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Thread: Best wood stoves

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    Member akriverunner's Avatar
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    Default Best wood stoves

    I'm wondering what everyone is using for woodstoves and the sq ft you are heating with it. I'm needing one but I don't want to spend 3k plus on a blaze king that I have to replace catalytic converters in. Does anyone have info about englander, drolet or osburn? I will be heating 24x36 with 12' walls 8/12 pitch roof and half loft.

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by akriverunner View Post
    I'm wondering what everyone is using for woodstoves and the sq ft you are heating with it. I'm needing one but I don't want to spend 3k plus on a blaze king that I have to replace catalytic converters in. Does anyone have info about englander, drolet or osburn? I will be heating 24x36 with 12' walls 8/12 pitch roof and half loft.
    Blaze King makes a great stove. That being said, I'm not a fan of catalytic stoves. Not a direct answer to your question, but I like the Sherwood Industries Enviro stoves. They're an extremely well engineered, extremely efficient, non-catalytic stoves. Here's a good, if not all inclusive, reference for comparing efficiencies: http://www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/air/i...ood_stoves.pdf
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    Default Blaze king Queen

    Keep you eye out for a $600-$800 non cat blaze king queen in decent shape. I have a 1983 model that I would not sell for $2000... love that stove and she purs like a kitten.... don't wast your time on anything else like I did before getting the BK Queen. This stove is the F-150 of wood stoves.

    Just my two cents... but the truth.

    Tom


    Quote Originally Posted by akriverunner View Post
    I'm wondering what everyone is using for woodstoves and the sq ft you are heating with it. I'm needing one but I don't want to spend 3k plus on a blaze king that I have to replace catalytic converters in. Does anyone have info about englander, drolet or osburn? I will be heating 24x36 with 12' walls 8/12 pitch roof and half loft.

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    Member akriverunner's Avatar
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    theres a princess on CL but I'm needing something a little bigger then that

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    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by akriverunner View Post
    theres a princess on CL but I'm needing something a little bigger then that
    Get a barrel and a Vogelzang kit and some firebrick and high heat paint and make one .....don't overthink it....the best stove is basically a rather large firebox with a super tight door and a chimney going straight up through the roof....no baffles, no cat, no T's, no damper, no fan, or other bells and whistles....sure, you won't be able to squeeze every last BTU out of that chunk of 2x4, so make sure you've got plenty of wood, make sure it's dry dry dry, and when the barrel burns out, go buy another for $20!
    " Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

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    Member alaska4ever's Avatar
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    I bought a Drolet Compak last year at Moores hardware Talkeetna Spur and installed it in my 12x16town cabin, it was to big and burned me out and it wasn't very tight. Traded it for a dog sled. The BQ is your best bet.
    JOHN

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    Big areas take lots of BTUs to heat initially. You'll want big output with good low output control, too. You might think about more than one stove if you're a weekender. Or a big wood stove and an efficient oil stove. That's a great combo. Heat it fast, even heat once it's up to temp.

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    We've had a Blaze King in a place. GREAT stove. We now have an old EarthStove. Big box- great stove- but we plan to install a regular old school damper in the pipe I think.

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    I'll second the barrel stove with the Vogelzang kit with firebrick. I've been using that to heat a 1500 sq ft cabin for five years and it's been fantastic. Make sure you use one of the thick barrels. The ones I have were used for the foam insulation and seem to be about twice as heavy as the ones used for other uses.

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    I love my Vermont Castings stove. I heat 30 x 30 with half loft above. Never have I had to cut and use kindling. Put 2 or 3 round Logs in it w a couple pieces of newspaper, lite it up with bottom vent open. Come back 5 minutes later and seal her up. I think Vermont got bought out by someone and now they share names.
    The place just off new Seward hiway on dowling rd (east) a block or so has em. Great place to do business with but name eludes me. Had another brand of stove in another home which I grew to hate. I been around a fair number of stoves and there are some good ones mentioned on this thread, but I love the ease of starting and would hate to give that feature up.
    Your sarcasm is way, waaaayyyyyyyy more sarcastic than mine!

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    Member akriverunner's Avatar
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    i do not want a barrel stove, I am looking for something nice that isn't $3000. I want something with a large fire box that i dont have to get up and feed at night, i will also have a toyo in the cabin as back up or let run while we are gone.

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    Member KelvinG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by akriverunner View Post
    i do not want a barrel stove, I am looking for something nice that isn't $3000. I want something with a large fire box that i dont have to get up and feed at night, i will also have a toyo in the cabin as back up or let run while we are gone.
    If you see one you like grab it fast.

    I looked for a nice wood stove for my place what I found was what I thought was a fair price for a used stove didn't get me near the quality I wanted. And the stoves that were the quality I wanted were dang near the price of new.

    I finally gave up and shelled out the cash for a new high end blaze king. Im really happy with it and Im burning a lot less wood than I thought Id burn.

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    We heat a 1000 sq. ft cabin with R-19 in the ceiling on the 2nd floor using a Blaze King Princess. Currently it has vapor barrier over insulation as we have not hung the sheeting yet. With the stove on low it is perfect upstairs all winter long, any more insulation and we would be too hot. This was done on purpose to keep it from being too hot as others have mentioned. No need to waste $ on over-insulating when all you do is open the windows in the middle of winter anyway when it's too warm.
    The stove heats it up quickly and will burn over 24 hours between restocking's. We used it (the princess) in our home till we bought a Blaze King, King model 2 years ago. We have no reason to replace the cat in it as it still burns great. Wouldn't trade either one.
    The King was needed at the house so I didn't have to split as much wood as it accepts larger rounds.
    The King model was about $2200- new, using the Obama energy rebate and a sale at Ak Fireplace out on mile 49 on the parks hwy. The Princess was about the same price over 10 years ago.
    BK

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    I never cared for the way Blaze King's look. I prefer cast iron stoves with a little decoration. It looks like Blaze wants some of that market. They're coming out with a good looking model they named the Ashford. Funny how it looks pretty similar to a Waterford Ashling and a couple of other popular European stoves. There are lots of good heaters out there. The trick is finding one that pleases the eye, too. To the original question, I've heard good things about Drolet and Osburn but I've never used either. Jotul and Waterford are great stoves. That from experience. More than one friend has the Vermont Castings stove that top loads. They rave about them. Several friends use Blaze models w/no complaints. Lots of choices. Good luck with the search.

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bkmail View Post
    ...This was done on purpose to keep it from being too hot as others have mentioned. No need to waste $ on over-insulating when all you do is open the windows in the middle of winter anyway when it's too warm...
    Never heard of intentionally under-insulating to accommodate a larger stove...

    I like to insulate to at least R-40, and apply less heat (smaller stove; more efficient burns; less frequent fires; etc.), but maybe that's just me.
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    Not intentionally under-insulating, but insulating to suit the purpose. I understand it perfectly. Even with R19 in the ceiling and lots of windows I have to run my small oil stove quite low once the cabin is warmed up or it'll cook us out. I can't get a smaller oil stove that I like and I can't run it lower so what purpose would more insulation serve? Yet when we first arrive and it's -25* I want my big wood stove to push BTUs into the cabin faster than it can. This isn't an internet theory or an imagined position, it's reality. And the reality of all my friends who have weekend cabins. If your situation is different? Good for you. One size doesn't fit all.

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    Not intentionally under-insulating, but insulating to suit the purpose. I understand it perfectly. Even with R19 in the ceiling and lots of windows I have to run my small oil stove quite low once the cabin is warmed up or it'll cook us out. I can't get a smaller oil stove that I like and I can't run it lower so what purpose would more insulation serve? Yet when we first arrive and it's -25* I want my big wood stove to push BTUs into the cabin faster than it can. This isn't an internet theory or an imagined position, it's reality. And the reality of all my friends who have weekend cabins. If your situation is different? Good for you. One size doesn't fit all.
    Yup, heating up a large thermal mass from -45 is a drag, no matter what size stove you have. I must have missed the part where you said you were referring to the context of a weekend only cabin, sorry. I guess in the case of a cabin you're only going to use occasionally for short periods, you could make a case for not putting much money into insulation... I assume the OP was referring to a permanently occupied dwelling. Perhaps that's not the case.
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
    I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief. ~Gerry Spence
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    You guys in the cold country have different problems. If it drops below -25 I'm not riding to the cabin. The occasional nights it drops into the -40s aren't comfortable. I can keep the cabin cozy at -25 but wake up to -45? Everything's burning to keep the space comfortable. If I had to maintain 70* every day in your climate I'd want more insulation, too. If I never see -40* again I won't miss it. That number gets softer every year, too.

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    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    Taiga,
    Correct, its a cabin. As Pid mentioned, no need to dump money into insulation that is not needed.
    At my house it's a different story, but at the cabin it's plenty warm with R-19 in the roof.
    BK

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    ImageUploadedByTapatalk1374116955.803040.jpg

    Here's the Vermont casting stove I have. Front loads or side loads which is nice.
    I too have toyo 56 in the garage below the house. It keeps the home warm enough if we are gone for a few days. When home we just keep the toyo set low.
    Your sarcasm is way, waaaayyyyyyyy more sarcastic than mine!

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