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Thread: Increasing your line WT. on the same rod and reel.

  1. #1

    Default Increasing your line WT. on the same rod and reel.

    What ya'lls opinion on having a 7wt rod and going to a 8wt line? and disadvantages to this, besides the fact that you will have less line.

    I have a 7wt and a 8wt and I want to bump them up to 8 and 9 respectively. I think it will make my trip a little more enjoyable for trout and salmon fishing.

    Or should I keep the 7 wt and just bump the 8 to a 9wt?

  2. #2

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    Depends on what you primarily fish for... If you keep your 7wt rod and have 8-9 wt line it will be a bit harder to reach out with your casts for trout. It won't matter if you fish for reds and do the "flip". I used a 7 wt last year with 8 wt line and it worked well for reds, but when I was in Valdez Silver fishing it sucked.... casting and stripping was a chore! I would just keep the 7 wt rod and 7 wt line imo.

  3. #3
    Member G_Smolt's Avatar
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    This is called "overlining", and it is a fairly common practice.

    My client rods are 7wts, and I overline them with 8wt lines to make casting easier for folk without a whole lot of flyfishing experience. The weight of one line size larger helps the 20-to-30 foot range most, but also makes distance bombs easier because you need less line speed for the increased mass to maintain equivalent energy through turnover.

    Put your 8wt line on the 7wt rod and cast a bit - you might really like it.

  4. #4

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    Good to know! I appreciate the info. I might just buy an extra spool so i don't have to switch so much.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by G_Smolt View Post
    This is called "overlining", and it is a fairly common practice.

    My client rods are 7wts, and I overline them with 8wt lines to make casting easier for folk without a whole lot of flyfishing experience. The weight of one line size larger helps the 20-to-30 foot range most, but also makes distance bombs easier because you need less line speed for the increased mass to maintain equivalent energy through turnover.

    Put your 8wt line on the 7wt rod and cast a bit - you might really like it.
    Great explanation. That's why Scientific Anglers kicked over the apple cart with their Head Start lines- more line weight packed into shorter heads for beginners as well as heavy flies and short casts. Other line outfits are following suit now.

    Factor in the "spine" of an individual rod model as well. Some, like the TFO TiCRX, are really stout for their weight. Even with almost 50 years of casting behind me, I find that those rods have to be "lined up" as a matter of course. Others with softer spines profit from "lining down" when you're holding a lot of line in the air. The Loomis Cross Current comes to mind. It's easy to overload if you get more than the usual line out, as with some of the steelhead tapers.

  6. #6

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    I tend to over line depending on the length of the rod and action. Most of my 10ft+ rods are over lined.
    Piscor Ergo Sum

  7. #7

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    How much can you over line? 1wt or 2. Can you go from 7-9?!

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by ccooper88 View Post
    How much can you over line? 1wt or 2. Can you go from 7-9?!
    Depends entirely on the make and model of rod, the casting distance, what you tie on the end of the line, and your casting style and experience. Not all 7wt rods are the same, any more than fly casters are the same.

  9. #9

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    I'm more concerned with using 9 wt line on a 7-8wt reel. I have the rods to use 7-8-9 but I didn't want to buy a new reel. Just a spool.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by ccooper88 View Post
    ...using 9 wt line on a 7-8wt reel.
    You can certainly do it, but with lots less backing. If the reel is already stuffed with backing, simply trading out the lines on the same spool will require you to remove some.

    A work around with a new spool might be to cut off about half the running line on the back of your fly line, if you want approximately the same amount of backing. Yet another possibility if you don't want to do that is to use braid for your backing. I just traded out 100 yards of 20# Dacron for the same of 35# Orvis Gel Spun braided backing. The 6-weight reel went from nearly overstuffed to looking only about 2/3 full. Nice to have the extra leeway. That 35# Gel Spun is only about as big around as 10# mono, so it took up very little space at all.

  11. #11

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    Scientific Anglers makes a line called the "magnum taper" that is over-lined half a weight from what is stated on the box. I.E. a 7 wt line fishes like a 7.5 or so. This is my go to line for all my big fly and indicator fishing, I fish a 7wt rod with a 7wt magnum taper and it is a sweet set up. It shoots through the guides and when you open your loop up will comfortably throw a thingamabobber, bead, and split shot 60-70 feet. It also throws dolly llamas and other big nasty stuff pretty well. The nice thing about it is that at shorter distances you can also fish lighter stuff with a tight loop. Great all around line.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Armo_Ak View Post
    Scientific Anglers makes a line called the "magnum taper" that is over-lined half a weight from what is stated on the box. I.E. a 7 wt line fishes like a 7.5 or so. This is my go to line for all my big fly and indicator fishing, I fish a 7wt rod with a 7wt magnum taper and it is a sweet set up. It shoots through the guides and when you open your loop up will comfortably throw a thingamabobber, bead, and split shot 60-70 feet. It also throws dolly llamas and other big nasty stuff pretty well. The nice thing about it is that at shorter distances you can also fish lighter stuff with a tight loop. Great all around line.
    That sounds good, I was researching what line I wanted to get. That helps.

  13. #13

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    Look at the Scientific Angler Titan Taper and the Rio Outbound shorts as well. The SA Titan are a full size heavier and the Outbounds are a double bump, two grain weights heavier. With either of these lines you would buy them for the rod weight you are throwing, ie; buy a 9 for a 9 or what ever.

    Both these lines are shorter heads and make casting big wind resistant bugs and split shot a dream. They load the rod quick and deep.
    "The Tug is the Drug"

  14. #14
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    Many rod and line matchups are designed for the "high line speed" cast and would be considered underlined by those of us who don't practice it. The companies have various criteria for defining line weight, and it's usually not based on grain weight, which would be a big help. Any time you get a new rod you should try a few lines on it if possible to see what casts best. As far as I'm interested, if it loads decently on a single back cast and lands gently, then it is a good match even if the label says different.

  15. #15
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    I usually overline by one weight. I think probably because I am not as "high speed" as most of the newer rods...The heavier line helps me to load the rod better.

  16. #16
    Member icb12's Avatar
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    IMO

    There are only 2 legit reasons to overline a rod. 1) you are new to fly fishing and you need the heavier line to help get the "feel". 2) you need to bomb line with minimal back casting. (example: bonefishing)

    Ok- Im adding a third. 3) Turning over ridiculously heavy things on the business end of your line. (this is borderline though because I feel it has more to do with line geometry than weight-though a little extra heft helps)

    That said; there are specific lines for all of those tasks which are designed heavier than normal.

    If a rod is too fast for you; get a slower rod, or practice more. Manufacturers make many different rods for a reason; they are intended for different styles/types of fishing. Over lining a rod that was Designed to be fast with a recommended line weight is kind of like driving a sports car in 1st gear. It's just not what it was meant to do. If you can't/don't want to drive fast- then don't buy a sports car.

    Rods are made for certain types of fishing. Uber fast rods for super high line speed, Slow rods for finesse and dry work, and rods for everything in between. Get a rod suited for the task you want it to do. And get a line that matches what the rod is going to be used for most.

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by icb12 View Post
    IMO

    There are only 2 legit reasons to overline a rod. 1) you are new to fly fishing and you need the heavier line to help get the "feel". 2) you need to bomb line with minimal back casting. (example: bonefishing)

    Ok- Im adding a third. 3) Turning over ridiculously heavy things on the business end of your line. (this is borderline though because I feel it has more to do with line geometry than weight-though a little extra heft helps)

    That said; there are specific lines for all of those tasks which are designed heavier than normal.

    If a rod is too fast for you; get a slower rod, or practice more. Manufacturers make many different rods for a reason; they are intended for different styles/types of fishing. Over lining a rod that was Designed to be fast with a recommended line weight is kind of like driving a sports car in 1st gear. It's just not what it was meant to do. If you can't/don't want to drive fast- then don't buy a sports car.

    Rods are made for certain types of fishing. Uber fast rods for super high line speed, Slow rods for finesse and dry work, and rods for everything in between. Get a rod suited for the task you want it to do. And get a line that matches what the rod is going to be used for most.
    I have a high end rod labelled for 4-7wts. What say you?

  18. #18
    Member DannerAK's Avatar
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    Haha! Get 3 extra spools.
    "The North wind is cold no matter what direction it's blowing"

  19. #19
    Member G_Smolt's Avatar
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    Rods are factory "matched" to the best-fit AFTMA standard.

    Having said that, casting is pure physics married to technique - nothing more, nothing less.

    Can you cast a 9wt line on a 5wt rod? Yes.

    Can you cast a 5wt line on a 9wt rod? MmHmm.

    Should you cast what you like and are comfortable with?

    Absolutely.

    In this day and age, the line taper/weight/length combinations (as well as rod taper/relative speed/feel combinations) are positively STAGGERING in their multitude. Some lines (Rio OutBound, AirFlo 40+) are actually one to three "rod weights" heavier than normal - others, like the Rio LT (and the old cortland 5 series) are actually at the bottom end of the "rod weight" spectrum...By the same token, some rods (most notably, the TFO lines) are 2 and even 3 weights "heavier" than their listed weights, when compared to the industry standard on a parabola board.

    Cast what you like, and what allows you to perform to the best of YOUR abilities - not the perceived abilities of rod advertising.

    You will often find that the fish don't care either way.

  20. #20
    Member icb12's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    I have a high end rod labelled for 4-7wts. What say you?
    I'd say-- what feels good?? If its 4- then throw 4. If its 14- then throw that. It's your rod man.

    Im just saying that putting a 6wt line on my 4wt finesse trying to make it into something it's not - isnt the right solution. Overlinig my Pieroway tactical slows it down dramatically. It makes it easy to cast. But it's a rod MEANT to be fast, and with the recommended line, it's got a lot of raw power. And it's pretty unforgiving, it definitely has a different timing/style than some if my other rods. Me personally; I adapt my style to what's in my hand and what's in front of me. I don't try and force "my" style into every rod I own. It's a constant learning experience for me.

    Obviously everyone is different. Hence I prefaced my last comment with "IMO". That's exactly what it was.

    Bottom line: cast whatever feels good to you. What I said or what anyone said on the Internet doesn't matter. The only way to find out is to try it. Buy or borrow lines. Try them out. If you like it. Rock on. Go fishing. If you don't- then get something else. And go fishing.

    edit: I once broke a rod and having no spare spent the rest of the day casting 6 wt line on injun joes 3 wt. it works fine. Hell I even caught fish. But IMO it Wasnt matching what the rod was designed to do.

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