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Thread: At what point do we close the beaches??

  1. #1
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Default At what point do we close the beaches??

    So according to this article there is an outbreak of Fecal Coliform and Enterococci on the Kenai beach.
    http://www.ktuu.com/news/spike-in-ke...,1646261.story

    At what point do we close the contaminated beaches to the public when we have an outbreak like this?
    I know the dipnet season is about to start on these beaches.
    Is it safe to let people fish,camp,clean fish etc. on a contaminated beach?
    If there is enough bacteria on these beaches to make posting warning signs a good idea should we allow people to clean fish there?
    I know in times past they posted warnings in the newspapers during dipnet season when we had bacterial outbreaks this year it sounds like signs will be posted at beach access points.
    This year it appears we know before the season starts that the area is infected. It would certainly be easier to close them now and not wait until dipping is in full swing and it becomes hard to get people to leave if the bacteria levels get a lot worse.
    I would venture the bacteria will get worse as the masses descend on the beach for the dipnet season as in years past the bacteria showed up after the season was in full swing.
    So the question I pose is at what point do we close the beaches when we have a situation like this? Or do we allow the public to use them at their own rish and roll the dice that nobody gets bacterial poisioning or other issues from it?
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

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    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    Any waterway will have bacteria of some kind; can't close 'em all. I doubt the state/borough/city/whomever has the time, resources, inclination, etc. to enforce such a ban....the city should at least post signs to keep their butts covered, but let the nanny syndrome stop there.
    " Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by kasilofchrisn View Post
    ......So the question I pose is at what point do we close the beaches when we have a situation like this? Or do we allow the public to use them at their own rish and roll the dice that nobody gets bacterial poisioning or other issues from it?
    I have a question for you:

    Are you a commercial fisherman?

    If the water is contaminated, should we close all fishing, including commercial?

    Like this:

    http://www.seattlepi.com/news/scienc...nd-4651197.php

  4. #4
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brain View Post
    I have a question for you:

    Are you a commercial fisherman?

    If the water is contaminated, should we close all fishing, including commercial?

    Like this:

    http://www.seattlepi.com/news/scienc...nd-4651197.php
    No I am not a commercial fisherman.
    Commercial fish would likely not be affected by this because those fish are caught in areas miles away and not near the bacterial affected beaches and those fish have not passed the affected beaches before being caught.
    If the water is contaminated then yes commercial fishing should be shut down. Just like it was during the Exxon Valdez spill.
    Ok if we don't close the beach what about allowing people to clean their fish on the beach?
    The article states we should not swim in or drink the water. So we should allow people to wade in it all day and rinse their fish in it?
    I don't want a nanny state either but how many people bring their kids down to the beach while they dipnet and let the kids play in the Bacteria infested...aaah...err.....I mean on the beach in the sand and water. The kids don't have much choice and/or probably don't know any better.
    Anyway The signs are a good Idea I just worry that may not be enough as most probably will ignore them anyway. Just like a private property sign it might as well be a come in were open neon sign to some people.
    Then again I refuse to dipnet from that beach anyway. Way too crowded and trashed for my taste.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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    Any chance this will clear up in the next week or two?

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by medic2022 View Post
    Any chance this will clear up in the next week or two?
    Not likely as the seagull crap that causes much of this will only get worse as dipnetters flood the beach and leave their fishwaste behind them all over the beach. This attracts more gulls that crap in that relatively small area.
    I suspect it will only get worse until August then start to clear up.
    I hope they check the Kasilof beach as well as I suspect it may be just as bad.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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    Do you still go dipnetting and just clean your fish elsewhere? Camp up the road to not stay in the filth

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by medic2022 View Post
    Do you still go dipnetting and just clean your fish elsewhere? Camp up the road to not stay in the filth
    It's your health so that is for you to decide. If you like standing in bacteria infested water all day getting wet from it then cleaning your fish in it and then sleeping in a tent on a beach infected with it by all means go ahead.
    It can't be that bad right? I mean they are only posting signs to warn you of it they are not closing the area down correct?
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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    I agree. Not my cup of tea. I'm just looking for other options at this point.

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    Member willphish4food's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kasilofchrisn View Post
    No I am not a commercial fisherman.
    Commercial fish would likely not be affected by this because those fish are caught in areas miles away and not near the bacterial affected beaches and those fish have not passed the affected beaches before being caught.
    If the water is contaminated then yes commercial fishing should be shut down. Just like it was during the Exxon Valdez spill.
    Ok if we don't close the beach what about allowing people to clean their fish on the beach?
    The article states we should not swim in or drink the water. So we should allow people to wade in it all day and rinse their fish in it?
    I don't want a nanny state either but how many people bring their kids down to the beach while they dipnet and let the kids play in the Bacteria infested...aaah...err.....I mean on the beach in the sand and water. The kids don't have much choice and/or probably don't know any better.
    Anyway The signs are a good Idea I just worry that may not be enough as most probably will ignore them anyway. Just like a private property sign it might as well be a come in were open neon sign to some people.
    Then again I refuse to dipnet from that beach anyway. Way too crowded and trashed for my taste.
    Couple questions;
    1. Where do the fish processors dump their waste?
    2. Do seagulls ever congregate around commercial fishing vessels or fish processors?
    3. Where do the millions of hooligan and millions of pinks go to rot? Do these attract and or feed gulls at all?
    4. If an overabundance of seagulls is a problem, then why not address this overabundance, rather than trying to move them elsewhere by penalizing people?

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    I have to wonder if this is just a case that there is indeed a certain bacteria level present, but it doesn't necessarily mean it's enough to make anybody real sick. Kinda like saying there is radioactivity in a certain area so we need to post it, but it would take far more levels of exposure for it to be a real danger to anybody.

    But if it indeed is a real danger then I say how bought we have a nice little seagull shoot? I mean I remember them shooting seagulls at the Kenai airport when they became dangerous in numbers to air traffic. So how would this be any different? Get a couple hundred guys or so out there with shotguns and take out a couple thousand or so........lol.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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