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Thread: Attaching net to hoop

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    Default Attaching net to hoop

    When replacing a net on a dipnet that has a hoop that has no break in it so that you can just slide on a new net, how do you attach the new net?

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    Quote Originally Posted by skydiver View Post
    When replacing a net on a dipnet that has a hoop that has no break in it so that you can just slide on a new net, how do you attach the new net?
    Does your dipnet have 2 screws by where the hoop meets the pole? If so, unscrew the 2 screws (they attach hoop to pole), pull the hoop out of the pole and your hoop will open up where the screws used to be (think horseshoe shaped). Then, simply slide the old net off the hoop and attach your new net.

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    Not set up that way. The hoop is a solid piece.

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    You can use white parachute chord and weave the chord through each outside net section and around the net frame. Pull it all tight and tie it off when you get to the end of the hoop. I cover the net and chord with a piece of garden hose that has been sliced open and I secure it to the hoop with zip ties. This protects the net from the wear and tear from the sand and rocks.

    Or you could just use electrical tape around the hoop and through the net like a lot of dippers do.

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    Good info. Does the net snag on the zip ties?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fuel E Fishin Sea View Post
    Does your dipnet have 2 screws by where the hoop meets the pole? If so, unscrew the 2 screws (they attach hoop to pole), pull the hoop out of the pole and your hoop will open up where the screws used to be (think horseshoe shaped). Then, simply slide the old net off the hoop and attach your new net.
    I see a lot of people using zip-ties to attach new net bags, but this always seems to lead to the nets getting tangled on the nubs, you can place these nubs as out of the way as possible and cover them with electrical tape and that will help somewhat, but it is best to figure out how the bag was put the hoop on in the first place. It is possible that even if your net hoop once did come loose from the pole, it is jammed up with silt and you could easily destroy the whole thing before you get them apart. In this case you could take some heavy nylon line such as mason's line, marlin line, net line, which you can by at most hardware stores, or Donalson's, and sew the line back on the net hoop. Some tie each section on the hoop, but use only one line doing it, some just run the line around the hoop, through a section of net, around the hoop and so forth and I don't know if it makes that much difference or not. I would suspect that tying each section would result with less friction, but not sure in the life of a net, if it would make that much difference as eventually the net is going to wear out anyway. If you are not an expert knot tier, you can put a drop of Super Glue on your knots and they will hold. This also works great for emergency repairs on the beach too. I am a klutz and can barely tie my shoes, so I have to use this method myself. If any of this is confusing, just look for the simplest explanation as I am a simple person.

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    Quote Originally Posted by skydiver View Post
    Good info. Does the net snag on the zip ties?
    Oh ya, it snags on the zip ties sooo soo bad, and the garden hose

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    1. Lay out your net and find a corner piece.
    2. Lay that corner edge of the net on the frame of the hoop. Make sure you start with the corner of the net.
    3. Take a piece of parachute cord and wrap it in a spiral pattern through the holes in the net and the frame of the hoop while leaving about a 6" bitter end loose.
    4. When you come back to to where you started, tie a loop using the 6" bitter end you left when you first started.
    5. Insert the bitter end you used to spiral wrap through the net and the frame of the hoop through that loop and pull tight.
    6. As you pull tight, spread the spiral loops that are around the net as much as you can and take up slack as you pull tight. This will prevent the line from going slack as the line shifts during use.
    7. Tie a overhand knot and cinch it up on the loop.
    8. Use the rest of the line to weave the bitter end through the netting to join the two ends of the net until net has formed a purse.
    9. Tie the end off with your favorite knot.

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    I use zip ties for quick repairs. I use the 2mm x4" zip ties and snip the bitter end flush. Never had them snag. For large tears, i'll use more parachute cord to stitch back together. I also carry a spare net just in case.

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    Regarding the garden hose, I also use that as it definitely saves wear and tear on the bottom of the net. I split the hose and between each segment of net use a wrap of GOOD QUALITY electrical tape, not zip ties. Using this method, I have had few if any snagging of the net to the hose. One other thing I would suggest, if you can find hose that matches the color of the water you are in as close as possible that is not a bad thing. You could also check out AIH or another large hardware / building supply and see if you can find some of the clear plastic tubing to use as covering for the bottom of your net. I don't really know if this would be that important, but the less obvious, the better I would think. You only need to put the hose in the area of the hoop that is going to contact the bottom of the surface you are fishing in.

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    Another option to garden hose is clear bilge hose from any marine store. I stopped using it becaxuse I'm a weakling and it caused to much drag.

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    Go to a commercial fishing supply store. Buy a mending needle and twine per their recommendation.
    Tying the net on is easy. Use a bunch of half hitches securing the net then wrap through each loop securing every so many loops I usually do every 3-4 loops.
    It is easy and the best way to secure your net to the hoop. This is similar to how commercial fishermen tie their nets.
    I keep a spare net, needle, and twine on the boat for emergency repairs. It is well worth the small investment for the needle and proper twine.
    Zip ties are for those guys who cannot tie a knot.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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    Quote Originally Posted by kasilofchrisn View Post
    Go to a commercial fishing supply store. Buy a mending needle and twine per their recommendation.Tying the net on is easy. Use a bunch of half hitches securing the net then wrap through each loop securing every so many loops I usually do every 3-4 loops.It is easy and the best way to secure your net to the hoop. This is similar to how commercial fishermen tie their nets.I keep a spare net, needle, and twine on the boat for emergency repairs. It is well worth the small investment for the needle and proper twine.Zip ties are for those guys who cannot tie a knot.

    Just because one entity does it one way does not make it superior to another method. The application, method and purpose dictates what is the best method. Use what method you feel is the most economical and makes sense. Thousands of individuals use their own methods with homemade nets and frames including PVC and they catch just as many fish as the person with a store bought net tied on using a mending needle with twine to attach a net with holes large enough to stick your hand through.

    While dipping, you have enough gear with you, why add more gear when you can keep it to a minimum? When out in the field, do use use a piece of duct tape because you have an emergency roll for all applications to fix a hole in your waders or do you bring out an iron and a portable generator with a heat activated patch? Be smart and keep it simple.

    As far as zip ties, I'm glad you pride yourself in knowing how to tie a half hitch but for those of us that want to get the most out of our investments after our travels and time, zip ties get the job done as fast as you can pull one out of your pocket and cinch it down. You don't catch fish when your net is out of the water.

    For the record, I have earned every single one of my swallows.



    Will

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    Quote Originally Posted by misanthrope View Post
    Just because one entity does it one way does not make it superior to another method. The application, method and purpose dictates what is the best method. Use what method you feel is the most economical and makes sense. Thousands of individuals use their own methods with homemade nets and frames including PVC and they catch just as many fish as the person with a store bought net tied on using a mending needle with twine to attach a net with holes large enough to stick your hand through.

    While dipping, you have enough gear with you, why add more gear when you can keep it to a minimum? When out in the field, do use use a piece of duct tape because you have an emergency roll for all applications to fix a hole in your waders or do you bring out an iron and a portable generator with a heat activated patch? Be smart and keep it simple.

    As far as zip ties, I'm glad you pride yourself in knowing how to tie a half hitch but for those of us that want to get the most out of our investments after our travels and time, zip ties get the job done as fast as you can pull one out of your pocket and cinch it down. You don't catch fish when your net is out of the water.


    Will
    I know some guys who are commercial fishermen. Some of them for over 40 years. While it is possible they showed me an inferior method of attaching a dipnet to a frame I highly doubt it.
    There is a reason they do things the way they do. Every one of the commercial boats and Setnetters on the Peninsula use the needle and twine method.
    None of them use zipties. But what do second and third generation commercial fishermen know about attaching nets?
    As far as space and gear it probably adds one or maybe two pounds which on the boat amounts to next to nothing. I stick it in the glove box of the boat and never know it is there until I need it. Size wise it takes up very little space.
    It took me just a few minutes to learn enough about net mending to attach a dipnet to a hoop. I don't do complicated net mending but attaching a new net to a hoop is really easy and I mean really easy.
    Also because my net is not getting tangled on ziptie nubs I catch more fish than the ziptie crowd. You catch less fish when your net is tangled or you are constantly untangling it.
    I Think I paid 12-15 dollars for my needle and twine and that's enough twine for several nets. Not bad when you figure it that way. Probably cheaper than zip ties if you have 3 or 4 nets to do.


    For the record, I have earned every single one of my swallows.
    OK I don't get this? What does it mean? Swallows?
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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    Quote Originally Posted by kasilofchrisn View Post
    I know some guys who are commercial fishermen. Some of them for over 40 years. While it is possible they showed me an inferior method of attaching a dipnet to a frame I highly doubt it.
    There is a reason they do things the way they do. Every one of the commercial boats and Setnetters on the Peninsula use the needle and twine method.
    None of them use zipties. But what do second and third generation commercial fishermen know about attaching nets?
    As far as space and gear it probably adds one or maybe two pounds which on the boat amounts to next to nothing. I stick it in the glove box of the boat and never know it is there until I need it. Size wise it takes up very little space.
    It took me just a few minutes to learn enough about net mending to attach a dipnet to a hoop. I don't do complicated net mending but attaching a new net to a hoop is really easy and I mean really easy.
    Also because my net is not getting tangled on ziptie nubs I catch more fish than the ziptie crowd. You catch less fish when your net is tangled or you are constantly untangling it.
    I Think I paid 12-15 dollars for my needle and twine and that's enough twine for several nets. Not bad when you figure it that way. Probably cheaper than zip ties if you have 3 or 4 nets to do.




    OK I don't get this? What does it mean? Swallows?

    I stated that, "application, method and purpose dictates what is the best method.", I never stated the method you learned was inferior. Your response is an excellent example of what I was saying.

    My net and thousands of others have never had a problem with it getting tangled on zipties that prevent us from catching any more fish than you, but if you have come across scientific data that proves your observation, I'd love to hear it.

    I paid $6 for 150 of parachute cord I can use to rig about 15 new nets and I need nothing more than my hands.

    My bag 100 count bag of zip ties cost me $3 and I can put my zip ties in my pocket and make repairs with one hand.

    If you do not understand the swallow reference, look at the last line in your post (#12). If you still don't get it, well, ask one of your 3rd generation commercial fisherman friends and maybe they can direct you.


    Skydiver was asking a question on mending nets. The best avenue of assisting an individual is to offer varying methods and allows them decide what their experience, availability of materials and comfort level to dictate how they wish to proceed. Stating that the 5,000 people in group A's method is inferior to the 5,000 people in group B based on nothin more than personal opinion followed by one last sling of mud is plain rude.

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    Quote Originally Posted by misanthrope View Post
    I stated that, "application, method and purpose dictates what is the best method.", I never stated the method you learned was inferior. Your response is an excellent example of what I was saying.

    My net and thousands of others have never had a problem with it getting tangled on zipties that prevent us from catching any more fish than you, but if you have come across scientific data that proves your observation, I'd love to hear it.

    I paid $6 for 150 of parachute cord I can use to rig about 15 new nets and I need nothing more than my hands.

    My bag 100 count bag of zip ties cost me $3 and I can put my zip ties in my pocket and make repairs with one hand.

    If you do not understand the swallow reference, look at the last line in your post (#12). If you still don't get it, well, ask one of your 3rd generation commercial fisherman friends and maybe they can direct you.


    Skydiver was asking a question on mending nets. The best avenue of assisting an individual is to offer varying methods and allows them decide what their experience, availability of materials and comfort level to dictate how they wish to proceed. Stating that the 5,000 people in group A's method is inferior to the 5,000 people in group B based on nothin more than personal opinion followed by one last sling of mud is plain rude.
    OK so I Googled the Swallows and now I know what that means (5,000 miles at sea in the Navy) though you have to admit it is confusing for those not in the know. I am still not sure it means you know how to tie on a new dipnet web.

    I am not trying to start an argument just stating some facts.
    Most if not all nets come from the manufacturer sewn on via similar methods that all commercial fishermen in Alaska use I have never seen a new net with zipties to hold the web on.
    It isn't that expensive or difficult to do.
    The end result is a better product then using zipties as evidenced by others posting about tangled nets on the zipties nubs.
    The OP can decide for himself but you have to admit the same way the manufacturers of dipnets and all Alaska commercial fishermen do it is most likely the best method and it certainly gives you the best results.
    I would even be happy to do it for the OP for free if he stopped by my house when I have time if he has the new web. It would take me less than ten minutes for most standard nets if the webbing is precut and sewn into a bag already which most web is nowadays.
    If you use zipties and have to untangle your net after every fish then my net spends more time in the water hence more fish and less headaches.
    Those wanting to attach new dipnet web I just want you to know that sewing on web is neither expensive nor is it difficult to do with needle and twine. No mud slinging intended.
    Just my $.02
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skydiver View Post
    When replacing a net on a dipnet that has a hoop that has no break in it so that you can just slide on a new net, how do you attach the new net?
    If you are going to be around the Kenai south beach tomorrow I would be happy to sew some new web on your net I'll be there surfcast fishing..
    If you don't have the web I probably have a spare I could sell you for what I paid for it.~$28
    Send me a PM if you are interested so I can bring my needle and twine.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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    Quote Originally Posted by kasilofchrisn View Post
    If you are going to be around the Kenai south beach tomorrow I would be happy to sew some new web on your net I'll be there surfcast fishing..
    If you don't have the web I probably have a spare I could sell you for what I paid for it.~$28
    Send me a PM if you are interested so I can bring my needle and twine.
    I appreciate the offer, but unfortunately I had back surgery two days ago and am SOL for the rest of the season. Fortunately, I was able to get my limit on the Kasilof two days before my surgery

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    Here's my 3 cents worth...I use zip ties, because I haven't found any thing better for sweeping in chitina my net is always scraping bottom.zip ties aretough lite an strong.because the netdoes hang up on them I may put some time in this winter coming up with some different ideas.if you are a sweeper an have any ideas id love to hear em

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