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Thread: Thumb Cove info

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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    Default Thumb Cove info

    Anyone ever stayed at the porcupine cabin in thumb cove? Can you tell me about the mooring bouy? How far from shore (is it still there), or the gradient at the tideline at the cabin?? Not sure if I will use the bouy or anchor attached to the shore. Have the cabin for Friday and Saturday night - hoping to go east a ways to see if we can put some white meat in the freezer.

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    Member Andy82Hoyt's Avatar
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    I stayed there two weeks ago, the mooring bouy is a long ways away like maybe a mile from the cabin and I'm not sure how far from shore it is. I anchored up about 100 yards infront of the cabin. Then just took the onflatable into shore. The beach gradient was not really steep at all. Beautiful place that is for sure. The saw and ax were still there on the 5th, outhouse was clean.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bullelkklr View Post
    Anyone ever stayed at the porcupine cabin in thumb cove? Can you tell me about the mooring bouy? How far from shore (is it still there), or the gradient at the tideline at the cabin?? Not sure if I will use the bouy or anchor attached to the shore. Have the cabin for Friday and Saturday night - hoping to go east a ways to see if we can put some white meat in the freezer.
    Bullelkklr,

    Many years ago, the state had white mooring bouys in front of both the state cabins. But the state pulled them years ago. As of last July, there are no mooring near the cabins.

    For the Porcupine cabin, we anchor to the left of the cabin when looking at the shore from the boat in about 50-60 feet of water. This tucks you into the bight in the shore line way left of where people anchor for the night. The bottom drops off to deeper water, so I tie from the anchor to a tree on shore to stop any drifing into deeper water. The shore line and the anchor rode meet at Polyform bouy I setup at the surface. I leave the setup in place while we are staying at the cabin. This bight also has a less rocky shore line at the lower stages of the the tide. I use a kayak to get to and from the shore.

    The one drawback to this anchor location is Miller's landing drops off and picks up their daily kayakers at this beach. Even though I use sinking 3 stranded rope to tie to shore, if I am around, I tell the Miller Landing charter skipper about the line I have running out to the boat.

    The cabin is in spectacular setting. Enjoy.

    Doug

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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    You guys are great. Thanks for the info. I will use my bungi cord system. My anchor rode floats....but we will not have it there during the daytime. Thank you again. This site is awesome for chilling my worries!

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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    Tried to give you some rep,,,but must spread some first! Randy

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    Member AKMarmot's Avatar
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    As stated the best is to anchor right out front & left of the cabin, deep & protected. We tent camp between the two cabins multiple weekends a summer & use the two anchor buddy system with a 100' of floating poly pro tied off the back to a tree by the outhouse sign. Never have had a problem in 8+ yrs.

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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    I have about 300 foot of stern rope that I can let back out to the anchor so it sounds like I should be good. I will find out for sure! Thanks for the help - appreciate it all! randy

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    Does anybody let their boat go dry at Porcupine Cabin? I have an aluminum skiff and if the tide timing works I might not hassle with anchoring offshore and figuring out the retrieval process. Is the bottom decent?

    Great info on here, thanks!

    edit: If I do need to stay offshore it sounds like the 'anchor buddy' is a favorite solution (maybe two connected together). Where in Seward might carry these?

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    Member akdeweyj's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fuhrerak View Post
    Does anybody let their boat go dry at Porcupine Cabin? I have an aluminum skiff and if the tide timing works I might not hassle with anchoring offshore and figuring out the retrieval process. Is the bottom decent?

    Great info on here, thanks!

    edit: If I do need to stay offshore it sounds like the 'anchor buddy' is a favorite solution (maybe two connected together). Where in Seward might carry these?
    Try the Fish House.
    2007 24ft NorthRiver OS
    Twin 175 Suzuki's
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    MMSI #338033856

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    Tried the Fish House, they don't have the Anchor Buddy pre-made bungies, but they have 1/2" shock cord for $1.39 per foot. Might just make my own when I have time. Thanks!

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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    1/2 inch shock or bungie cord works very good for me so far. I am using it at times to pull out a Hewes 220OP. I have two 100' sections of 5/8" bungie that I got offline for 40$ a spool (100'). Then I run 600' of rope to shore. I clip my bungie to the end of the chain at the anchor. First I go to shore and drop off someone and have them pay out the 600' of shore line as I back out to where I want to drop anchor. Drop and set the anchor (with the bungie clipped - don't forget (yes, I have 1 time). Have the shore person pull you back in. Hop out. Tie off to shore and then I tie in a couple loops and hook up an anchor buddy in the shore line to keep the boat from drifting so much. I have done this a lot with multiple sized boats and it works. I don't sleep good at night in the cabins as I worry about the boat but it does work.

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    Member Daveintheburbs's Avatar
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    Your method sounds interesting. How does this work if you get a strong onshore wind? Seems like if you can pull it to shore it could get there on it's own?

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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daveintheburbs View Post
    Your method sounds interesting. How does this work if you get a strong onshore wind? Seems like if you can pull it to shore it could get there on it's own?
    It depends on the tide. I have had it go dry several times...that is the worrysome part. Sometimes I want it to go dry. A couple times she has gone dry right next to a big rock. A lot depends on what the tide is doing when you drop the hook. Maybe I have gotten lucky or maybe I am just good :-) But I have probably anchored this way in a zodiac, 180 searunner, and a 220 ocean pro no less than 150 times and not had a problem....(but I did have some trouble sleeping or sleep interrupted by a shore excursion to see what the boat was doing).

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    Member Daveintheburbs's Avatar
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    Thanks, yeah I know about that "trouble sleeping " thing when I'm not aboard.

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