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Thread: set up for the Russian

  1. #1

    Default set up for the Russian

    What are you guys using for your set on the russian (bait cast). I will have my 8 wieght also.

    I know what flies I am using...

    What style weights are you using?
    Are you attaching it to a swivel? a
    About how long of a leader are you using (between the weight and the fly).


    I just want to tie a handful up prior to flying up to ANC in a couple weeks. Thanks

  2. #2
    Member alaskachuck's Avatar
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    5-7 feet of 25lb maxim leader.......I do use a swivel from my fly line to my leader for reds. Reds don't give a crap about it.... When you bust off a leader it is a quick tie to replace. I use split shots. Easy to add or remove
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  3. #3
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    The weight setup I use is surgical tubing and lead rolls or pencil lead. I buy 1/4" or 3/16" tubing then get the appropriate size lead either in a roll or as pencil lead. I think the rolls are cheaper, but your mileage may vary. Run your line through a short piece of the tubing, then moisten a similar-sized length of lead and slide it into the tubing alongside the line. Pull out enough line so that your weight is 18 inches above the end of your line, tie on the fly and have at it. I like this method because you can match the amount of lead you use to the stream conditions. It takes a bit of practice to get it right, but not all that much. You should be able to feel the lead bouncing over the bottom. If it's not moving, you're too heavy, and if the weight is too light you won't feel it making contact with the rocky stream bed. The other advantage of this method is that I almost never get snagged on the stream bottom. I don't use a separate leader or a swivel. The regulation on flies reads as follows: "One unweighted, single-hook, unbaited fly with gap between point and shank of 3/8" or less is allowed. The fly must weigh less than 1/4 oz. If weights are used they must be at least 18" above the fly." Good luck.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by ANCguy View Post
    The weight setup I use is surgical tubing and lead rolls or pencil lead. I buy 1/4" or 3/16" tubing then get the appropriate size lead either in a roll or as pencil lead. I think the rolls are cheaper, but your mileage may vary. Run your line through a short piece of the tubing, then moisten a similar-sized length of lead and slide it into the tubing alongside the line. Pull out enough line so that your weight is 18 inches above the end of your line, tie on the fly and have at it. I like this method because you can match the amount of lead you use to the stream conditions. It takes a bit of practice to get it right, but not all that much. You should be able to feel the lead bouncing over the bottom. If it's not moving, you're too heavy, and if the weight is too light you won't feel it making contact with the rocky stream bed. The other advantage of this method is that I almost never get snagged on the stream bottom. I don't use a separate leader or a swivel. The regulation on flies reads as follows: "One unweighted, single-hook, unbaited fly with gap between point and shank of 3/8" or less is allowed. The fly must weigh less than 1/4 oz. If weights are used they must be at least 18" above the fly." Good luck.

    thats how I was doing it in 1985, I guess not much has changed. You never know if somebody has come up with a new idea that I have not seen since I was up there (2010).

  5. #5
    Member Raptor_1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tjfslaughter View Post
    thats how I was doing it in 1985, I guess not much has changed. You never know if somebody has come up with a new idea that I have not seen since I was up there (2010).
    Theres no need to get fancy or over complicate things at all for reds. A section of mono and split shots like Chuck mentioned is all you need. A lot less rig time, cheaper, and catches just as many fish as some fancy get up. Ask a hundred dif people and you'll get a hundred dif ways to rig for reds but split shots are by far the easiest and most economical. Keep it simple.
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  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Raptor_1 View Post
    Theres no need to get fancy or over complicate things at all for reds. A section of mono and split shots like Chuck mentioned is all you need. A lot less rig time, cheaper, and catches just as many fish as some fancy get up. Ask a hundred dif people and you'll get a hundred dif ways to rig for reds but split shots are by far the easiest and most economical. Keep it simple.
    Got it. Now I just need to keep an eye on the fish counts. I am getting up there around the 19th of July. I assume the russian will be slow and the Kenai a little better but I need to wait and see.

  7. #7
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    I believe they take about a week or so to get to the Russian once they enter the river. I fly in the 24th and will go directly to the lower or middle Kenai.

  8. #8
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    I use 3 foot of 30lb maxim attached to my fly line with a nail knot, to that I attach 5 foot of 20lb fluorocarbon to the 30lb with a double nail knot. I use the knot to keep my spit shots from sliding down my line. I make up several leaders with flies tied on ready to go in my vest, so I can keep fishing when the action is hot.

    I keep a hook sharpener in my vest and sharpen my hooks after each fish or snag.

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  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by ANCguy View Post
    The weight setup I use is surgical tubing and lead rolls or pencil lead. I buy 1/4" or 3/16" tubing then get the appropriate size lead either in a roll or as pencil lead. I think the rolls are cheaper, but your mileage may vary. Run your line through a short piece of the tubing, then moisten a similar-sized length of lead and slide it into the tubing alongside the line. Pull out enough line so that your weight is 18 inches above the end of your line, tie on the fly and have at it. I like this method because you can match the amount of lead you use to the stream conditions. It takes a bit of practice to get it right, but not all that much. You should be able to feel the lead bouncing over the bottom. If it's not moving, you're too heavy, and if the weight is too light you won't feel it making contact with the rocky stream bed. The other advantage of this method is that I almost never get snagged on the stream bottom. I don't use a separate leader or a swivel. The regulation on flies reads as follows: "One unweighted, single-hook, unbaited fly with gap between point and shank of 3/8" or less is allowed. The fly must weigh less than 1/4 oz. If weights are used they must be at least 18" above the fly." Good luck.
    shoot this whole time i had in my mind that the weight had to be fixed at 18" above the fly! stupid me..

  10. #10

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    I use a 50lb braided loop at the end of my fly line attached with heat shrink tubing supported by 3 nail knots using a 10lb maxima. I use a 3 ft long 30 lb fluro attached to my fly line by loop to loop connection. I add a rubber core sinker a couple inches below the loop connection. This set up makes it super easy to change the leader and adjust weight by adding small split shots above the rubber core sinker. Rubber core sinker makes sure that the split shots don't slide down.

  11. #11
    Member Gr is for Greg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SalmonSlut View Post
    shoot this whole time i had in my mind that the weight had to be fixed at 18" above the fly! stupid me..
    It's at least 18" above the fly. Lots of people do more. I've questioned this before, because if I'm ever targeting trout, I usually keep my split shot a little closer to the fly or bead than 18". But here you have a "fly fishing only" section of river, where nobody is really doing traditional fly fishing with rules that are meant for a specific purpose (i.e. prevent people from using split shot to essentially create a weighted hook = snagging), and yet if I were actually there fly fishing for trout, I might get a ticket? Any thoughts on that one? (Sorry to hijack the thread) - Gr
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gr is for Greg View Post
    It's at least 18" above the fly. Lots of people do more. I've questioned this before, because if I'm ever targeting trout, I usually keep my split shot a little closer to the fly or bead than 18". But here you have a "fly fishing only" section of river, where nobody is really doing traditional fly fishing with rules that are meant for a specific purpose (i.e. prevent people from using split shot to essentially create a weighted hook = snagging), and yet if I were actually there fly fishing for trout, I might get a ticket? Any thoughts on that one? (Sorry to hijack the thread) - Gr
    I rarely have weight within 24" of my fly fishing reds or trout so its never been a problem for me. I would definitely expect a ticket if the weight is closer, regardless of your target species.

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