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Thread: Kasilof Reds?

  1. #1
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    Default Kasilof Reds?

    How have the reds been at the Kasilof? Went down last week and people said it had been really slow. Tossing back and fourth going to the Russian or Crooked Creek for reds. Any advice?

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    Go to the Russian. Fish are there, no point in hoping fishing has drastically improved on the kasilof IMO.

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    6,000 a day over the counter... Get your tide book out they will come in with tide...

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    Quote Originally Posted by 323 View Post
    6,000 a day over the counter... Get your tide book out they will come in with tide...
    Okay. I've heard 30 minutes to 2 hours after high tide. Is this a good time frame to fish?

    Does the tide matter for the Russian since it's so far up?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Eatsleepfish View Post
    Okay. I've heard 30 minutes to 2 hours after high tide. Is this a good time frame to fish?

    Does the tide matter for the Russian since it's so far up?
    No pro on the kasilof but the counter is not very far from the mouth of the river, but i would be there before high tide and hang out and go from there.... So hopefully someone who fishes the kasilof a lot will chime in.. The Russian is not dependent at all on the tide the fish being caught on the upper Kenai and Russian have been in the river for awhile, at least a week anyhow, maybe less.

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    The counter is upstream of the highway. According to the ADFG it takes 12-36 hours for the fish to cross the counter after entering the river. If you're trying to fish the tides go down to the day use a couple miles downstream of the highway.

    "The Kasilof River sockeye salmon sonar project is located approximately 8 river miles upstream from the river mouth, just upstream of the Sterling Highway bridge. Sockeye salmon travel time to this site from Cook Inlet ranges from approximately 12-hours to 36-hours"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Barbo View Post
    The counter is upstream of the highway. According to the ADFG it takes 12-36 hours for the fish to cross the counter after entering the river. If you're trying to fish the tides go down to the day use a couple miles downstream of the highway.

    "The Kasilof River sockeye salmon sonar project is located approximately 8 river miles upstream from the river mouth, just upstream of the Sterling Highway bridge. Sockeye salmon travel time to this site from Cook Inlet ranges from approximately 12-hours to 36-hours"
    What is the day use? Are you talking about Crooked Creek?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Eatsleepfish View Post
    What is the day use? Are you talking about Crooked Creek?
    I think thats what he is referring too but I find the fishing a little more enjoyable above the bridge. There is a trail that goes 1/4 to 1/2 mile through the woods and drops out at the bend you can see from the boat launch. There is much more room and a lot less people. The fish wont be any different up there than they are in the lower portion. If they're in you'll get em if not you'll get exercise.
    Makin fur fins and feathers fly.

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