Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 29

Thread: glass for a kid 7mm-08

  1. #1
    Member scott_rn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    power commuting twixt the valley and anchorage
    Posts
    803

    Default glass for a kid 7mm-08

    I don't shoot a lot, nor do I own a lot of guns. I want my kid to have a chance at shooting a caribou this year. So, after reading brwnbr's thread http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...l-get-ammo-for and speaking with a lot of folks who shoot more than I do, I ordered a 7mm-08 and will go pick it up tomorrow or the next day. I comissioned a co-worker to load up some very light ammo that my kid can start out with.

    I also plan to haul this gun in the mountains as a backup for my bow while sheep hunting.

    Regarding the optics, I am leaning toward redfield revenge, 3x9-42 because it seems a standard size for hunting scopes. I like that redfield are made in the U.S. and have a good warranty, and it comes in under $200.

    I have mostly shot iron sights and archery and I want to make sure this is a decent combo. Anyone have any other advice?

    Thanks
    My only gear sponsor is the salvation army - Dick Griffith

  2. #2
    Member 1Cor15:19's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Dillingham, AK
    Posts
    2,482

    Default

    Sounds like a nice combo. Can't imagine a scenario where your kid will be mismatched when hunting caribou.
    Foolishness is a moral category, not an intellectual one.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,121

    Default

    Scott: I have a Redfield Revolution 2x7 that is nice and clear, was a great price here locally ($160) and it is made in the USA. Although my favorite scopes I have on 2 rifles are Swaro Z3 3x9's, I would not hesitate to buy another Revolution. The Revenge series is made in the Philippines to cut costs. I hope whatever you mount on the -08 does well for both you and your kiddo! Brian

  4. #4
    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Mat-Su
    Posts
    2,150

    Default

    +1 on what AKBEE said. I have a Revolution in a 2x7 and it is, to my eyes, every bit as good as my leupold VX2's. They are made in the same factory as the Leupolds whereas the Revenges are made elsewhere..

  5. #5
    Member scott_rn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    power commuting twixt the valley and anchorage
    Posts
    803

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AKBEE View Post
    Scott: I have a Redfield Revolution 2x7 that is nice and clear, was a great price here locally ($160) and it is made in the USA. Although my favorite scopes I have on 2 rifles are Swaro Z3 3x9's, I would not hesitate to buy another Revolution. The Revenge series is made in the Philippines to cut costs. I hope whatever you mount on the -08 does well for both you and your kiddo! Brian
    Good to know about the revolution vs. revenge. Out of curiosity, why 2x7 over 3x9?

    That's a good deal, where did you find that price? (if you don't mind revealing your sources)
    My only gear sponsor is the salvation army - Dick Griffith

  6. #6
    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Mat-Su
    Posts
    2,150

    Default

    That place thats named after the worlds longest river has them for about $165.

    Ok, maybe its the worlds second longest river

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,121

    Default

    Scott: I prefer low profile scopes unless designed for distance rifles/shooting when size won't matter and simply liked the size of the 2x7. I bought it at Mtn View Sports. You are welcome to look at it or even mount it on the rifle and take it to the range if you like before making a decision. There are quite a few great scopes out there now that don't cost an arm and a leg and I think the Revolution series is spot on. If you want to try it out- I can have my wife drop it by the unit for you. BEE
    Quote Originally Posted by scott_rn View Post
    Good to know about the revolution vs. revenge. Out of curiosity, why 2x7 over 3x9?

    That's a good deal, where did you find that price? (if you don't mind revealing your sources)

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SwampView AK, Overlooking Mt. Mckinley and Points Beyond.
    Posts
    8,815

    Default

    Were it me, making the decision for a "Kid", I'd keep it simple, and install a fixed power scope of 4X or even 2.5 or 3X.

    I would not encourage long shots, because back-up would be more difficult, so high X wouldn't be needed.

    I think that if you don't have a good rest, preparation, or position a higher X could be problematic.

    SOTN
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  9. #9
    Member Smokey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Central Illinois
    Posts
    3,334

    Default

    I am with AKBEE, I am a big fellow and have a hard time with scopes with big objectives needing med to high mts to clear the barrel for mounting. Youths have even smaller mugs then mine and you may find anything with a 40mm objective is just too high for your young hunter to shoot comfortably. I have no problem with the Redfield line but I would look more into a 2 x 7 x 33 or a fixed 4 or 6 Like Smitty says. Its hard enough for us old experienced chaps to adjust the scopes properly for the conditions let alone add that to the mix for a young hunter!
    When asked what state I live in I say "The State of Confusion", better known as IL....

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Smitty of the North View Post
    Were it me, making the decision for a "Kid", I'd keep it simple, and install a fixed power scope of 4X or even 2.5 or 3X.

    I would not encourage long shots, because back-up would be more difficult, so high X wouldn't be needed.

    I think that if you don't have a good rest, preparation, or position a higher X could be problematic.

    SOTN
    A scope isn't an optical spotting scope it's an aiming device and as long as the reticles are in the center and stay in place shot to shot use the KISS principle. Also children tend to climb up on the comb and get too close due to shorter eye reliefs with higher magnification scopes . Scopes aren't welded on and can be replaced if needed as the youngster developes his shooting skills.
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

    On the road of life..... Pot holes keep things interesting !

  11. #11
    Member The Kid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Los Anchorage
    Posts
    1,089

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by brav01 View Post
    A scope isn't an optical spotting scope it's an aiming device and as long as the reticles are in the center and stay in place shot to shot use the KISS principle. Also children tend to climb up on the comb and get too close due to shorter eye reliefs with higher magnification scopes . Scopes aren't welded on and can be replaced if needed as the youngster developes his shooting skills.

    While I am apt to agree with all of the above, I have not seen a quality fixed power scope on the rack anywhere as of late. The ones I have seen have also cost more than the redfield line does. My advice would lean toward the redfield 2-7 and leave it on 4x until the young shooter has a good rest with an animal in range, can't see as to where it would hurt to turn it up to 7x then.

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SwampView AK, Overlooking Mt. Mckinley and Points Beyond.
    Posts
    8,815

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by The Kid View Post
    While I am apt to agree with all of the above, I have not seen a quality fixed power scope on the rack anywhere as of late. The ones I have seen have also cost more than the redfield line does. My advice would lean toward the redfield 2-7 and leave it on 4x until the young shooter has a good rest with an animal in range, can't see as to where it would hurt to turn it up to 7x then.
    When you get into defining "quality scope ", that is largely a matter of perception.

    I have 2 New manufacture Weaver K 4s. One is on my wife's 7x57, and the other one on a rifle I use for off-hand shooting every week. They've both served well.

    Fixed power scopes of good quality are out there, and not too difficult to find.

    SOTN
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  13. #13
    Member highestview's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Haines
    Posts
    1,308

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Smitty of the North View Post
    When you get into defining "quality scope ", that is largely a matter of perception.

    I have 2 New manufacture Weaver K 4s. One is on my wife's 7x57, and the other one on a rifle I use for off-hand shooting every week. They've both served well.

    Fixed power scopes of good quality are out there, and not too difficult to find.

    SOTN
    I also have a new Weaver K-4 fixed on my Scout rifle. Excellent and excellent value for the money. The fixed 6 power would be excellent for caribou.
    Born in Alaska: The boundary lines have fallen for me in pleasant places; surely I have a delightful inheritance. Psalm 16:6

  14. #14
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    I can't come up with a single reason to choose a fixed over a variable. I would rather have my 2-7x32 set on 2x for brush and thick woods then kick it up to 6 or 7 for open country. If variables weren't reliable then perhaps I would have a different outlook but modern quality variables are just about bulletproof.

  15. #15
    Member hodgeman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction AK
    Posts
    4,056

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Smitty of the North View Post
    Were it me, making the decision for a "Kid", I'd keep it simple, and install a fixed power scope of 4X or even 2.5 or 3X.
    SOTN
    I can't agree more. I love fixed power scopes. Simple, lightweight, nothing to fiddle with.... on a 7-08 I think the Leupold 4x is hard to beat with generous (and more importantly) non-critical eye relief.

    I've shot game as close as 25' and as far as 300yds with a 4x....how much more flexible could you want?
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SwampView AK, Overlooking Mt. Mckinley and Points Beyond.
    Posts
    8,815

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    I can't come up with a single reason to choose a fixed over a variable. I would rather have my 2-7x32 set on 2x for brush and thick woods then kick it up to 6 or 7 for open country. If variables weren't reliable then perhaps I would have a different outlook but modern quality variables are just about bulletproof.
    For yourself, I'd agree.

    My reason, was to keep things simple for my wife or grandson. She isn't a gun nut like me. I wouldn't wanna try and explain scope power etc. to her.

    My S-I-L got mad at my B-I-L forchanging her scope power. He was just tryin to help, but it created a problem when it wasn't what she was used to.

    Anyone can unintentionally leave their scope at an unwanted power. That is something I can easily deal with, but a kid who is still learning could be a different story.

    Which could negate the advantages of a multi x scope.

    SOTN



    .
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    298

    Default

    I have a Redfield Revolution in 3x9x40 your welcome to test out. Got it from another forum member a while back and it's just sitting around right now.
    Life is too important to be taken seriously.

    Chinese proverb

  18. #18
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    I spent the time at the range with the bit am let him shoot at all powers and make adjustments to the point he was comfortable.

    10 yo son shot his first animal @ 175yds using a Savage 7-08 with a 3-9x40 Nikon BDC scope, shooting Hornady 139 GMX Superformance factory loads. Rest was a Barney's hunter frame.


  19. #19
    Member hodgeman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction AK
    Posts
    4,056

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    I spent the time at the range with the bit am let him shoot at all powers and make adjustments to the point he was comfortable.

    10 yo son shot his first animal @ 175yds using a Savage 7-08 with a 3-9x40 Nikon BDC scope, shooting Hornady 139 GMX Superformance factory loads. Rest was a Barney's hunter frame.

    Great pic LuJon... I keep looking for one of those left hand Savages myself. Lefty kid guns are darned hard to come by.Is that one of the Savage package deals that came with the scope?
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

  20. #20
    Member hodgeman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction AK
    Posts
    4,056

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Smitty of the North View Post
    My reason, was to keep things simple for my wife or grandson. She isn't a gun nut like me. I wouldn't wanna try and explain scope power etc. to her.

    My S-I-L got mad at my B-I-L forchanging her scope power. He was just tryin to help, but it created a problem when it wasn't what she was used to.

    Anyone can unintentionally leave their scope at an unwanted power. That is something I can easily deal with, but a kid who is still learning could be a different story.
    .
    I think for a kid one of the more important things is eliminating distractions... in a hunting situation I believe that controling the muzzle, focusing on the target and thinking about where your finger is (on the trigger or not) is plenty for young hunters to think about. Once kids do a lot of shooting and hunting they can graduate to variable powers if they choose.

    My kid's favorite is the scout rifle with the IER scope- he's kinda visually challenged anyway and the thick crosshairs just floating out there 12" in front of his face is just easier for him to deal with.

    I'm also wanting to experiment with the Aimpoint since it makes head position irrelevant- it might prove ideal in situations where multiple folks use the same rifle and might prove useful to kids- possibly the simplest scope to use out there.
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •