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Thread: Holy Crap That's High!!

  1. #1
    Member BARTFRNCS's Avatar
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    Default Holy Crap That's High!!

    I was just looking through a PA-18-150 POH where I read service ceiling is 19K. Begs the ? how high have you flown in your cub?

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    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    I managed to get a PA-18 to 12,500ft once with a speed prop and an afternoon of playing the updrafts around mount McKinley. It took forever to get back down.
    Later I had a take-off prop on the same plane and it was hard pressed to go above 6 or 7 thousand feet in the summer and 8 thousand in the winter.
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    13,200 back of Knik Valley near Lake George, then slowly cool the engine for 15/20 minutes, then shut it off, and glide back to Birchwood.

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    13,500, but it was a flat-back agricultural model and that may have helped. Even with a Borer low-pitch float prop, it would cruise an honest 100-mph, most likely because of that missing longeron on the top.. Other Super Cub owners called me a liar about that cruise speed, but none of them could keep up with ol' N1858A.

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    Hey Float Pilot - - - wanna send your e-mail again? Didn't get it, for some reason. mm1235pm@att.net.

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    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    Griz: It looks like some folks have been beating up on old 1858A since you sold her years ago...
    Three accidents in the NTSB data bank...

    I too really like the Ag model PA-18s. I got to fly one for awhile that was an Ag model with a 135 horse 0-290D2 engine and no starter system...


    http://dms.ntsb.gov/aviation/Acciden...2013120000.pdf

    http://dms.ntsb.gov/aviation/Acciden...2013120000.pdf

    http://dms.ntsb.gov/aviation/Acciden...2013120000.pdf
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  7. #7

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    Don Sheldon was over the top of Denali Pass, maybe a little higher, looking for the missing Wilcox expedition...way high...
    14 Days to Alaska
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    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    Griz: It looks like some folks have been beating up on old 1858A since you sold her years ago...
    Three accidents in the NTSB data bank...

    I too really like the Ag model PA-18s. I got to fly one for awhile that was an Ag model with a 135 horse 0-290D2 engine and no starter system...


    http://dms.ntsb.gov/aviation/Acciden...2013120000.pdf

    http://dms.ntsb.gov/aviation/Acciden...2013120000.pdf

    http://dms.ntsb.gov/aviation/Acciden...2013120000.pdf
    Don't know why I'm unable to open any of those links. I do have the NTSB files in my PC, and will search there if you can give me the dates . . . . .

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    NTSB Identification: ANC11CA053
    14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
    Accident occurred Wednesday, June 15, 2011 in McCarthy, AK
    Probable Cause Approval Date: 10/04/2011
    Aircraft: PIPER PA-18A, registration: N1858A
    Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

    NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.
    The pilot of a tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that while back-taxiing at a remote, gravel-covered, off-airport site, a strong gust of wind lifted the tail, and the airplane nosed over. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing lift strut. The pilot stated that there were no mechanical anomalies with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

    The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:

    The pilot's failure to maintain control of the airplane while taxiing in gusty wind conditions.



    NTSB Identification: ANC06CA128.
    The docket is stored in the Docket Management System (DMS). Please contact Records Management Division
    Accident occurred Thursday, August 31, 2006 in Aniak, AK
    Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/31/2007
    Aircraft: Piper PA-18, registration: N1858A
    Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

    NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.
    The commercial certificated pilot reported that he was departing a remote airstrip toward the north on a Title 14, CFR Part 91, cross-country personal flight. The pilot said that the airplane lifted off to about 20 feet, and then encountered low level windshear that moved the airplane to the right, into high vegetation. The airplane received structural damage to the left wing lift strut and the right wing. The pilot indicated that the wind was from the north at 15 knots, with gusts to 30 knots.

    The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:

    The pilot's inadequate compensation for wind conditions during the takeoff initial climb, which resulted in a loss of control and in-flight collision with terrain. A factor contributing to the accident was a windshear.

    Full narrative available



    NTSB Identification: ANC02LA055.
    The docket is stored in the Docket Management System (DMS). Please contact Records Management Division
    Accident occurred Tuesday, June 18, 2002 in Anchorage, AK
    Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/16/2003
    Aircraft: Piper PA-18, registration: N1858A
    Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

    NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.
    The pilot of the accident airplane reported making a hard landing and bounced the airplane on the runway. He said he applied full power in an attempt to abort the landing, but the airplane bounced a second time, and exited the runway to the left where it encountered a ditch and nosed down. The left wing sustained substantial damage during the accident.

    The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:

    The pilot's improper recovery from a bounced landing, and his failure to maintain directional control of the airplane. A factor associated with the accident is a ditch adjacent to the runway.

    Full narrative available
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
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  10. #10
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Troy Hamon View Post
    Don Sheldon was over the top of Denali Pass, maybe a little higher, looking for the missing Wilcox expedition...way high...
    Sheldon landed his cub numerous times at 14,300 on a rescue. Geeting went into the same place with a 185. The Cub story is amazing because of the altitude, the 185 is equally amazing due to the shortness of the "runway".
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    Thanks, Float Pilot. N1959A was a fully instrumented IFR Super Cub, right down to the marker beacon, VOR head, and ADF. Still, it performed better than the treatment it apparently has suffered through. She had a metal belly, and a hinged top to allow top loading. Also had a smoke stack tube installed behind the head liner to store fishing rods without breaking them down. AND a helicopter cyclic grip with push-bottom transmitter ability. A great airplane that I hated to part with. Aerobatic harness front and back, and a rear stick cover. The landing light was a hot ATV light installed at the landing gear center connection point. Beat the hell out of wing-mounted landing lights, especially during nighttime snows or rain. Truly a custom Cub.

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