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Thread: Sheep Hunting food.

  1. #1
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    Default Sheep Hunting food.

    Starting to put together the food list for a buddies sheep hunt. Aside from mountain house and cliff bars, we thought of smoked salmon...as a good source of salt, protein, and calories...

    Cons...possible scavenger attractant...

    Thoughts on this idea?

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    Member Gr is for Greg's Avatar
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    Yeah, it does smell, but it's not a human smell, so it "shouldn't" increase your quarry's ability to sniff you out. Attracting bears would be the only thing I can think of as being a detriment. Make sure you keep it in a bear keg?? I have no experience with it, but seems like a good idea. -Gr
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    We bring a lot of vacuum packed salmon with us. No issues.

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    I like to take smoked salmon, game jerky, precooked bacon, peanut butter powder, bagels, tortillas, block cheese and home made trail mix. Oatmeal packets for breakfast and I just pour water straight into the packs to save on sticky mess in my cup. Spices for fresh meat.












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    Member ERL's Avatar
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    We sometimes take smoked salmon on our backpack hunts. We have never had problems with scavengers. I don't see why it would attract more than other food.

    The biggest con i see is it is relatively heavy (depending on how dry) and does not usually meet the 100 calories per ounce criteria.


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    I take a lot of beef jerky to eat while hiking. Mountain house, oat meal, coffee, coco, tang for water, energy bars and that's pretty much it. Any ptarmigan I see will land on the grill (in season of course :-) I lose 5 lbs on these trips. Can't say I look forward to that as it pretty much means I'm out of shape in the first place.
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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    I take snickers, they suck less than cliff bars. Day 6 I would rather eat tundra moss soaked in fish guts than another $&@?#% cliff bar!!!

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    I like to take smoked salmon, game jerky, precooked bacon, peanut butter powder, bagels, tortillas, block cheese and home made trail mix. Oatmeal packets for breakfast and I just pour water straight into the packs to save on sticky mess in my cup. Spices for fresh meat.












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    Member Kotton's Avatar
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    Stid,never heard of peanut butter powder.How does it taste?And we're do you get it?Might give it a go round this upcoming hunt.

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    Member LOCALAK907's Avatar
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    You can find peanut butter powder at fredmeyer health food section at dimond location in anchorage for sure. It's magical with Nutella spread!

  11. #11
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    My food list is quite simple
    oateal
    ramen soup
    freezdried
    snacks of jerky,few candy bars, trail mix of sorts..
    oh and I never go anywhere without coffee... (i have a few boullion cubes in my pack incase some gets wet and cold)

  12. #12
    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    Mountain house, jerky, instant oatmeal, tea, gatorade powder and BUTTER.

    Protein is good but for high output activities like a sheep hunt nothing beats fat for energy. Cheese is also good but butter is more calorie dense--1,830 vs 3,240. A stick of salted butter is 810 calories.

    1/2 stick per day. Usually add it to MH meals at supper but sometimes I just eat it as is. It's a bit unusual at first, biting off a hunk 'o butter, but it works like White Man's Muktuk!!

    I split the sticks at home and bag each half individually in sandwich bags and then put the lot in a gallon bag with a couple of cold-packs. Everything gets frozen. Just as the hike in starts, I activate the cold packs. It's a bit of extra weight but it keeps the butter solid (mostly). Once camp is found, the butter is stored in the coolest place available (creek, snow, under a rock etc.).

    Try it.
    If cave men had been trophy hunters the Wooly Mammoth would be alive today

  13. #13
    Member Ernie Scar's Avatar
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    Lots of good ideas here, I've changed up my food plans quite a bit over the years and am always looking for new ideas. A new hunting partner introduced me to Packet Gourmet and they're pretty good but they're not as simple as MH more like a Backpackers Pantry with little packets of extra stuff. So MH usually gets a nod as being the main course.

    My buddy and I usually bring 10 pounds of potatoes and 3-4 onions to be left at a main camp or cache to cook with sheep meat or just eat raw for a change in diet. We also grab a good selection of sliced cotto salami type meat and an assortment of cheese wedges that we pick up at Fred Meyer right before we head out of town. We'll take maybe a few things of the flat bagels and some tortia wraps that may or may not get left at the cache. Also last year we picked up a couple of bags of fresh green peas and carrots to eat raw for the first couple of days before they go bad which is a real treat as it seems like fresh greens is something I crave when I get out. Most of this heavier food is something we intend to eat in the first 5 days or so. We've also have been making our own granola type bars intended to be loaded with tons of calories but mostly because we have gotten kind of tired of the store bought variety even though there are a few that I do like and bring. Snickers to me are a great treat and I'll take about 5-6 of the king size bars that I'll bogard back at the cache for a treat when I come off the mountain. We bring large quantities of coffee also and if I bring instant I bring different flavors, got cross threaded with hazelnut once and I can't drink it anymore.

    First off I will say that I do like MH for it's simplicity but anymore every day in the field that I don't have to eat one is a pretty good day, I view them more as a way to sustain life when I'm in the field than something I really look forward to. Once a sheep is down I pretty much turn strait carnivore and it's nice to mix it up with assorted cheese, breads/wraps, potatoes and onions, spices and what not.

    Back before there were good message boards to get info from in my early days of backpack hunting I found a Cliff bar before the season that I thought was the end all to end all of power bars so I bought a ton of em. I went in the field with only one MH for everyday I planned on being in the field which 50% were spaghetti and all these Cliff Bars that were the same flavor. I ate only crow berries and blue berries on the last 3 days of the hunt and still wretch every time I see one of those Cliff Bars. If I have any advice it is to take variety, don't worry too much about weight you can eat the heavy perishables sooner and don't eat a bunch of what you're going to take on the hunt prior to the hunt unless it's just to see how your system reacts to it.

    Have a good hunt.

    Rowdy

  14. #14
    Member Bambistew's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Erik in AK View Post
    Just as the hike in starts, I activate the cold packs. It's a bit of extra weight but it keeps the butter solid (mostly). Once camp is found, the butter is stored in the coolest place available (creek, snow, under a rock etc.).

    Try it.
    I've been eating salted butter that was left out on the counter some times for weeks... When it starts to turn clear, it gets tossed. I don't think your extra precautions to keep it 'fresh' are really worth much besides added weight.

    Good idea though. I like butter mixed with just about everything.

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    Member RCBOWHUNTER's Avatar
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    I am trying Hawk Vittles this year instead of MH. I did a pretty thorough comparison on Cal/Oz on all dehydrated meals and HV was at the top. I am going with a BigSur Bar for Breakfast, Supreme Protein Bar and some Trail Mix for mid-morning snack, ProBar Meal bar and a packet of Justin's PB/Almond Butter for Lunch, Wilderness Athlete Meal Replacement, Trail Mix for Afternoon Snack, and HV for dinner with WA Hydrate/Recover drink. Throughout the day I will mix NUUN tablets with some of my water and have a GU packet as well. Gets me over 4000cal/day at about 2lbs of food/day.

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    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bambistew View Post
    I've been eating salted butter that was left out on the counter some times for weeks... When it starts to turn clear, it gets tossed. I don't think your extra precautions to keep it 'fresh' are really worth much besides added weight.

    Good idea though. I like butter mixed with just about everything.
    Bambi,
    Not keeping it fresh, keeping it firm enough to travel without being smashed. I can, and have, licked the butter out of the baggies but it's far easier to deal with with if it's at least semi-firm.
    If cave men had been trophy hunters the Wooly Mammoth would be alive today

  17. #17
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    I tried Hawk Vittles last year, and while I'll likely carry a few for variety this year, the fact that they take longer to hydrate than the other brands will keep me from using them as a primary dinner option. Sometimes when I roll into camp late I don't want to wait longer than necessary to get warm, get fed, and get into my bag. Some if their options sure are tasty, though.

  18. #18
    Member tekla's Avatar
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    I tried some crystal light margarita mix and some tequila on a hike last weekend. It was great. I think this year in the brooks range it will be quite nice to sit back and have a margarita after a long day but still be light on weight. Can't wait.

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