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Thread: Small trailer tires

  1. #1
    Member ACNDHO's Avatar
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    Default Small trailer tires

    Where can I get 8x10 tires for a 2 place trailer BESIDES 6 robbers? Those tires don't last a year and they want to sell premounted wheels. I don't need rims every time I need a tire. Looking for good rubber that will last.
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  2. #2
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    When I had a trailer with the little tires I bought heavy duty tires from TDS off of International (they are behind Alaska Wildberry). They have been running strong for over 10 years now.

  3. #3

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    TrailerCraft in Anchorage sells tires only in that size as well.

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    Member Roger45's Avatar
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    Trailer Craft probably has one of the biggest local selections, otherwise go on-line. If your tires don't last a season, your first step should be to see if your axles are aligned, not the quality of the rubber IMHO. No tire will last if your axles are off by as little as 1/4 inch.
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    Member tccak71's Avatar
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    I've been having the same problem. The insides of both my tires completely wear out and get thin. As soon as I hit gravel they pop. I had to replace my axle (hubs and all the hardware too) at Lion's Head last year and got probably 3,000 miles out of both tires last summer and this past winter. I thought that my wheelers (polaris 6x6 and a polaris 500 4x4) weigh too much and that possibly my leaf springs weren't supporting the weight and my axle was flexing too much. Not sure if I should replace the leaf springs or just keep buying tires. As it is, I'm looking for a 4-place trailer right now and would rather not buy a new one at $6k.

    Roger 45, how do you check axle alignment?

    Tim

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    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tccak71 View Post

    Roger 45, how do you check axle alignment?

    Tim
    Measure from the tip of the ball coupler to the same point on each end of the axle. Obviously the measurements need to be the same. If the tires are only wearing on the inner edge I would say you are overloading the axle which bows under the weight causing more wear on the inside edge because of the camber of the tires.
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    What I do is mark the center point on the receiver. I then measure from center to the end of each spindle. If they are equal the trailer is alined. I do this when the trailer is under load. I also use a plum bob and see if there is a difference between top of the rim and the bottom to tell if the tire is toe in or out.

  8. #8
    Member Dupont Spinner's Avatar
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    Axle is flexing under load. Look to see if there is any type of strengthening gusset across the bottom of the axle. Many of the older smaller sled trailers were only made for about 1000 lbs. So a 6x6 and a 500 without gear is probably close to that max weight. I even have seen some lighter weight trailers...like in the 800 pound range, so look closely at the trailer before and after loading.

    Just double check your load weight versus trailer capacity. If you are more then 75% of trailer capacity with just dry weight of machines then it is time for an upgrade....IMHO.

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    Member tccak71's Avatar
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    I'm guessing that the GVWR for the trailer is 3,5000 lbs since it's a 3,500 lb axle. Both wheelers weigh 1,800 and the trailer weighs about 800, according to the registration. So... I'm at 75% of gross...

    I've looked at new trailers and they're only made with tandem 2200# axles, so I'll be near gross again on a new trailer with the 6x6 & 4x4 and both kid machines that weigh 575# and 325# (plus the trailer weighs around 1,200#). I'd like to find a trailer with tandem 3500# axles that literally doesn't weigh a ton.

    Heading out to fish the Klutina & Gulkana and ride Lake Louise & Eureka. When the tires show wear I'm just going to remove them and swap them to the other side of the trailer. That and I have 3 spares...

    Btw, back to the original post. In my experience, all the 20.5x8 tires suck. They're all made of nylon. I'd love to find a "real" tire for my trailer. I usually buy them a 6 Roblees and Trailercraft--on the rims. Don't know where to get 10" rims mounted.

    Tim

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by tccak71 View Post

    Btw, back to the original post. In my experience, all the 20.5x8 tires suck. They're all made of nylon. I'd love to find a "real" tire for my trailer. I usually buy them a 6 Roblees and Trailercraft--on the rims. Don't know where to get 10" rims mounted.

    Tim
    If you're in the Valley try Diversifief tire, had good luck with them in the past.

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by bmborum View Post
    If you're in the Valley try Diversifief tire, had good luck with them in the past.
    * Diversified

  12. #12
    Member Dupont Spinner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tccak71 View Post
    I'm guessing that the GVWR for the trailer is 3,5000 lbs since it's a 3,500 lb axle. Both wheelers weigh 1,800 and the trailer weighs about 800, according to the registration. So... I'm at 75% of gross...

    I've looked at new trailers and they're only made with tandem 2200# axles, so I'll be near gross again on a new trailer with the 6x6 & 4x4 and both kid machines that weigh 575# and 325# (plus the trailer weighs around 1,200#). I'd like to find a trailer with tandem 3500# axles that literally doesn't weigh a ton.

    Heading out to fish the Klutina & Gulkana and ride Lake Louise & Eureka. When the tires show wear I'm just going to remove them and swap them to the other side of the trailer. That and I have 3 spares...

    Btw, back to the original post. In my experience, all the 20.5x8 tires suck. They're all made of nylon. I'd love to find a "real" tire for my trailer. I usually buy them a 6 Roblees and Trailercraft--on the rims. Don't know where to get 10" rims mounted.

    Tim
    Yea...thats where the problem comes in. To get into the 3500 pound class axles you move into a significantly larger/heavier trailer. If you are towing with a pickup then you will notice little change moving to the larger trailer. Also consider the number of axles. A tandem axle setup would be better.

    As far as wearing tires on the inside, jack the trailer up and measure the top and bottom of the wheel flanges. If you find the measurements to be the same then take the measurement loaded. After a while many times a trailer axle will flex as they grow older.

    A couple of off topic side notes.....Check your lights, make sure they are working as designed, not making a left while your trailer is showing a right turn signal or better yet no signals at all, check your tires and air pressure, getting tired of dodging flying rubber and tire treads on the highway, check your load balance, if the trailer is swaying stop and fix it, if you can't stop the sway slow down, last thing is check and ensure your trailer is properly attached and level with your towing vehicle. Hunting season is right around the corner or as I like to call it is gas can season, ensure ALL of your load is secure. North Birchwood has a nice bump where I am sure I will get a few cans from this coming season.

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