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Thread: too expensive?

  1. #1

    Question too expensive?

    I keep reading posts that talk about some HUNTING bullets that are too expensive to shoot. Since it's arguably the cheapest and most important factor in humanely dispatching animals, I don't see where the cost comes into the picture in deciding what bullet to use. I can see people deciding which one to use by what works (might not be an expensive bullet at all) for them, but cost? But my question is this: just how many hunting bullets do you shoot in a year, including practice, sighting in, etc., with the beast (not your spouse) you hunt with?
    If you like getting kicked by a mule...then you'll "love" shooting my .458.

  2. #2
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    There are times I practice with cheaper ammunition and reload cheaper bullets. As the season gets closer, change over to what I'll be using for hunting. Shoot? About 150-200 rounds from the .375. with at least the last 40 rounds with the bullets I will use on the trip. I also shoot a lot of .22, the concept of shooting is the same. In preparation for our hunt last year she shot a brick of .22 and then 60 rounds of 7mm-08 prior to the hunt. She had previoiusly shot 40 rounds of the 7mm.

  3. #3

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    The shooting log I have maintained for over 30 years says I range from 8250 to 23,900 rounds per year, with the average falling somewhere between 12,000 and 15,000.

    Not all are premiums, and in fact only around 2,000 a year are even jacketed.

    But even if all the jacketed were premiums, it would still be less money than a lot of folks spend on a single hunt, all things considered.

    Heck, if even half the jacketed ones were premiums, it would be less than lots of folks spend on new guns in an average year.

    And then don't shoot them enoughto get good at it because ammo is too expensive.

    Sheesh!

  4. #4

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    I agree, that's why I started reloading. No replacement for practice with what you are going to be using. Making a clean one shot kill sure beats chasing around an animal for a second shot. Not to mention the confidence you will have when you get in the field. Some calibers are more expensive than others to shoot, but these days, you need to take that into consideration. Although, getting into reloading is pretty expensive depending on what equipment you get. For what I spent on reloading equipment, I could have bought about 15 boxes of premium ammo for the 300 RUM. But, I shot my RUM a lot more before last hunting season than I did since I bought the gun in 2002.

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    Member Alaskacajun's Avatar
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    I shoot Barnes and Nosler, it doesn't matter to me how much they cost. I probably put 50 rounds or so a year through my hunting rifles. I put a few thousand through my AR's (55gr FMJ) and a lot more through the .22's........ So far this year I've shot about 50 of the .375 RUM's and have 80 more loaded and ready to go....

    I like to shoot...

    - Clint

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    Member shphtr's Avatar
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    For an exact number I have records of all rounds shot but I would estimate I shoot 800 to 1500 handoads all with premium bullets in the 6 months or so prior to hunting season - almost exclusively magnums.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaskacajun View Post
    I shoot Barnes and Nosler, it doesn't matter to me how much they cost. I probably put 50 rounds or so a year through my hunting rifles. I put a few thousand through my AR's (55gr FMJ) and a lot more through the .22's........ So far this year I've shot about 50 of the .375 RUM's and have 80 more loaded and ready to go....

    I like to shoot...

    - Clint
    doesn't matter to me how much they cost just like to shoot the best for my application and I buy good bullets to hunt with.
    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
    THE MIND OF A SCHOLAR
    THE HEART OF A CHILD
    THE HIDE OF A RHINOCEROS

  8. #8

    Talking $4.00 gas

    It cost me around $120.00 to fill up on gas...it makes the bullets seem rather cheap when compared to just that, let alone all the other stuff. I practice with cheaper bullets also, but run a couple boxes of my chosen hunting bullets (Barnes X) thru, before hunting season. We all know folks that have spent the farm on a custom rifle, and shoot the cheapest bullets they can find...and some of these folks are the same one's that put the cheapest scope on the market on it, but that's another thread. I guess it comes down to "how good is good?"
    If you like getting kicked by a mule...then you'll "love" shooting my .458.

  9. #9
    Member Kay9Cop's Avatar
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    To me, it just seems like wasted money when I shoot a Barnes TSX down range at a piece of paper. Four petals and 100% copper isn't killing the paper any more dead. Sure, the cost is minimal compared to the cost of my guns or the money I spend on hunts but, why waste money if you don't have to. A dollar a pop for some of the bigger calibers I shoot is crazy when I can shoot something similiar (boattail hollow point) for $.25 to $.40 a bullet. I shoot the cheap stuff for practice (Sierra usually) then switch to premiums a couple weeks before I head out for a hunt.

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    If you assume that a premium bullet is that much better, fine. IMHO, they usually aren’t needed.

    I use Noslers in my 7 Mags because they are high velocity cartridges, and I might have a run-in with a bear. I see no reason to waste money on them for 7x57, 280, 30-30, or 338, especially since I don’t hunt with “light for caliber” bullets, anyway.

    Buying bullets is discretionary spending for most of us. You can compare prices of other things in order to justify the cost of premium bullets, but they won’t cost any less.

    Why buy into the hype that you need a more expensive bullet? Why, the next thing you know, you’ll be wanting a bigger gun, AND more expensive bullets to boot. It’d be like wipin your hiney with a hoop, there’s no end to it. Until, you run outa money of course.

    Smitty of the North

  11. #11
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    Wink If you need them use them.

    I"ll have to agree with Smitty, bullets have come a long way. In the standard caliber any well made bullet may do. As for the magnums they stress bullets, and their makers have to produce a bullet that both expands well, and holds together when used at diffrent impact velocitys, example 30 06, and 300 RUM. A tough task indeed! If it"s big, and has claws, and bites back ,I might just spend the money! In that case shooting with the standard stuff, and then dialing in with the premiums, just before the hunt makes sense as some have already pointed out. Bill
    ; for them that honour me I will honour, and they that despise me shall be lightly esteemed. 1 SAMUEL 2;30

  12. #12
    Member NDTerminator's Avatar
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    I load the same bullets to practice with as I use to hunt. Some calibers I use standard stuff like Sierra Pro Hunters or Hornady VMax, while others I use premium stuff like Nosler Accubond or Hornady Interbond. I haven't kept track, but I imagine I run a good 4-5K rounds a year total (not counting shotgun shells, add another 1-2K for that).

    Midway just loves me when I send in an internet order...

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    Member shphtr's Avatar
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    Smile

    I work up my loads with the same bullet I plan to hunt with and then fine tune/practice with the SAME combination of components (this means same powder lot number also) that has produced the degree of accuracy that meets or exceeds my minimum requirements for the type and style of hunting I participate in. Based on my prior experiences I choose not to be involved in any last minute accuracy search when a sudden change to a different bullet prior to leaving for a hunt demonstrates unsatisfactory accuracy performance. I realize there are lots of ways "to skin this cat" but this is how I now prepare my hunting loads and have found it to work well for me.

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