Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Quillback release/survival question

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Lewisville, TX
    Posts
    335

    Default Quillback release/survival question

    So here's something I hadn't given conscious thought to (though my subconscious has apparently been hard at work on it) - do different types of deepwater/non-pelagic rockfish have differing ability to recover from barotrauma? Thinking back, we've pulled quillbacks from depths up to 250' with no obvious signs of barotrauma i.e. their eyes weren't bugged out, nor were their air bladders sticking from their mouths, etc. On the other hand, silvergray and yelloweye rockfish that we caught in 80'-90' had everything all blown up.

    On our most recent trip, my brother had a couple quillbacks he'd caught which were still quite alive when he got back in, so he put them in a crab pot & suspended it at the dock about 40' down. Next morning, we pulled it up & the fish were frisky, lively & clearly ready to swim away if given the chance; there were no visible signs of barotrauma at all.

    I guess the simple way to ask is this: are quillback rockfish sturdier & hardier than other types of rockfish?

  2. #2
    Member FishGod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Fishing your hole before you get there
    Posts
    1,948

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Zeek the Greek View Post
    So here's something I hadn't given conscious thought to (though my subconscious has apparently been hard at work on it) - do different types of deepwater/non-pelagic rockfish have differing ability to recover from barotrauma? Thinking back, we've pulled quillbacks from depths up to 250' with no obvious signs of barotrauma i.e. their eyes weren't bugged out, nor were their air bladders sticking from their mouths, etc. On the other hand, silvergray and yelloweye rockfish that we caught in 80'-90' had everything all blown up.

    On our most recent trip, my brother had a couple quillbacks he'd caught which were still quite alive when he got back in, so he put them in a crab pot & suspended it at the dock about 40' down. Next morning, we pulled it up & the fish were frisky, lively & clearly ready to swim away if given the chance; there were no visible signs of barotrauma at all.

    I guess the simple way to ask is this: are quillback rockfish sturdier & hardier than other types of rockfish?
    I've had the pleasure of participating in a few rockfish studies. Yes, some rockfish fair better than others. Yelloweye rockfish had the highest survival rate (95% or so) while quilback and coppers had a 89% survival rate. *These numbers are off the top of my head. They may vary a percentage or two.
    Your bait stinks and your boat is ugly

  3. #3
    New member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    8

    Default

    Different rockfish species vary in the types and severity of barotrauma they experience, and the symptoms and severity can vary from fish to fish within a species. The structure of the swim bladder varies by species. For example black rockfish have a relatively thin-walled swim bladder that often tears as the fish is brought up. Barotrauma symptoms such as exophthalmia (popeye) are worse in bottom-dwelling species like yelloweye, China, and quillback rockfish because they have thicker, tougher bladders.

    There have been many studies in recent years with estimates of survival rate of fish released at the surface or fish released using a deepwater release device. Here are two articles from ADF&G:

    Hochhalter and Reed 2011. The effectiveness of deepwater release at improving the survival of discarded yelloweye rockfish. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 31:852-860.

    Hochhalter 2012. Modeling submergence success of discarded yelloweye rockfish (Sebastes ruberrimus) and quillback rockfish (Sebastes maliger): towards improved estimation of total fishery removals. Fisheries Research 127-128:142-147.

  4. #4
    Member carolinaboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Salt Lake Valley Utah
    Posts
    372

    Default

    Ak F & G provides this video on the site. Shows the different types of releases. Some fish looked wonky upon release at depth, then got their bearings and scooted on down. Most fish in the video were Quillbacks.

    the vimeo link was private and won't play here.


    The akf&g link might work.
    http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm...shconservation

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •