Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Elderly Lab throat calcification?

  1. #1
    Member akdodger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    South Central
    Posts
    171

    Default Elderly Lab throat calcification?

    Hey,

    My black lab and #1 sidekick is now 12.5 years old and starting to slow waaaayyyyy down. He is not in pain and is very well cared for but he has started to have the throat calcification thing which I'm told is a common thing in labs. Has anyone here experienced this and would be willing to share any advice on how to make it easy on my favorite labrador?

    Thanks
    “The perils of duck hunting are great - especially for the duck.” Walter Cronkite

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    124

    Default

    Are you talking about laryngeal paralysis?

    There is the tie back operation for that.

  3. #3
    Member Rob B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Eagle River, Alaska,
    Posts
    3,150

    Default

    I lost my 13 y/o lab to that. It sure was a sad way to see her go. I'm sorry yours has it. Yes there is an operation for it but I've heard it's not that successful. I wish you and your old pup the best.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
    27' Wooldridge Super Sport Offshore Pilothouse PRIME TIME!
    Kodiak Custom Fishing Tackle Pro Staff
    Heavy Hitter Fishing Crew
    MMSI# 338232859

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    221

    Default

    I have a retired husky (distance racer) who has it. He also is hypothyroid. Apparently dogs (commonly labs and huskies) who suffer from hypothyroidism get lar-par more frequently. We've considered the tie back surgery but felt that since he is managing ok at this point it wasn't warranted due to the potential side-effects and potential complications from the surgery (and while no one likes to mention that $ play into the equation, it can be a costly procedure and stressful procedure for an old dog). We do have to take some special precautions with him such as no more neck leads, keeping him indoors when it is hot out, and shortening the distance up his twice daily walks. I still feel like he can fulfill his role in our "pack" and is happy and comfortable doing so. As his condition changes, we continue to re-evaluate his treatment options. Thankfully, there has been little change in the past two years or so.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •