Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Dilemma

  1. #1
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Kachemak Bay Alaska
    Posts
    4,214

    Default Dilemma

    Thinking about a newer plane for teaching Float-Plane Flying



    I have loved my little PA-11 90 horse for the last 9 years or so.... She is the perfect float-Plane trainer.
    Because she is so light and nimble, I am able to get into lakes that are usually reserved for big engine Super Cubs and Husky's.

    But after years in a semi-salty lake and an Airport only yards from the ocean, she is starting to show the need for some heavy duty loving in a nice hangar. The problem is that here in Homer finding longer term affordable hangar space is impossible.

    So I am faced with a heart wrenching decision, either:

    A. Sell the Dragon-Lady and buy another affordable Cub ( maybe with a starter and lights) for seaplane instruction,,,,,,,

    B. Find an out of town hangar and A&P for a long term rebuild which would put me out of business for a year.

    C. Close up shop and find a new hobby job.


    Selling the Dragon-Lady would be like shooting Old Yeller...

    Thoughts ???
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

  2. #2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    Thinking about a newer plane for teaching Float-Plane Flying



    I have loved my little PA-11 90 horse for the last 9 years or so.... She is the perfect float-Plane trainer.
    Because she is so light and nimble, I am able to get into lakes that are usually reserved for big engine Super Cubs and Husky's.

    But after years in a semi-salty lake and an Airport only yards from the ocean, she is starting to show the need for some heavy duty loving in a nice hangar. The problem is that here in Homer finding longer term affordable hangar space is impossible.

    So I am faced with a heart wrenching decision, either:

    A. Sell the Dragon-Lady and buy another affordable Cub ( maybe with a starter and lights) for seaplane instruction,,,,,,,

    B. Find an out of town hangar and A&P for a long term rebuild which would put me out of business for a year.

    C. Close up shop and find a new hobby job.


    Selling the Dragon-Lady would be like shooting Old Yeller...

    Thoughts ???
    I thought you where moving to FL or AZ or some such place anyway?

  3. #3
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Kachemak Bay Alaska
    Posts
    4,214

    Default

    If I can find a place worth-while in a warmer/dryer area, it would only be for two or three months in the winter. ( I have already made a couple recon trips and nothing gets me excited so far)
    That would theoretically leave time for the four month Kachemak Bay summer flying/training season.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

  4. #4
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Kachemak Bay Alaska
    Posts
    4,214

    Default

    While a starter is not really a big deal for a personal use aircraft. it becomes a little more desirable when you are spending 6-8 hours a day instructing and you have to unbuckle, crawl out and hand start the plane 5-12 times a day while trying not to whack another expensive plane our get your wings caught in the shore-line trees. According to my logs my little plane has made 3,500+ landings on floats alone.
    Sooner or later the hand propping will get me...

    And yes I have even eyed a couple lower end C-180s. While I could cut the hours of flight time because of the extra speed between points, the 300% increase in fuel consumption and higher maintenance bills would make it not very attractive for lessons. Yes I could do a little more multi person flight seeing, but that was only major business concern 5 years ago. Tourism is way down in our area.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,461

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    While a starter is not really a big deal for a personal use aircraft. it becomes a little more desirable when you are spending 6-8 hours a day instructing and you have to unbuckle, crawl out and hand start the plane 5-12 times a day while trying not to whack another expensive plane our get your wings caught in the shore-line trees. According to my logs my little plane has made 3,500+ landings on floats alone.
    Sooner or later the hand propping will get me...

    And yes I have even eyed a couple lower end C-180s. While I could cut the hours of flight time because of the extra speed between points, the 300% increase in fuel consumption and higher maintenance bills would make it not very attractive for lessons. Yes I could do a little more multi person flight seeing, but that was only major business concern 5 years ago. Tourism is way down in our area.
    Thought of moving up to something like a Citabria Scout on floats? Reasonable performance, flaps, and thumb propping? Not a bad choice, if one can be found witnin a reasonable price range . . .

  6. #6
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Kachemak Bay Alaska
    Posts
    4,214

    Default

    Yes that is a thought. The 8gcbc Scout with a 180 horse and a constant speed prop is OK on floats. I do not care for them on wheels compared to other planes in the same price range.

    Oddly enough I have flown a lot of 7GCBC 150 horse Citabrias on wheels or skis, but never a 150 horse Citabria on floats.
    I wonder how they do ?? As long as I could stay away from an old wooden wing spar.

    I keep hoping to run into a nice 172 or C-170B with a180 horse engine and a float kit. So far that combo has proven illusive and expensive. There are a couple 220 hp C-172s out there with Franklins. But the whole legal weight and balance thing gets pretty fuzzy when I ask the seller some questions. Plus some of them are so expensive that I might as well just buy another C-180.

    Some lakes I use are rather short with tall trees or solid granite on the ends.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,461

    Default

    Trees, like some friends, should be kept at arm's length. Solid granite should be avoided at all costs . . .

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Talkeetna, AK
    Posts
    62

    Default

    PA-12 for sale on alaska list flaps PA 18 this and that 35 grand. Might b worth a look at.

  9. #9

    Default

    FP: I fly a Cessna 172 180hp on Aqua floats. The plane is a great trainer, but the Aqua floats are pretty draggy. You won't be able to go to half the lakes you like to do training in. I think if it was on a set of EDOs it would've been a much nicer performer. Or better yet C-172XP (210 hp with the constant speed prop)! This would be my choice if I was in your shoes.

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    Yes that is a thought. The 8gcbc Scout with a 180 horse and a constant speed prop is OK on floats. I do not care for them on wheels compared to other planes in the same price range.

    Oddly enough I have flown a lot of 7GCBC 150 horse Citabrias on wheels or skis, but never a 150 horse Citabria on floats.
    I wonder how they do ?? As long as I could stay away from an old wooden wing spar.

    I keep hoping to run into a nice 172 or C-170B with a180 horse engine and a float kit. So far that combo has proven illusive and expensive. There are a couple 220 hp C-172s out there with Franklins. But the whole legal weight and balance thing gets pretty fuzzy when I ask the seller some questions. Plus some of them are so expensive that I might as well just buy another C-180.

    Some lakes I use are rather short with tall trees or solid granite on the ends.
    The Citabria is a 1 person float plane, the legal gross weight isn't enough for 2 people and fuel. The Scout is a great plane on floats, I had one and only sold it due to it's need for Avgas for the 0-360 out in the bush. I ended up going with an 0-320 cub because of that.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •