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Thread: Lubricating lug nuts?

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    Default Lubricating lug nuts?

    Should a person put lubricant on the lug nuts/studs of a saltwater boat trailer? If so, what do you use?

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    Member ak_cowboy's Avatar
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    I just use neverseize. Make sure to check the torque occasionally

    sent from my igloo

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    I use the same stuff I got at the gun store for my AR-15 on all my wheel studs. Don't have a salt water trailer, but if I get one I'll start with that and upgrade as needed.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ak_cowboy View Post
    I just use neverseize. Make sure to check the torque occasionally

    sent from my igloo
    Make sure to check before and after every trip. Putting lubricant on your lug nuts can make it very easy for them to come off.
    "Beware the man with only one gun; he may know how to use it."

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    Word of caution using either anti-seize or any type of lube, the nuts will over torque very easy then you risk broken studs. Not hard to accomplish. Generally, the only place to put anti-seize is the mating surface of the wheel/hub.
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

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    I use a torque wrench and marine anti seize. I check mine before every trip. I don't torque as much as without antiseize. Never had one come off.

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    Friction. Using a lubricant changes the clamping power thus lowering the thread friction. I've seen many lugs loosen from anti-seize, even when rattled on with giant impact.
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

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    Quote Originally Posted by REFAK View Post
    Should a person put lubricant on the lug nuts/studs of a saltwater boat trailer? If so, what do you use?
    Only if you want to be able to remove them later on. Most of my boat is aluminum with stainless fasteners for this I use antisieze with aluminum. for steel onto steel or cast iron . I use antisieze with the copper additive. Just get one can with aluminum and it will work fine. Get the right torgue and check once in a while. I change four sets of snow tires every year and don't have wheel nuts coming loose. Use the air impact to change then torque all the nuts.
    dennis

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    Anti-sieze is the product to use if one uses anything, then torque with a torque wrench. One thing that is grossly incorrect is equating anti-sieze with any lubricant; IT IS NOT A LUBRICANT, it is an anti-corrosion compound and should NEVER be used as a lubricant.

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    Clean and dry threads is the way to go. Wet threads will cause an over torque situation and make the wheel studs go beyond the yield point of the metal. Using standard published torque specs, of course. I have an old Bowman catalog that says torque values should be reduced 60% when using their torque specs and a Bowmaloy fastener. But still, that is sketchy if you ask me. The only time I use anti-seize on a wheel fastener is when the trailer doesn't travel far and it's in the water all the time. Like you guys in SE that have three block trip to the boat ramp.

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    Member alaskabliss's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by .338WM View Post
    Anti-sieze is the product to use if one uses anything, then torque with a torque wrench. One thing that is grossly incorrect is equating anti-sieze with any lubricant; IT IS NOT A LUBRICANT, it is an anti-corrosion compound and should NEVER be used as a lubricant.
    Actually anti-sieze acts as a lubricant. It changes the friction coeffiecency when torqing up.

    A dry bolt has a friction coefficent of .8 and lubricated is .15. The original antiseize was listed as such and a lubricant.

    Never Seez® Lubricating Compounds
    Never Seez® Regular Grade Anti-Seize

    The "original" anti-seize compound and extreme pressure lubricant formulated with copper, graphite, aluminum and other ingredients to protect metal parts against rust, corrosion and seizure up to 1800°F.

    We deal with this in the oil and gas industry. We have to set our torque guns differently for a anti-siezed bolt or a new bolt with tool oil. When you have a dirty rusty bolt that changes everything and you never get it to proper torque.
    Ignorance is not Bliss, it's insanity

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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    I have used anti-sieze on my lugnuts for 25 years. Torque by hand to standard specs. No issues except for when a garage used an impact to tighten and torque and my lug nuts broke off 80 miles down the road. Most of the idiots working at tire places these days do not even know how to read a torque wrench. That torques me off.....pun intended!@ Of course - doing the wrong thing for 25 years doesn't make it right. I don't put new anti-sieze on - just a one time application for me per vehicle usually.

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    There are dozens of different "anti-seize" products, and not all are compatible with dissimilar metals and saltwater.

    Best stuff I've found is the nickel-based product from loctite - the nickel is more noble than stainless and won't cause any galvanic problems with stainless fasteners threaded into aluminum. It also helps 304 and 316 stainless nuts from galling and sticking on bolts of the same material.

    For lugnuts on vehicles and trailers, a one-time application is usually enough. Buying and using a good torque wrench is mandatory. On a bare nut, a lot of torque you put in is eaten up by dry metal-on-metal contact between the nut and the joined part.

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    Quote Originally Posted by alaskabliss View Post
    Actually anti-sieze acts as a lubricant. It changes the friction coeffiecency when torqing up.

    A dry bolt has a friction coefficent of .8 and lubricated is .15. The original antiseize was listed as such and a lubricant.

    Never Seez® Lubricating Compounds
    Never Seez® Regular Grade Anti-Seize

    The "original" anti-seize compound and extreme pressure lubricant formulated with copper, graphite, aluminum and other ingredients to protect metal parts against rust, corrosion and seizure up to 1800°F.

    We deal with this in the oil and gas industry. We have to set our torque guns differently for a anti-siezed bolt or a new bolt with tool oil. When you have a dirty rusty bolt that changes everything and you never get it to proper torque.
    Yes, that I understand and agree with, so I will clarify my previous post.

    Anti-sieze should never be used as a lubricant when repetitive motion and pressure exist between the parts coated with the product.

    Example;

    As a mechanic for more than 22 years I have seen some ridiculous things take place, one of them in particular and directly related I discovered when replacing a clutch in an SUV. Whoever had installed the clutch I was replacing had applied anti-sieze to the release bearing sleeve and the bearing retainer, a place that should have had only a light application of grease. What occured was accelerated wear and premature failure due a product (anti-sieze) that was not suited for that purpose. I had to replace the front half of the transmission housing instead of a new bearing retainer (as what is typical), for the manufacturer in their infinte wisdom (read CHEAP) felt it was uneccessary to produce the part separtely from the housing, all because someone used a product in a place for which it was not intended. It was unanticipated additional $$$ for the owner of the vehicle.

    My point: one should be sure of a product and its' intended use's before using any product or the unintedned consequences may be very costly.

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