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Thread: remington 750 woodsmaster

  1. #1
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    Default remington 750 woodsmaster

    I was wondering if anyone has tried the new Remington 750 woodsmaster as I'm considering one with the 22" barrell in 35 whelen. Seems like it would be a nice all around quick handling rifle for here in the interior plus the price isn't to bad.

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    Question Remington 750 What?

    TC1,

    What is this rifle? The 740 (742/7400) is/was an autoloader. The 760/7600 is was a pump, I'm wondering what this one is. I don't keep up with the latest fads, I should get out more. Good shootin'.

    Murphy

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    Default updated version

    It's the updated version of the 7400, supposed to have some new improvements etc. I'm just curious as to the accuracy and reliability. I've never heard anything bad about the 7400 but I guess there was a few things they felt needed improving. I just like the Idea of fast follow-up shots for for big mean animals plus I think the 35 whelen is a good round thats under apreciated.

  4. #4

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    Over the years I've accumulated quite a bit of experience with the 742, 7400, 760 and 7600, and come to think of it with their predecessors, the model 8 and 141, in an assortment of calibers. I don't own any right now, but it doesn't mean I wouldn't pick up another if it came along at the right price in the right caliber. And as a matter of fact the 35 Whelen counts as the right caliber.

    You hear stories about reliability problems with the Remington autos, but I never had any with any of them. In fact, the metalic cartridge semiauto rifles have always seemed more reliable to me than semiauto shotguns or handguns. But then again, I was always careful about keeping the rifles clean and properly lubed, plus I was always careful about full length sizing and keeping pressures and LOA within standard specs.

    I'm not sure how I would feel about the semiauto for defensive carry, but would have no qualms hunting with it, if that's not a contradiction. I guess what I'm saying is I would happily hunt with it, but if I was tracking down a wounded bear or picking a gun to carry while fishing in heavy bear country, it wouldn't be my first choice.

    Caliber-wise I wouldn't hesitate. My favorite knock around rifle for casual carry in bear country is my Savage 99 in 358 Winchester, which is slightly less potent than the Whelen. But again, if I was fortunate enough to have an old Winchester 100 in 358, I probably wouldn't carry that for defense, even if I was crazy enough to use that rarity as a knockaround. But then some folks think I'm crazy to carry the 99-358 as a knockaround.

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    TC1,

    Though I have not tried the 750 Woodsmaster, I do have the 7400 in a 35 Whelen. It's a great gas-operated auto loader. If you look about, there are 10 rd mags available. the 7400 and 750 will interchange mags. I don't think you can really go wrong in a 35 Whelen auto loader. 3 round bursts will rattle your teeth but you can double tap this weapon accuratly with a little practice. I say it's a GO.
    God, Guns and Guts is what made America Great

  6. #6

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    Here's a bit more frame of reference for you- not on the 35 Whelen, but on the same types of bullets you might select for it.

    In more than 20 years of using it and several dozen head of game, I've recovered exactly one bullet from the 358 Winchester. A very large Kodiak buck was headed straight away full steam at about 80 yards and I hit it right at the base of the tail (Texas heart shot). The deer landed on its nose and skidded quite a ways without twitching. When I dressed it out, the bullet had gone full length down the back right under the backstrap and above the ribs, then full length down the neck right up agains the spine, then hit the back corner of the jaw, broke that and stopped. It must have gone through more than 5 feet of meat (always regret not measuring it at the time) before stopping.

    The bullet? It was one of those really "inferior" Winchester Silver Tips, a 200 grain factory load. The recovered bullet weighed 153 grains.

    Everything else is still flying as far as I know, including Noslers, Hornady's Remingtons, Speers, and a few others I probably forgot in weights ranging from 180 to 250. I haven't shot a bear with it, but in addition to deer it has taken one good sized bull moose and two Roosevelt elk. Might have to shoot a mastadon if I really want to recover another bullet.

    Even if none of those 35 caliber bullets has accounted for a bear in my hands, I have no doubts about adequacy of the bullets available. Add a little more velocity in the Whelen and stick in a premium bullet if you feel the need, and it can only get better. You better plan on doing some mastadon hunting of your own however, if you really hope to recover a bullet.

  7. #7

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    Well stated BrownBear!

    I have a buddy who is a one rifle man. His rifle is a Eddystone in 358 win. All of the rest of the guys have different guns for different game. Not this guy! He kills everything with the 358 and like you said he doesn't have to be particular at what angle he shooting from cuz it just shoots through everything. I have also seen him shoot his fair shair of fox/coyotes with that same gun shooting pistol bullets.

    It was once said that whatever the 308 will do the 06 will do a little better. The same thing can be said in contrast of the 358/35 whelen.

    I have been around my fair share of the various remington auto loaders and the two things about them I remember is that they are incredibly reliable function wise but their triggers suck!

  8. #8

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    Amen on the triggers!!!! That's the biggest reason they keep slipping through my hands.

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    Default 358 win.

    I also think the 358 winchester is an under apreciated cartridge due to magnum mania, I think browning is the only one chambering it in their BLR rifle which would make a nice quick handling gun.

  10. #10

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    The 750 Woodsmaster
    « Thread Started on Feb 14, 2007, 1:47pm » [Quote] [Modify] [Delete]
    The 750 Woodsmaster. I have one and also reload for it and no problems yet with it. I read where people have had problems so I started asking around and I have asked those here who hunt with me (in the Mississippi woods rain and humidity) if they have had problems none of them have had a problem. I ask them to ask the people they know who own one and neither do their friends who have bought one "none" so far have any problems with the 750. They all shoot the 30-06 and that totals 24 people I know and 14 reload for it. I am over 300 rounds now and no problems and 195 of those rounds are reloads. A very accurate round for the 30/06 750 Woodsmaster is 165gr trophy bonded bear claw and also the Sierra 165gr HPBT using Winchester Brass, 210 Fed primer, and 57gr IMR4350. They both shoot from 1 1/4 to 7/8 of an inch in my 750 and it will knock a deer down. This is not a High pressure load but will give from 2698 - 2710fps (chronographed) out of a 750 carbine. Here are the factory loads I tested just 4 weeks ago. Winchester 150gr power point, 150gr Silvertip, 150gr Silver Ballistic tip, Federal 150gr soft point, Remington 150gr core-lokt. All rounds are under 2 1/4 inch and there were no porblems with the action or holding zero as I have heard from some. I use a Leupold base and rings with a Burris Signature 1.5-6x40mm scope. I really do like mine. I believe the Leupold base and rings with the Burris Signature 1.5-6x40mm is a real nice set up. By the way I shot two groups under and inch with it yesterday using Remington core-lokt 150gr Factory ammo. I believe the site set up is part of my 750's good grouping. Also my hand load had one group measure .489 and that is bolt action accuracy for most shooters. Of course I have a custom bolt action rifle with a Lilja barrel that consistently shoots from .345" to .224" I really do like my 750 the more I use it. The only thing I wish was different was the triger. It creeps some but after a slight creep it then sets up and breaks fairly good at that point. I believe that I would be getting tighter groups if the tiger was better. But make no doubt, if you are a shooter and have worked at it, then the 750 is a very accurate rifle for a semi-auto. I just need to find a custom triger for my 750 carbine. Also this is a very well balanced rifle and it points greats, it is a very quick setup with the way it points and the 1.5-6x40mm field of view on 1.5 power. If any one knows of a good triger I could purchase or gunsmith that can make the triger better please reply to this post and let me know. I use the carbine from my tree stand in thick woods and hunting hogs at our hunting lease. I also use it in tight canyons in Arizona with the trophy bonded bear claw bullet when hunting Black Bear. I use my bolt action 300 Win Mag for pipe line, fields and when I hunt bear and elk in arizona that require long shots.
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    Default Remington 750

    Bought a new Rem 750 in 35 Whelen several weeks ago.. Took it out to the range and stoked it up with rem factory ammo. It jammed up on the 5th round. Couldn't retract bolt and the State range officer wouldn't let me leave the range with a live round in chamber. The trigger could be pull but it was as if the gun had been fired. He held the rifle pointed down range and told me to wack the operating rod handle with a leather mallet he brought to my booth. With no fingers on the trigger, I wacked the op handle and the rifle fired.
    Needless to say the rifle went back to Cabela's the next day. They would not refund the cash but did credit my credit card. I guess all the bad stuff I've heard is true, at least for me.
    I would still love to find a semi-auto in 35 Whelen!
    Last edited by aagrendel; 04-24-2008 at 17:59. Reason: spelling errors

  12. #12

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    I noticed that someone put up an old post of mine concerning the 750 Woodsmaster. It is a great shooter and here is how it shot with Remington factory ammo.

    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
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    Default

    I had a 742 several years ago in 30/06. It was a pretty accurate rifle for an auto loader but the locking lugs wore and burred causing the bolt to stick sometimes; well it stuck once at the range and only partially locked, but still fired, so much force threw the bolt back into the buffer and cracked the stock, jammed the bolt back in the buffer and separated the barrel from the reciever. I sent the rifle back to remington and they rebuilt the rifle, cost $400. I checked out the bolt and the newer model 7400 locking lugs have been tapered to prevent burring. I haven't shot it since, my dad now has the rifle and I don't think he has fired it more than 2 or 3 times in the past 15 years. I am a bolt action or single shot rifle man now and will probably never buy an autoloader except for an AR for plinking. Just keep an eye on the locking lugs of the bolt and the locking grooves in the breech and you should be OK with the new 750.

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by OKElkHunter View Post
    I had a 742 several years ago in 30/06. It was a pretty accurate rifle for an auto loader but the locking lugs wore and burred causing the bolt to stick sometimes; well it stuck once at the range and only partially locked, but still fired, so much force threw the bolt back into the buffer and cracked the stock, jammed the bolt back in the buffer and separated the barrel from the reciever. I sent the rifle back to remington and they rebuilt the rifle, cost $400. I checked out the bolt and the newer model 7400 locking lugs have been tapered to prevent burring. I haven't shot it since, my dad now has the rifle and I don't think he has fired it more than 2 or 3 times in the past 15 years. I am a bolt action or single shot rifle man now and will probably never buy an autoloader except for an AR for plinking. Just keep an eye on the locking lugs of the bolt and the locking grooves in the breech and you should be OK with the new 750.
    There are new modifications that were done to the 750 and it is different than the 7400 in design and one will not have the same problems that the 7400 had. What new problems might exsist I am not sure of if any.
    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
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