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Thread: how much anchor rode?

  1. #1
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    Default how much anchor rode?

    Have not tried anchoring yet, but finally got around to checking the rode locker on my boat. I have 30 feet of chain and 240 feet of rode. Is this enough for a Bayliner 2859 that will be used in PWS? If not what do you recommend?

    Thanks?

    Ken

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    Member kobuk's Avatar
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    What size and type of anchor, chain and rope? Your rope length is plenty to anchor up for the night in most coves. I use a minimum of 4:1 scope and I have 35 feet of 5/16 chain and a bruce anchor. I can't remember the weight of the anchor, somewhere around 15 lbs, and 1/2 nylon rope. My boat is quite a bit lighter than yours. I have a 23 foot bolton aluminum boat. I could probably go smaller and lighter especially since I have to pull by hand and it's pretty heavy but we camp out a lot and I have already had some sleepless nights when we are having a blow but we haven't slipped yet. If you think it's going to blow, increase your scope and give yourself plenty of room for swing and I also like to put something down to slow my swinging. Make sure you set your anchor real good and just keep an eye on it. It's not a bad idea to set your depth and or anchor alarm until you get comfortable with your sets. Have fun!

  3. #3

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    If you are talking about anchoring for the night in a cove that would be adequate. However, I would recommend 50' of chain for your boat. Many of the anchorages in PWS are relatively shallow, ~50'. With more chain you can fit in tighter spots and not need so much scope.
    If anchoring for fishing you'll want more rode.

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    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    I'd say you have it right. As mentioned, most PWs anchorages are fairly shallow and protected. (Get the Lethcoes Cruising guide to PWS to help find adequate spots). Thus you'll only use 100' of that rode.
    We fish in less than 200' of water and rarely use that much rode when butt fishing. I suppose it depends on how deep you plan to fish. You could always keep an extra 100' in a locker to clip on if you need it.
    It's also a good idea to have a spare anchor setup in the event you lose yours. Again, the Lethcoe guide will help to avoid places with debris on the bottom that could snag your anchor permanently.
    BK

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    Member spoiled one's Avatar
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    You have received some good information here. I run 600' of 1/2'' three strand, 40'+ of 3/8'' chain, and a 33 pound bruce anchor. I have a 100+ pounds of ground tackle and we sleep very well at night. Your 240' will be plenty for night time anchoring, but lacking if you want to anchor for flatfish IMO.
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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    My first couple seasons I had only a 250' rode and while it is enough for most anchorages in most conditions, I feel much better with a 600' rode.

    The thing is there are some anchorages where when you anchor far enough from shore to allow for swing you can be setting anchor in 100' of water, and with 240' rode that is nowhere near enough scope if the wind picks up, even in 50' of water that is less than the recomended 7:1 ratio if you have a storm blowing through. Also in the event you have trouble with your boat and need to anchor to keep from drifting into open water you might need alot more scope as the sound gets really deep really fast in most areas. If you happen to be fishing in 300' of water, drifting deeper and your engine won't start a 600' rode will allow you to keep put while you figure out what is wrong vs. being adrift at the mercy of the current and wind.

    As mentioned the weight of your anchor and chain is important. Even on my little boat my anchor and chain weigh 40#'s. And as mentioned make sure you set your anchor. I have a bruce clone and while it is good for most conditions, it will not set in kelp. Make sure you back down pretty good to set the anchor.
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    Member Blue Thunder's Avatar
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    guru I have the same boat and with the 3 strand rope I could not get much over 300' in the anchor locker. I went with the 8 plait (spelling?) and get 600' plus 40' of chain. I some times have to have some one spread the rope in the locker a little, but it all fits in there with no real problem. I like the 8 plait rope as it will not get all the kinks in it and works much better.
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    Member DMan's Avatar
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    I run 500' of 1/2 inch 3 strand and 90' of 1/4 G4 chain with a 33 pound Bruce. 100 lbs. on the ground. I like lots of weight on the ground for when I anchor deep.
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    Member Soundfisher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    My first couple seasons I had only a 250' rode and while it is enough for most anchorages in most conditions, I feel much better with a 600' rode.

    The thing is there are some anchorages where when you anchor far enough from shore to allow for swing you can be setting anchor in 100' of water, and with 240' rode that is nowhere near enough scope if the wind picks up, even in 50' of water that is less than the recomended 7:1 ratio if you have a storm blowing through. Also in the event you have trouble with your boat and need to anchor to keep from drifting into open water you might need alot more scope as the sound gets really deep really fast in most areas. If you happen to be fishing in 300' of water, drifting deeper and your engine won't start a 600' rode will allow you to keep put while you figure out what is wrong vs. being adrift at the mercy of the current and wind.

    As mentioned the weight of your anchor and chain is important. Even on my little boat my anchor and chain weigh 40#'s. And as mentioned make sure you set your anchor. I have a bruce clone and while it is good for most conditions, it will not set in kelp. Make sure you back down pretty good to set the anchor.
    Good advice. I would not be out there without 600 feet. Its steep and deep out there. Those rocks come fast if you have a problem. You can be be 200 feet from shore and still in 500 feet of water. DON"T skimp.

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