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Thread: Check out this 17 ft. 8in x 45 in. square stern canoe:

  1. #1
    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    Default Check out this 17 ft. 8in x 45 in. square stern canoe:

    This here is a Frontiersman canoe, they were built in BC, and the company went out of business a very long time ago, might have been 1978-79. If you go from the nose cap to the end of the transom, it's an 18 ft. canoe. but from inside of transom to the actual bow.....it's 17 ft 8 in. At the widest point of the canoe, it has a depth of 15.5". Judging by the Hull ID number, it was built in 1978. The lay-up appears to be 18oz woven roving, polyester resin, and foam hull strengtheners glassed in with chopped strand mat tape. It was originally a 70's "pickle-green" colored gel coat finish that had faded to a hideous mint-green. The transom was rotten, and flotation pod was glassed right up to the transom.

    With the hull ID number on the bottom of the wine glass transom, I didn't want to loose that historically significant portion of the canoe, so I cut half of the flotation pod out, along with the inside fiberglass layer that glassed in the old plywood transom board. I then pulled out the old foam, filled what was left with new foam, and fiberglassed in a new transom board.

    The yoke was an unsightly molded fiberglass deal, this was cut out and used to trace a hardwood replacement. The seats were 60 degree beveled hardwood planks, so those were also cut the same. A little bit of hunter green oil-based paint, black oil-based paint for the gunwales, u-bolts for lining the canoe, and a transom lift built, giving it 4 inches extra height.

    This cheap canoe project took about 2 days. Such a nice old canoe doesn't deserve to get abused, but rather, paddled, and motored in deeper waters. It will be a great fly-fishing/duck hunting kind of canoe, beamy enough for shootin from the canoe, stand-up paddling, or standing while fly fishing. Surface drives won't work well with the stern shape. About the ideal motor for this rig, is a 9.9 two-stroke. I just picked up a half round removal bit for the router, I may run a strip of UHMW across the entire keel all the way up the bow, running all the way to the bottom of the transom board. With that router bit, I can hollow out one side of the strip of UHMW so that it fits skin-tight onto the round keel. I could potentially run aluminum tubing in the keel as a backer for the bolts. The keel empty on the inside....a piece of 3/4" in. aluminum tubing would fit right in there.

    As I portage it, the weight feels right around 120-130 lbs.


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    Mainer,

    First off....I like your work and taste!

    It may be because I'm an old traditionalist but yes canoes are supposed to be green.

    That is a great design.....I love it....perfect for the uses you mentioned. An easy pusher but enough width for stability for fishing and duck shooting.

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    Member cristancanoe's Avatar
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    Nice job! Do you have any before pics for comparison?

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    Thanks Vern,

    Cristen, no before pictures, but it was very unsightly. Luckily, the 18 oz woven roving was perfectly preserved, the only damage to the gel-coat was one quarter sized chip at the stern, and at the bow.

    Only got about $850 into the entire rig, some people don't know what they got! The hardwood was left-over oak that my neighbor had, and I already had paint. Going to hidden lake with it today, see how she handles two malamutes and myself. Little bit of fishing for the elusive laker....then hike the engineer lake trail that ties into the back-side of hidden lake.
    Last edited by Michael Strahan; 08-12-2013 at 20:32. Reason: poster request

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    Let us know what you use for power......I would think a 5Hp would do nicely on lakes.....but then I'm not a speed freak....just like to keep my motor weight down.

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    As always a great save on a once again fine canoe. Enjoy your day.
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    Mainer: Very nice restoration! Hope it handles as nicely as it looks. Hope the malamutes don't overheat in this overly warm weather...

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by VernAK View Post
    Let us know what you use for power......I would think a 5Hp would do nicely on lakes.....but then I'm not a speed freak....just like to keep my motor weight down.
    Hey, thanks Bee and Amigo

    Vern, I think you're right. Paddling solo, I was reading 3.5-4.0 mph on the GPS. Into a 15 mph head wind, I was getting about 3 mph. For most of the lakes I fish for lake trout, a 4-5 hp two stroke would be all that's needed. A 9.9 two stroke, although plenty light, they don't run slow enough for trolling. The winds picked up on Hidden Lake something fierce, was stuck for 18 hours waiting for the winds to die down. Very dry ride in the big waves, was really impressed. I wouldn't have been stuck, if I had a small motor.

    My last 5 hp motor was a merc, it was a single cylinder. That thing just about rattled my wrist apart, 5000 rpm's on a single cylinder engine isn't my cup of tea. The four stroke single cylinder ones are just as bad. I do know of a nice unused 4hp Johnson twin cylinder owned by an old man, think it's a 1994 model. It looked new in his garage, not even missing paint. My father and all my uncles ran little twin cylinder Johnsons, they idle down real low, and still have good torque due to the twin cylinder design. 4 hp for 30 lbs of transom weight......might be a good combo for this old canoe.

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    couple pictures after surfing the waves back to shore:

    The older fella said he'll trade that 4hp johson for a hand-held GPS that I don't use, along with a laser range finder that I also don't use.


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    the work on the anoe is great as always it looks great SID

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    31 lbs on the scale, 128 psi in cylinder number 1, 126 psi in cylinder number 2. Still got the spark plugs with white paint on them, from when the motor was originally painted. Made in Belgium from what I read on the ID plate code.

    Don't think I've been in a Johnson-powered canoe for over 17 years, last time I recall, caught a couple chain pickerel from my father's 2.5 hp Johnson-powered Grumman canoe. Should be a dandy motor for a wine-glass stern, will post GPS speeds after I find the time to get this on the water.

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    So you stayed dry in those whitecaps ?? I would have my rain gear on in my HB....LOL

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    mainer,

    That should make a good motor for your canoe. My recent experiences with top brand one cylinder outboards hasn't been good.
    They are terribly noisy through that air intake box.

    I've still got a 65 Evinrude Ducktwin that I just gave to my niece.....sweet runner.....and parts are available on-line.

    I don't know if there is a twin 3.5 -4 hp made anymore.

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    no sir, not a single lower horsepower twin cylinder made. about the lightest twins made, are the tohatsu/nissan/merc 9.9 hp outboards weighing in at 81 lbs.

    next lightest twin is the new suzuki 9.9 weighing in at 87 lbs.

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    I have a old Johnson 20h/p on my 14' Lund and it moves right at 29mph
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    Quote Originally Posted by Amigo Will View Post
    I have a old Johnson 20h/p on my 14' Lund and it moves right at 29mph
    that boat scoots right along i'd say.

    Funny messing with the little johnson, it' actually a 1989 model, when I pulled the model number and referenced it. I'll have to excuse the 87 yr. old man, he may have got his years mixed up. Brings back a lot of memories tuning this old johnson. It has that low speed lean/rich jet that is adjustable. I remember trolling large streamers flies/heavy sinking line for salmon with my father in some fast current, the motor wouldn't idle right, so we had to tie off the canoe while he tried to get the lean/rich adjustment right. Had to do the same, and put a dot on both the idle and lean/rich adjustments with a paint marker. Once you get those two items dialed in, boy do these johnsons idle like a swiss watch!

    Was always told by my father/uncles that the johnsons were always underrated regarding power. I do remember what a 5 hp two stroke merc felt like power-wise, that single cylinder rattle trap was a dog with two people, so will test out this one today, see what kind of speed I get.

  17. #17
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    I've seen little allen wrenchs shortened some and tacked to the adjustment screws making it easier to adjust on the fly
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    Just got back, great little fly fishing trip. The motor will push the canoe up to 11 mph with myself and two Malamutes, but it likes to be run around 1/2-3/4 throttle in the 8-9mph range. At 11 mph, the wine glass stern digs in a bit too much and the bow raises a bit. Drop down to 3/4 throttle, the bow settles in, and the canoe scoots along well.

    Trolling speed was set right at 2.5 mph, the rainbow trout had no problem finding the #8 olive wooly bugger. Idle was slightly erratic until the fuel cleaner mixed in with the fresh gas had made it clear through the fuel hose. Six hours of trolling and full speed runs, burnt about a gallon of gas.

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    Mainer,

    It sounds like that 8-9 mph is the sweet spot and is typical for canoe hulls. The increased speed pushes the hull toward planing for which the hull is not designed. Nothing wrong with cruising along at 8-9 mph and looking at the country. Here in Alaska we tend to over-power our canoes because of fast river currents, long distances to travel and shallow water running.

    Are you a lake trout fisherman?

    Vern

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    Olive wooly buggers are deadly...........haven't had much luck with the black ones

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