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Thread: 300 grain Bear Claws

  1. #1

    Default 300 grain Bear Claws

    Has anyone had any actual in the field experience with these from one of the 375s...either handloaded or Fed Premium?

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    Member SLA's Avatar
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    That's what I used on kodiak last fall for my bear hunt. Bought and used them for sighting in, used the federal cape shok got them from cabelas.
    no problems here. Weatherby 375 h&h
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  3. #3

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    No firsthand experience, but the Bear Claws and the A-Frames are personal choices of a couple of bear guides I know, though interesting enough several others prefer the Remington Corelokt. Lot of bear guides, especially the younger ones, are slowly switching to one or another of the 416's.

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    I've been handloading for the past fifteen years or so, but the last factory loads I used in the field were Federal's with 300grn Trophy Bonded Bearclaws (375H&H). The two in the photo (kind of blurry...sorry) were recovered from a bull moose I shot at around 100 yards. The first shot was directly broadside...the bull went down and thrashed around for ten seconds or so and then got up and started walking away. The second was a raking shot as it was going away from me. Both bullets were found laying in the chest cavity when I opened him up. Neither had penetrated the far side at all. You can see that both had expanded maximally. I've not weighed them, but I'm guessing they didn't lose too much. The bullets worked and got the job done, but my preference would have been a bit less expansion and greater penetration. I personally like bullets to expand, hold together and pass through for an exit wound. I've taken many bull moose since then, handloading 270grn X's and TSX's...all the bulls went down, stayed down, and I've never recovered a bullet.
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    I've used them in Federal ammo with great results both on multiple moose and grizzly. But I think any of the great premium bullets of today will probably give similar results. I would shoot more TBBCs if Fed sold bullets only.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by VernAK View Post
    ...I think any of the great premium bullets of today will probably give similar results.
    Wise man. They aren't inventing tougher critters near as fast as they're inventing new bullets. Lots of good bullets have been working for a long time, and most of the justification for the newest and "best" is some manufacturer's scheme for new sales. Sure the new work, but so do the old.

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    Choice is a good thing...black powder worked, still works, and some people continue to prefer it (for various reasons). It's not my choice, but if black powder was all we had, I'd go with it...and I'd shoot lead cast bullets if that was all we ever had. I'm sure I'd be a happy hunter.

    Maybe we have too many premium bullet choices, and I for one agree that some (certainly not all) of the options don't significantly vary from one another except in marketing presentation, but I'll take that scenario over limited choice. With so many options (when in stock) we each get to make an informed decision and choose our favorite flavor for our own reasons...which I think is the intent/purpose of the original poster.

  8. #8

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    Doc:

    Spot on.I wasn't in any way implying that TBBCs were the only choice.Any of us knows that there are many top notch choices today in either the HL or factory persusions.

    But we also know that marketing hype can't substitute for real honest to God in the field experience.Anymore than the "one hunt" reviews we all read are in any way valid data points.

    Other than big bears and perhaps moose, there is no need for 300gr Bearclaws in Alaska...or anywhere in the North American continent.But like a Warne winch, when you need help in a big way."something else" may not suffice.

    At the end of the day, if all we had were Nosler PTs, we would probably never know the difference.

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    I like your winch metaphor...very true indeed. It's great having bullet choices...and to each their own on that one.

    BTW, I've used those 270TSX's to take three interior grizzlies (one mine and two others as a back-up for my friends). One of my fiends that I was backing-up was using 250grn Corelokts out of a 338WM...he put a great shot on a nice boar which started to run when hit... I immediately shot right after him (as we had preplanned)...my shot tumbled the boar, but he got up and ran 15 yards or so into an alder thicket...he piled-up real fast within 10 yards...to be honest, when we examined him it was clear that he would have been dead from the Corelokt alone.

    That said, many years ago I once shot a coastal brown bear with that same caliber/bullet (338WM/250 Corelokt). Hit it right in the middle of the chest at 35-40 yards as it was running directly towards me. The bullet penetrated an inch or so, hit bone, and exploded like a hand-grenade creating a cavity the size of my fist. The impact knocked the bear completely backwards...and then it got up and started to run away. Two more shots and it was down.

    Choices are good...

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    doc, if you get a chance, try a woodleigh if over-expansion aint your cup of tea. I really wish that I, AKheloce, or the yukon river guy could show you a bullet recovered from big bull moose.....but they keep sailing, keep busting through hide n bone....then found somewhere in china under someone's bamboo mat.

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    Are you talking about the solids, Mainer?

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    no, the various weldcores either in protected point, or the round nosed versions.

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    OK...thank you, sir.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doc View Post
    I've been handloading for the past fifteen years or so, but the last factory loads I used in the field were Federal's with 300grn Trophy Bonded Bearclaws (375H&H). The two in the photo (kind of blurry...sorry) were recovered from a bull moose I shot at around 100 yards. The first shot was directly broadside...the bull went down and thrashed around for ten seconds or so and then got up and started walking away. The second was a raking shot as it was going away from me. Both bullets were found laying in the chest cavity when I opened him up. Neither had penetrated the far side at all. You can see that both had expanded maximally. I've not weighed them, but I'm guessing they didn't lose too much. The bullets worked and got the job done, but my preference would have been a bit less expansion and greater penetration. I personally like bullets to expand, hold together and pass through for an exit wound. I've taken many bull moose since then, handloading 270grn X's and TSX's...all the bulls went down, stayed down, and I've never recovered a bullet.
    Doc, that just blows my mind that those bullets didn't exit. Maybe they score the inside nose of the jacket a bit too much, and combine that with the high velocity of your handloads, maybe they expanded right wide open from the very beginning? That initial shock of such rapid expansion seems evident in the reaction of the bull moose. For a moose to "drop" like that instantly......that's some devastating stuff. Being as tough as they are, it's no wonder he got up, due to lack of penetration. Darn bull absorbed over 4000 ft lbs of energy....the shrugged it off. These animals amaze me, tough is an understatement.

    might have been a different story if that was a 375 hawk/scovill. 175 grain woodleigh protected points out penetrate the 7 mm rem mag, when shot from a 7x57 mauser. Same bullet, but 250 fps difference.........

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    Quote Originally Posted by mainer_in_ak View Post
    Doc, that just blows my mind that those bullets didn't exit. Maybe they score the inside nose of the jacket a bit too much, and combine that with the high velocity of your handloads, maybe they expanded right wide open from the very beginning? That initial shock of such rapid expansion seems evident in the reaction of the bull moose. For a moose to "drop" like that instantly......that's some devastating stuff. Being as tough as they are, it's no wonder he got up, due to lack of penetration. Darn bull absorbed over 4000 ft lbs of energy....the shrugged it off. These animals amaze me, tough is an understatement.

    might have been a different story if that was a 375 hawk/scovill. 175 grain woodleigh protected points out penetrate the 7 mm rem mag, when shot from a 7x57 mauser. Same bullet, but 250 fps difference.........
    Just to clarify Mainer...those 300gr TBBC's that I pictured and described were Federal Premium (factory) loads.

    I was surprised as well...tough is definately an understatement (you said that well, sir).

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