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Thread: Who works on/stocks parts for older 2 Stroke OMC in Anchorage?

  1. #1
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    Default Who works on/stocks parts for older 2 Stroke OMC in Anchorage?

    Is there anyone who works on/repairs or stocks parts for older 2-Stroke OMC outboards in Anchorage? And don't say Anchorage Small Engine Repair.

    I have a '69 4HP Evinrude Light Twin that has sat in a shed in FL for 14 years. Compression is low (40 psi) but it should still run. I just replaced basically everything (complete Ignition system-2 coils, condensers, points, new leads & plugs, new fuel pump, water pump, and a carb rebuild kit) and it ran for a total of five seconds and only after I sprayed WD40 into the cylinders.

    Depressing.

    Sparks at both cylinders but no fuel. (Dry spark plugs) There is fuel through the pump to the carb inlet via the squeeze ball on the tank. Can't even SMELL fuel.

    These engines are super simple, and this should have been a fairly straight-forward task. I did everything, or at least think I did everything, according to the Seloc book and used all new Sierra brand parts.

    Depressing.

  2. #2
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    Give these guys a shot:

    J Kimberly Service



    • (907) 349-1894


    6601 Arctic Blvd, Anchorage, AK 99518
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  3. #3

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    Spoiled one nailed it...they are pretty much OMC specialists and one of the few shops that would work on an outboard of that vintage. I was just over to J Kimberly's shop a few days ago and they are booked solid through early August. From the sound of it, you have a fuel line issue. I'd check everything through the carb intake. I had a little outboard that would run for a few seconds to a minute or two then die. Finally found that there was a small chunk of fuel line that had been peeled off by the barb when I installed a new primer bulb and was basically floating freely in the line. I could prime the motor and get it started but then that little chunk would flow up to where the to where the fuel line connector attaches to the outboard and starve it out. If it has an old fuel line/primer bulb, those should probably be replaced anyway..including ALL CONNECTORS. They may look fine but you can't see what going on inside. Hope that helps.

  4. #4
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    Yeah I'm thinking I messed up the carb rebuild, quite possible the needle valve is sticking and blocking fuel from entering the bowl (hence the reason I can't smell any fuel). Well, if those are guys are booked through the end of the summer, there is no sense in taking it to them to get it running right before winter. I'll hit again next week and see if I can find my mistake. (I know it's got to be something I did or didn't do.) Thanks for the info, guys.

  5. #5

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    If you were able to identify the problem, you could still order parts from J Kimberly or possibly...http://www.evinrudeonlineparts.com or quiz the guys at MarineEngine.com. As you say, your carb kit install may not have been successful but I'd still encourage you to look at connectors. They can get varnished up causing inadequate fuel flow or completely plugged....and if that happens, you won't be able to smell fuel simply because there is none there to smell.

  6. #6
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    This has actually gotten worse. I've worked on this engine off and on for the last month, and I can still can't make it start/run. Not only that, I've made things FAR FAR FAR worse by listening to other people's "advice." Somebody absolutely insisted that I MUST replace the starter spring (it's worn and doesn't pull the cord back in) BEFORE continuing to work on the engine. (Which, I had a new spring and fully panned on replacing the spring AFTER I got the engine running.) Because I'm working on it at his house, using his tools, I gave in after a brief resistance. Now I can't even pull the stater over.

    I've replaced every part with factory new parts and done everything, as near as I can tell, exactly according to the Seloc OMC manual.

    I'm so angry at the moment that, had this engine not been a gift from my now deceased father, I would have smashed it into oblivion by now and scattered the remaining debris into Cook Inlet.

    No one that I can find on the internet sells a fully assembled, ready to install, hand starter assembly. I can't get the hand starter back together properly, and, even if I could, I STILL have a fuel flow issue someplace. Summer is now essentially over. My son returns to the Lower 48 in two weeks until next summer. I've canceled one weekend trip after another all summer long for lack of an engine. Duck season opens in 36 days and I have no duck boat because I have no engine.

    I called J. Kimberly and the guy flat said "It's not going to happen." (Add to that, WHEN he's available to start working on it, which is well beyond when I need it done, it's $115 hr. Though, at this point, I'd gladly pay whatever price he asked.)

    Guess I'm pretty well screwed.

    The real pisser is, I used to do this stuff with my dad (who was a marine mechanic) for years as a teenager, but I never ever once saw him change a recoil starter, and I'm starting to wonder if that was just something he refused to do because of the stress level involved.

  7. #7

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    I have a 6 hp twin and I agree that those recoil starters can be a real pain....frustrated to tears type of pain. I think you'll get it figured out. However, if you don't, there is a place at Big Lake that is good too and it is Burkeshore Marina. Here is a link to their site: http://www.burkeshoremarina.com/

    I hope you get it back together soon

  8. #8

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    My opinion........ Relax!

    Frustration while working on anything is just cause for messing things up. You'll get it running, most likely better than it did before storage.

    Funny thing is I run a early 70s 9.9hp on my duck boat that my pops left me. I did nearly the same thing as you one winter not to long ago. I cussed and kicked things around in the garage for a month before sitting back one night staring at the motor remembering all the times I stood around helping my pops work on his outboards years ago. That next week after my adjusted attitude and bam everything fell in to place, it now runs like a dream and hasn't missed a duck season since his passing.

    For the motor, pull the spring again, might even have to do again after that. They, on any motor new and old can be a real pain they either pull great or don't work worth a piss. You will get. Next do as gar yak says, replace all fuel lines, pull the carb, clean thoroughly. Not sure what that motor has for moving fuel but if its a diaphragm pump take it off clean it, if you can take it a part see if the there a crease or cut in the diaphragm itself. If not put it back together.

    And remember its supposed to be fun, once it's running and you will know it better than anyone. She'll never leave ya stranded in the marsh, cause you'll know it inside and out.

    By the way that's one neat motor, it has been know to be one of the best little motors ever built, your lucky your dad left you such.

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