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Thread: capturing a hunt

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    Default capturing a hunt

    with the upcoming seasons a friendly reminder to take pics....

    many years ago I had a hunter who insisted on carrying several cameras in the field so I asked why.. He said because his late father had done a very similar sheep hunt and yet there was only one or two pics of it.. I thought to my self how sad...well almost 15 years later I have become that dad.. I looked through my pics and realize I have very few pics and there are many hunts that I have no pics of including the animals.. (we used to have to turn in our film to the boss but could get copies but I never bothered) Now that I have kids and want to share my past with them I have very little to show.. Dont get me wrong I have some just not a lot compared to the hunts I did.. I think as a guide pics were always something the hunter did not me and now look back with regret.. I think of some of the greatest things in Alaska I have seen from a 46" dall to a double rainbow over a glacier and cant show my son either.. Memories fellows..at the end of the day thats what we got.. I am lucky that I am still able to get out there but I now realize how important pics are.. OH and please clean the critters up and hide the tongues hangin out..

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    I keep buying better and better cameras because my pictures never seem to do the hunt justice. I am one step away from hauling a dslr into the field this year and plan to take a lot more than the 100 or so pics I took in 2011.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    We usually take somewhere between 100-200 pictures per hunt - less if it's a day or weekend hunt, but we're still capturing a lot of images even on those ones. The importance of this was really driven home by something my grandfather passed along to my family when he passed away. He gave us his hunting journal (from Michigan) that starts back in the late 1920s. It's an amazing piece of history complete with pictures and lengthy descriptions of that year's hunt. I'd love to pass something similar along one day.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bear View Post
    I am lucky that I am still able to get out there but I now realize how important pics are.
    I have to agree, but luckily I did take at least a couple of most my hunter's animals.....but not near enough. Believe it or not just didn't take enough on my own hunts.

    On another note.....I never thought you were that old of a guy to be able to say the above yet......unless you were maybe referring to your knee problems? I'm 57 and had knee surgery a few years ago, but I still plan on trying to at least be out there till the rest of me falls apart.......lol
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    I started packing a DSLR canon because the ability to get the best pictures in any given scenario just isn't there with the small point and shoots. I've been on hunts and taken some pics with the point and shoots only to come home and be disappointed when I get them on the computer. So with the DSLR, it's a bit heavier, 27 oz, but it is well worth it when I have high quality beautiful pictures to share. This year I also bought a canon video camera, the thing is tiny and the video quality is amazing.

    So I'll be carrying both these cameras because I want to document my adventure so that it can be shared with family and friends when I get back and for many years to come.

    Also, if you want truly great pictures, take your time and clean the animal up. I was exhausted after my sheep last year and just wasn't thinking about it. We were just above a creek and had all the water I needed, I just didn't think about it. Now I wish I had done more to clean it up, it would have made the pictures much nicer and a little more presentable.

    One other note... take lots of pictures! Different angles, positions, poses, etc. Use the flash, no flash, take a few shots that are zoomed in tight so it's just the head and the hunter. Pics that include too much background are sometimes weak.

    Out of 50-60 pictures, the hope is that you'll get a lot of good ones! But the reality is you may only get a handful that turn out great. So take lots!

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mossyhorn View Post
    I started packing a DSLR canon because the ability to get the best pictures........
    Years ago on my first couple sheep hunts I actually hauled my old full sized 35mm Pentax up the mountain. Did take some great pics, just not enough of them...
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    I've even sewed cut up lips with needle and thread to make the pictures nicer. I cotton hanky works great for cleaning up blood.

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    I'm 180 about pics of time hunting or animals taken. My Granddad had no pics but I can tell his stories with vigor and remember them like I was there. I am a if you want to see then come and see person.
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    I have to agree, but luckily I did take at least a couple of most my hunter's animals.....but not near enough. Believe it or not just didn't take enough on my own hunts.

    On another note.....I never thought you were that old of a guy to be able to say the above yet......unless you were maybe referring to your knee problems? I'm 57 and had knee surgery a few years ago, but I still plan on trying to at least be out there till the rest of me falls apart.......lol

    Nah 4mer I'm not so old... 40ish just beat up a bit from long trails and heavy packs. I just feel blessed every time I can get out there and get it done and I don't plan on stopping anytime soon...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    We usually take somewhere between 100-200 pictures per hunt - less if it's a day or weekend hunt, but we're still capturing a lot of images even on those ones. The importance of this was really driven home by something my grandfather passed along to my family when he passed away. He gave us his hunting journal (from Michigan) that starts back in the late 1920s. It's an amazing piece of history complete with pictures and lengthy descriptions of that year's hunt. I'd love to pass something similar along one day.
    Brian that sounds like a treasure indeed..A journal is another great one. I started one on my first guided hunt on the peninsula back in the early nineties and sadly gave up on it. I since lost it. My dad kept a journal of all his scuba diving adventures and I am sure I will get to read it someday with my son...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fullcurl View Post
    I've even sewed cut up lips with needle and thread to make the pictures nicer. I cotton hanky works great for cleaning up blood.
    Quality of pics was a huge one where I worked. We were taught to do everything possible to make the animal look lifelike and we used to take at least 50 pics at different angles to make sure. Nowadays with digital it seems a bit easier especially considering you can instantly see the pic.

    Dslr does not sound like a bad way to go. I've seen some pics on the pic section of the forum and I am just blown away....

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    Member mossyhorn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bear View Post
    Dslr does not sound like a bad way to go. I've seen some pics on the pic section of the forum and I am just blown away....

    Keep in mind too that a lot of people use photoshop with a lot of their landscape/scenery pics not to mention many of those hobby photographers are using lenses that cost a small fortune.

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    Member Alaskan22's Avatar
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    Lots and lots and then a few more pics!!! Can always delete, but can never get the animal put back together and back up on the mountain again. I save all of them, and have a hunt folder on the computer (and back up storage device). Every year I'll go and copy the photos from that year to a disk. I want to make sure I have plenty of copies of the photos, juuuuuust incase there is an accident. hate to lose memories.
    Know guns. Know peace. Know safety.

    No guns: no peace. No safety!

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    As my own taxidermist, I never mount my own animals because I don't have time, but I enjoy looking at photos of my hunts and they are my trophies.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    I'd add that folks should take a lot more pictures of the entire process, not just of the dead animal. Pictures of packing into the mountain, of ridgeline hikes, of eating lunch behind a rock while a storm blows through - it's all a sweet part of the memory and you'll never regret taking another minute to dig the camera out.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    I'd add that folks should take a lot more pictures of the entire process, not just of the dead animal. Pictures of packing into the mountain, of ridgeline hikes, of eating lunch behind a rock while a storm blows through - it's all a sweet part of the memory and you'll never regret taking another minute to dig the camera out.
    theres a few I could do with out that were posted here..lol the latest was Stid washing his feet...LOL

    But in all honesty Solid advice Brian.. I've already started this year and took a bunch already with my hunting partner on out scouting trip..

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bear View Post
    theres a few I could do with out that were posted here..lol the latest was Stid washing his feet...LOL
    Ah yes, but you recall the memory of how good that feels....!!!........lol
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Member Alaskan22's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    I'd add that folks should take a lot more pictures of the entire process, not just of the dead animal. Pictures of packing into the mountain, of ridgeline hikes, of eating lunch behind a rock while a storm blows through - it's all a sweet part of the memory and you'll never regret taking another minute to dig the camera out.
    I think most on this post will agree with this: to a LOT, the animal is the trophy. But to much more, the WHOLE EVENT is the trophy. I know I take lots of pics of every aspect. Keep the camera out on trips in and out. Some of my best "trophies" are on unsuccessful hunts, but unbelievable views and scenery!!
    Know guns. Know peace. Know safety.

    No guns: no peace. No safety!

  19. #19
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    I hauled my DSLR along on our float trip a few years ago and I took over 1500 pictures, the other three partners took about 1000 then we shared them all. On occasion I view them and wished I had taken even more.

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    In addition to taking some photos- anybody else ever take the time to write up the story?

    I find I enjoy writing it down as much as I enjoyed doing it and it leaves something for future generations to read. In the modern era, writing and publishing your stories and hunts has never been easier.

    The great hunters of yesterday may have only been so-so woodsmen in comparison to their peers but first rate storytellers never get forgotten.
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

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