member jaydog's Avatar
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    Bad news, very happy that no one died. Prayers for their speedy and complete recovery. House fires are bad, boat fires even worse. Sounds like the damage was confined to a single boat.

    One of the things I like about our aluminum & diesel boat is the "relative" fire safety - but she could still burn. From an ex-firefighter - stay safe out there!

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  5. #5

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    Not knowing what caused the explosion, be sure to keep all doors, windows, etc closed while fueling, run the blower long enough after fueling, and keep all passengers off the boat whil fueling. Glad nobody died.

  6. #6
    Member Floridascuba's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skydiver View Post
    Not knowing what caused the explosion, be sure to keep all doors, windows, etc closed while fueling, run the blower long enough after fueling, and keep all passengers off the boat whil fueling. Glad nobody died.
    I would even open the hatch.

  7. #7
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    Default Vapor Sensor

    I had just left the fuel dock and this boat pulled in behind us to fuel and since then I have spent some time thinking about ways to make my boat safer. I decided it would be money well spent to add a fuel vapor sensor as an extra line of defense http://www.westmarine.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product_11151_10001_30673_-1?ci_src=14110944&ci_sku=30673&cid=sc_googlepla&de vice=c&network=g&matchtype=&gclid=CMOOwZ66yLgCFa9f QgodAzgAvQ and I will also make sure and open the door and check the engine compartment before starting. I already have one blower in the bilge but I'm thinking about adding another on the other side to increase the air movement.

    Be safe and make sure to run your blowers it is easy to forget to turn them on and it's hard to wait sometimes when you want to get going. I really like the idea of the vapor sensor because you never know when you’re going to develop aleak it's always on and checking the air and picks up at 16 to 20% LEL which is low enough it would probably be hard to smell.

  8. #8
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    Gas boat explosion/fires are not uncommon...unfortunately! We may never know the specific circumstances that created this particular accident but I'd like to share something that I discovered during a boat inspection a few years back:

    I asked the owner to turn on his bilge blower; he did so and the blower motor ran normally...as I do in every inspection, I placed my hand over the air intake and could not feel air moving. I moved to the other side of the boat and could not feel air moving out the exhaust either, so we opened the engine hatch and I visually inspected the ventilation system...I expected that the hose had fallen off the blower motor or something similar. We didn't see any discrepancies with the ventilation system and the blower was still running normally although not moving air! I got a mirror and looked under the engine at the intake hose for the blower and with the blower off, it looked normal; however, with the blower on, the suction end of the intake hose was collapsing shut and the ventilation system did not work properly. We removed the hose and the wire reinforcement inside to hose to help it maintain it's shape had rusted away and the hose would simply collapse on itself, shutting off the air flow. Since then, I look carefully at ventilation systems and always check the airflow...some boats use what appears to be regular dryer vent hose that can only (dependably) hold it's shape under positive pressure (i.e. outflow) whereas when used on the suction side, it could create a problem...combine an inoperative vent system with some gas fumes and spark; you have all the ingredients for a disaster. Boat Safer! Mike

  9. #9
    Member AKBassking's Avatar
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    I have 2 big thirsty gas engines in my Sea Ray. When fueling I follow these rules:

    1. Everyone off the boat during refueling
    2. Always make sure your tank vent line is venting air from the tank.
    3. When done fueling, I do a sniff test. I open all access doors, especially the engine compartment and smell for fuel and look for leaks.
    4. I run my blowers for a minimum of 4 minutes and also sniff the the exhaust of the blowers.
    5. I start my engines, then allow guests back on board.

    This doesn't take much time but does save yours and your love ones lives....

    ALASKAN SEA-DUCTION
    1988 M/Y Camargue YachtFisher
    MMSI# 338131469
    Blog: http://alaskanseaduction.blogspot.com/

  10. #10
    Sponsor potbuilder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CG Boating Safety View Post
    Gas boat explosion/fires are not uncommon...unfortunately! We may never know the specific circumstances that created this particular accident but I'd like to share something that I discovered during a boat inspection a few years back:

    I asked the owner to turn on his bilge blower; he did so and the blower motor ran normally...as I do in every inspection, I placed my hand over the air intake and could not feel air moving. I moved to the other side of the boat and could not feel air moving out the exhaust either, so we opened the engine hatch and I visually inspected the ventilation system...I expected that the hose had fallen off the blower motor or something similar. We didn't see any discrepancies with the ventilation system and the blower was still running normally although not moving air! I got a mirror and looked under the engine at the intake hose for the blower and with the blower off, it looked normal; however, with the blower on, the suction end of the intake hose was collapsing shut and the ventilation system did not work properly. We removed the hose and the wire reinforcement inside to hose to help it maintain it's shape had rusted away and the hose would simply collapse on itself, shutting off the air flow. Since then, I look carefully at ventilation systems and always check the airflow...some boats use what appears to be regular dryer vent hose that can only (dependably) hold it's shape under positive pressure (i.e. outflow) whereas when used on the suction side, it could create a problem...combine an inoperative vent system with some gas fumes and spark; you have all the ingredients for a disaster. Boat Safer! Mike
    Think i'd stick a short pipe of aluminum tubing or pvc pipe into the end of the vent hose to keep it rigid.

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