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Thread: Deer Transplant

  1. #1
    Member Cliffhanger's Avatar
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    Default Deer Transplant

    I would like members of this forum to weigh in on the question:

    WOULD YOU SUPPORT THE TRANSPLANT OF DEER TO THE SOUTH SIDE OF KACHEMAK BAY (Seldovia area)? And please describe your reasons for or against.

    Thanks.

    jim

  2. #2

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    I would like deer all over the KPB

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Yeah, transplant them for KP residents only!
    (ha ha, ducking now).

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    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    I've been saying that for years, but I'm not sure if the deer would edge out the few moose there by competition for habitat....do deer and moose coexist?
    " Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cdubbin View Post
    I've been saying that for years, but I'm not sure if the deer would edge out the few moose there by competition for habitat....do deer and moose coexist?
    In Canada they do. Around Wrangell, Berners Bay, Yakutat...
    I would think deer might do well in the Seward area. Maybe even around Hope. They've been seen on the KP (supposedly), but then so has bigfoot and cougar

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    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    Alright! I got a rope, who's got a boat?
    " Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cdubbin View Post
    Alright! I got a rope, who's got a boat?
    Hey Dave, can we borrow your landing craft and head out toward Kodiak?

  8. #8

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    Neither here nor there on it cuzz I don't live there, but you have to ask yourself about winter range for them. I don't see any barriers to them migrating up into that area about a bazzillion years ago, but none did. Must be a reason. If I was putting together a stocking plan, I'd set up something like hatchery trucks for annual trout planting. Just drive through the area each spring pushing deer out the door, but figure on doing it again the next year to replace the ones that starved and died over the winter. With enough money almost anything is possible. Heck yeah, just add it to the state budget.

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    Neither here nor there on it cuzz I don't live there, but you have to ask yourself about winter range for them. I don't see any barriers to them migrating up into that area about a bazzillion years ago, but none did. Must be a reason. If I was putting together a stocking plan, I'd set up something like hatchery trucks for annual trout planting. Just drive through the area each spring pushing deer out the door, but figure on doing it again the next year to replace the ones that starved and died over the winter. With enough money almost anything is possible. Heck yeah, just add it to the state budget.
    They weren't native to PWS or Kodiak/Afognak either, but they're doing OK. Shoulda migrated to PWS by bazzillion year formula.
    Moose were transplanted to Cordova area. Doing OK there, but should have been natural, so same kind of thing.
    Yeah, I'm pretty sure the state wouldn't do this, and I'd be dead by the time they were harvestable but my kids and grand kids wouldn't be.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    They weren't native to PWS or Kodiak/Afognak either, but they're doing OK.
    Best I can tell, the transplants to Kodiak (they migrated on their own to Afognak) weren't paid for by the government. Sportmen's groups ponied up for it. I'm sure if hunters would foot the bill today, deer transplants would have more starch.

  11. #11

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    Us "White people" are not native to the Kenai Peninsula..........but wow are we thriving and destroying the natural environment.

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    Member bushrat's Avatar
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    Isn't such a notion moot, Jim? I mean, I don't think such a transplant would be allowed at this point in time. Or anywhere in the forseable future.

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    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bushrat View Post
    Isn't such a notion moot, Jim? I mean, I don't think such a transplant would be allowed at this point in time. Or anywhere in the forseable future.
    Mark,

    I'm not so sure that ADF&G would oppose transplants in general. I can't speak to this one in particular, but I recently heard that the Department may be looking into Dall sheep transplants in some areas currently not populated with sheep. At this point is appears to be only a preliminary look at where stocking might be possible, with no assurances that it will happen. The point is that it appears such possibilities could exist.

    Are you aware of any restrictions that would keep such things from happening? I mean, besides the complex biological and environmental issues?

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    Best I can tell, the transplants to Kodiak (they migrated on their own to Afognak) weren't paid for by the government. Sportmen's groups ponied up for it. I'm sure if hunters would foot the bill today, deer transplants would have more starch.
    True, but I was addressing your natural migration over "bazzillion years" statement, not who did it, or where the funds would come from. However, the state has done a LOT of wildlife planting over the years. Kalgin Island is another one.

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    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
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    Is there any Brucellocis in any of the alaska deer populations?

    That would be a deal killer, IMO, if there was a possiblity of transmitting that, or brainworm or some other malady to the native moose pops...

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by bushrat View Post
    Isn't such a notion moot, Jim? I mean, I don't think such a transplant would be allowed at this point in time. Or anywhere in the forseable future.

    Yes. Let's thank our lucky stars (because we can't thank any dieties here) that government was so primitive a century ago, or there would be no deer within a thousand miles of here if sportsmen hadn't transplanted deer before the "Progressive Age" got control of everything.

  17. #17
    Member bushrat's Avatar
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    Mike,

    I probably should have said that I don't think such a transplant would ever be approved, rather than allowed. The possibility of any transplants are always there, according to ADFG's transplant policy, which is fairly strict and involves a number of hurdles, including a public review process.

    I would assume that that primary goal of a deer transplant program to the other side of K-bay would be "to establish a huntable population of deer." So going from there, a number of studies would have to be done before ADFG could even recommend it, then a public review process, then funding acquired for the capture and transplant of deer, likely confinement and disease testing, followup research, more funding etc.

    I just don't see the possibility of it ever being seriously studied, let alone recommended in the first place, based on what we already know. We know how certain snow depths relate to deer mortality, and how if they are cumulative over years what they can do to decimate a deer population. Right off the bat we can look at the average snow depth on that side of K-bay, over by Seldovia, and say it will be one for-sure major deer-killing winter after another, with no let up at all.

    As far as any sheep transplants, interesting that there may be talk on that within the Department. The possibilities are always there for any transplants to take place, according to the Dept's transplant policy. Off hand though, I can't think of a mtn range that doesn't have dall sheep from south central on north.

  18. #18
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    I suspect that sheep could be moved to repopulate some areas where they have been eliminated. The challenge there is expecting the animals to figure out where the summer and winter ranges are. I am quite positive that there are a number of specific drainages where sheep once existed and likely could be reintroduced successfully.

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    It's my understanding that deer survive brain worm whereas moose don't survive it. MN recently lost a lot of moose and some of it was attributed to this.

    A mule deer wanders in from Yukon Territory once in a while but not viable breeding populations. I've seen two.

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    Member Mkay's Avatar
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    A few years ago someone transplanted some turkeys and guineas to Girdwood.
    My child was inmate of the month at Mat-Su pre-trial Correctional facility.

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