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Thread: scope zeroing problem on 1908 brazillian mauser 358 win.

  1. #1

    Default scope zeroing problem on 1908 brazillian mauser 358 win.

    I'm using the correct weaver mts on this rifle however with several scopes i cannot get enough elevation to zero this rifle...it shoots about a foot low with all the elevation i have available. obviously i am either using the wrong bases or they need shimmed. if it shimming they need which base should i shim, and what material is handy to use for shimming. i am hoping someone else has experience with this action, which i believe is a large ring mauser. any help would be greatly appreciated. mountazineer

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    Did you gett'em mixed up, front and rear?

    Just to make sure. I think they're different heigths.

    SOTN
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  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Smitty of the North View Post
    Did you gett'em mixed up, front and rear?

    Just to make sure. I think they're different heigths.

    SOTN
    no, they are different screw hole distances, the front is twice as wide as the rear.

  4. #4

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    Shim the rear. "Right" or wrong, I'm betting someone got a little enthused grinding on the top of the receiver when converting from mil form.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mountaineer View Post
    no, they are different screw hole distances, the front is twice as wide as the rear.
    OH,,, I'll take a look at my 98 rifle.

    Thanks
    SOTN
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

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    Member gunbugs's Avatar
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    Between .020" and .030" under the rear base should do the trick. you will probably need to fit new screws as well, as the increased thickness will reduce the already weak thread engagement on the mauser rear bridge. If you are near Fairbanks I can give you some shims.
    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by gunbugs View Post
    Between .020" and .030" under the rear base should do the trick. you will probably need to fit new screws as well, as the increased thickness will reduce the already weak thread engagement on the mauser rear bridge. If you are near Fairbanks I can give you some shims.
    that would be great! I am on Lakloey hill just outside of fairbanks 488-7144. I have long screws as i had to fix two stripped mount holes and tapped again for .146x48 holes with extra long screws. I'd really like to get this rifle going as it has a great er shaw barrel and has great accuracy potential. thanks, jeff

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    Member GD Yankee's Avatar
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    Maybe I haven't had enough coffee this morning.

    He says his scope is shooting low (full elevation and still shooting low) and you guys recommend shimming under the rear base? That seems bass ackwards. Shouldn't he shim the front to raise the point of aim of the scope?

    One way to check which ring is off is to mount the base (I'm assuming a single piece base?) on one ring at a time and see which ring has a gap between the ring and base. I agree the problem is probably that the front ring was probably ground off too much - therefore the front ring should have some shims put under the base to raise the mounting surface to the original pre-ground state.

    Another option is to make a "shim" with epoxy or acraglas. I had to do this for a VZ-24 with a heavily ground front ring. This provides a good description of how to do it:

    http://www.kenfarrell.com/instruction.html

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    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
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    That was my first thought too GDY. But, shimming the rear makes the cross hairs lower at same point of aim. Then bringing the crosshairs up to the target will bring the muzzle up to the correct point of aim....

  10. #10
    Member gunbugs's Avatar
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    You just have to remember that you are moving the rifle under the scope. The point of aim remains constant. You are moving the point of impact. Lifting the rear of the scope pushes the rear of the rifle down, elevating the point of impact.
    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

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    Quote Originally Posted by gunbugs View Post
    You just have to remember that you are moving the rifle under the scope. The point of aim remains constant. You are moving the point of ipact. Lifting the rear of the scope pushes the rear of the rifle down, elevating the point of impact.
    OK, NOW, I understand. Like GDY, I thought it the other way around.

    SOTN
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  12. #12

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    Think iron sights...elevating the rear sight raises POI

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