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Thread: Putting in at anchorage cook inlet.

  1. #1
    Member sgtpunisher's Avatar
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    Default Putting in at anchorage cook inlet.

    has anyone put in there boat at anchorage port next to ship creek,. i see there is a boat ramp. is the water too shallow? is the fishing any good in cook inlet? can someone tell me any expericanes in cook inlet? i have a 17.5 fot starcraft with a 75 hp outboard.

  2. #2
    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    You can troll for kings at the mouth of Ship Creek or run up Knik Arm to the mouth of Eagle River or Eklutna River.

    BE CAREFUL!!! The chop comes up in Cook Inlet awful fast. It can go from flat calm to dangerous in a snap. Mornings are usually calm and the afternoons usually windy. Also you have to watch the tides--it's easy to get stuck out there.

  3. #3
    Member Cliffhanger's Avatar
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    Default Beware Tides

    I tried trolling off Ship Creek last spring and didn't have any luck. I think the water is just too murky, something a biologist friend over at Fish & Game agrees with.


    If the tide change is big you can run out of ramp and have to wait for the tide to come in so you can get your boat back on the trailer, and vice versa.

  4. #4
    Member Rod in Wasilla's Avatar
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    I also tried trolling at the mouth of Ship once. Didn't catch anything, but the view of Anchorage was great.
    Quote Originally Posted by northwestalska
    ... you canít tell stories about the adventures you wished you had done!

  5. #5
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    Default Watch the tide

    Hate to admit this, but I'd hate to see anyone do anything studip like I did.... I got stuck there last year after fishing for silvers in the mouth of ship creek. Didn't realize that the ramp was inaccesable at low tides. To top that off, I had the brainiak idea to try to motor up to the knik (which I do not recommend)... Long story short, I sent the wife with the tuck and trailer to meet me up there. Ended up spending the day out in the middle of the knik arm high and dry. I made it about 2 miles short of birchwood. It was unbelieveable how fast the water went out of the arm and the next thing I knew all I could see was mud all around me. Raised the motor and waited for the tide to come in and then motored back to Anchorage. I probably waited 5 hours or so? My wife was not too happy........ That was the weekend before I got my cell phone (obviously, that incident had a lot to do with convincing me to get one).

  6. #6
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    Default would not do it

    I would not go out into the inlet at Anchorage in a 17.5 foot boat - period. The tides, wind, boat traffic, turbidity of the water, and other factors all make this so dangerous that it is not worth it. Take your boat to Homer or Seward or in the Susitna and enjoy areas where fish are abundant and the risk is acceptable.

  7. #7

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    so, launching out of ship creek and heading to 16b would'nt be feasable?

  8. #8
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    francko,

    You're not the first and won't be the last member of the Knik Arm chapter of the high and dry club.

    Regardless of the size of the boat and moter, the speed of the tide in the arm can be very deceptive. I've been part of "rescuing" of a few boaters in distress on the arm and it is amazing how far a disabled boat can drift with the tide. One zodiac ran out of fuel just 100 yards from the mouth of the small boar harbor. We got the dispatch at 6:00 am and were in the water by 6:45. It took the department's 24' Naiad with twin 200 hp outboards at least 20 minutes to catch up with the unlucky fishermen well west of Fire Island. By the time we had them in tow, we were 17 miles from the small boat harbor. You can do the math; 17 miles in 65 minutes.

    Not every launch for a disabled boat is as quick as ours was. We had help from the rest of the guys in the station to hook the boat up and traffic through town was light.

    So that you know the current steps of calling for help in the Knik Arm:

    1. 911 call to Anchorage Police or Fire Dispatch
    2. AFD sends the call to Alaska State Troopers because they have jurisdiction for statewide search and rescue
    3. AST contacts the 210th Air National Guard for their availability. The 210th will be concerned about their prop wash overturning any boat and may not launch their Pavehawk.
    4. AST should contact the inlet tug companies for their availability
    5. AST will ask AFD to launch our Naiad if the tugs are not available
    6. USCG will only be involved if their primary mission of Homeland Security of the port will not be compromised. Since they have limited vessels and personnel, their availability is limited.

    The moral of the story, always have a float plan, call early if you think you have a problem, keep the cell phone charged up, have plenty of fuel, water and food for the time you may be delayed in returning to the dock.

    Dobber

    ps I have launched my own 18' skiff at the small boat harbor and trolled outside the mouth of Ship Creek for Silvers but without success. Water was a little choppy and that may have been a factor.
    Last edited by jsdobson; 05-18-2007 at 23:36. Reason: spelling errors

  9. #9

    Default Launched

    Launched a few times out of Anchorage, sure do got to watch the tide. Commercial skifs go straight across all the time. Never had a problem, never had motor break down, would be same problem in Homer. Been to the Little & Big Sue, did well off Ship Creek, just over the ledge, hint! Did a trip to Kenai once. Better know how to navigate by the charts. Some how the big container ships come in!

  10. #10

    Default Sunday

    Im going to try for Alexander creek in the morning. Gonna leave a couple of hours before high tide; for a few reasons 1. boat launch 2. more water on the other side. 3. slack tide 4. when the tide is going out and the wind is comming up the inlet it can get some chop on top of the normal tidal rollers. Ill have more info in a week.

  11. #11

    Default we made it

    We made it over and back. The boat launch was not to bad ; we used it at high tide.
    On the way over the inlet was smooth as far as waves but there are alot of differant currents out there.
    On the way back there was about a 1 foot chop from the wind the tide was coming in so i think once the tide turned it would stack up real nice.
    It seems that the wind picks up in the afternoon so the earlier you can get accross the better.

  12. #12
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JMH View Post
    so, launching out of ship creek and heading to 16b would'nt be feasable?
    Why not launch at deshka landing and cross the river instead?
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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