Results 1 to 20 of 20

Thread: Paking out Game

  1. #1
    New member
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    9

    Default Paking out Game

    Hello all, I am looking for any information on a good pack system that will facilitate packing out game once harvested. I am used to carrying insanely heavy loads but game is new to me. I am looking at eberlestock packs but they never mention carrying game out, only what you can pack during the hunt. Looking for any and all recommendations. Thanks for the nod.

  2. #2

    Default

    Some of this depends on how you are going to be packing the game, and that can depend on the specific hunt you are going to do. Are you packing out game meat still on the bone (quartered and such) or having the meat deboned? Some hunts require the meat to be left on the bone, so you will want to make sure you have a pack that you can strip down to just the external frame (remove the bag or not have a bag to start with). You want a frame that provides plenty of tie-down points for cord so you can fit odd-shaped/sized pieces. If you have boned out meat, you can put that in the bag of a more standard pack, but you will want to look for something with a good main bag size if you are going to go that way. Lots of pockets don't do you any good for meat hauling

  3. #3

    Default

    You mention Eberlestock so I will chime in here. anchskier makes great points as the type of hunt and the game animal will make a difference. As far as packs, I recently got the Eberlestock X2 and really like it as a daily hunting pack. Mostly, I like the way it expands to the point where I can make the first trip out with most of my gear and still a large quarter or a good load of deboned meat. From there I would grab a frame pack to haul the rest of the meat and gear out.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    107

    Default

    Check out this thread.
    http://forums.bowsite.com/TF/bgforum...es=156&forum=5

    It is by elk hunters. They are very concerned about weight and need to haul elk for many miles through the mountains.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    107

    Default

    I really love my Eberlestock X2. It is a great day pack. It has plenty of space for snacks, survival gear, rain gear, etc.

    It also has space to haul meat. Here is a shot with the front quarter of a moose.
    Attachment 71380

  6. #6

    Default

    I have a Kifaru Timberline that I love. Lightweight, huge capacity, great load distribution. I packed a 5-foot black bear in it this spring... without cutting the bear up first.
    Jason
    http://www.troutnut.com -- Fly fishing photos & insect hatch encyclopedia.
    http://www.daltoncorridormap.com -- Exact 5-mile Haul Road corridor boundary for GPS & Google Earth

  7. #7
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    13,391

    Default

    If you're willing to drop the coin, it's really hard to beat the Barney's line of packs. There is a reason why the majority of the guides in the state use one - they are designed to handle serious weight.


  8. #8
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    5,765

    Default

    You might have a look at our page on Meat Care Tools. It contains a video review where we discuss packs for packing out game meat. The short version of a longer story is that the discussion of packs, like rifles and other gear, is often clouded by the passion of the advocate of a particular brand. I am not exception, however in my defense of Barney's Moose Pack I offer the fact that this pack is the top choice used by most hunting guides in Alaska. Especially those who have been at this game for a long time.

    Another aspect to consider when you read the recommendations of other hunters is that you have no way of knowing how experienced the hunter is with his pack. Are you talking to someone who guided on Kodiak for forty years, or a 14-year-old kid on his third hunt? The nice thing about an open venue like this one is that everyone has a voice. The problem with it is that we all have an equal voice. So you really should dig into this in order to get some perspective from a variety of sources.

    I would steer clear of internal frame packs in general, because they are not large enough for large quarters such as those on moose or bison. I have some good friends who use internal frame packs exclusively for sheep hunting, but they have confided that those bags are totally inadequate for moose or other larger game. You might be able to get a smaller bear hide in one, but if you shoot a larger bear, good luck in getting the hide in the bag, let alone any meat you might salvage.

    I see some pack recommendations in this thread, where the poster indicates that the pack they are recommending is not adequate for larger loads, particularly loads where the bones are left in the quarters. My recommendation, unless you plan to own multiple packs for different situations, is to simply find one pack that will do it all comfortably. The Barney's Pack, mentioned earlier, is just such a pack. I have said many times that the largest quarter I carried in mine, that I actually weighed on a scale, was a 165# hindquarter from a larger bull moose. I am certain I have carried heavier loads, but did not have a chance to weigh them on a scale. I can say that I have personally packed out entire caribou and sheep, bones and all, in this pack, in one load. Those loads included all four quarters and ribs on the bone, plus backstraps and tenderloins, the neck and brisket, and trim meat, plus the cape and headgear. In other words, everything except the backbone, viscera, lower legs and back half of the hide. I have also carried bulky loads of firewood into camp, I have backpacked 14' self-bailing round rafts, raft frames, outboard motors, fuel tanks and many, many other loads of a heavy or bulky nature with this pack. I have two of them, and one is nearly 20 years old and I have never had a failure of a seam, a frame, a buckle or any other part on my pack.

    People often complain of the price of this pack, yet they think nothing of spending the same amount over the years on multiple packs that eventually fail and have to be replaced. Certainly other packs will get the job done. I packed out my first moose on a Coleman Peak 1 frame; a plastic frame that literally wrapped itself around the quarter when I lashed it on. So it can be done, but in the end it's a question of comfort, safety, durability and capacity.

    I have some other video footage I will try to put out there on backpacks, which reviews some other styles. Perhaps it will be of some use.

    See? I told you this was an opinion-charged topic! And I warned you that I am no exception, so take it for what it's worth-

    Best regards,

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  9. #9
    Member alaska_pike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    big lake
    Posts
    320

    Default

    the standard kelty pack frame there at sportsmans works real good,.. $120. very comfortable hauling out moose quarters and you can use a dry bag with it for your gear. also works well for large bags of deboned meat. plenty of tie down points to keep those bulky loads from shifting during your pack out.

  10. #10
    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Mat-Su
    Posts
    2,150

    Default

    Dont want to start an arguement, but I have packed moose with a standard CampTrails/Kelty freighter frames and also with a Barney frame. The suspension system on the Barneys is so much better than the others, that its not really even worth comparing.

    If I was going to pack out one moose a year guaranteed to be less than a mile, I might be able to justify the cheaper frames.

  11. #11
    Member TWB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    3,573

    Default

    If it's a Barney's you want, I have a Hunter in Kevlar, mint shape. Wanting a bigger pack.
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    2,919

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Strahan View Post
    You might have a look at our page on Meat Care Tools. It contains a video review where we discuss packs for packing out game meat. The short version of a longer story is that the discussion of packs, like rifles and other gear, is often clouded by the passion of the advocate of a particular brand. I am not exception, however in my defense of Barney's Moose Pack I offer the fact that this pack is the top choice used by most hunting guides in Alaska. Especially those who have been at this game for a long time.

    Another aspect to consider when you read the recommendations of other hunters is that you have no way of knowing how experienced the hunter is with his pack. Are you talking to someone who guided on Kodiak for forty years, or a 14-year-old kid on his third hunt? The nice thing about an open venue like this one is that everyone has a voice. The problem with it is that we all have an equal voice. So you really should dig into this in order to get some perspective from a variety of sources.
    Lots of truths in Strahans statements above. The forum is full of studs and duds and a lot of duds who claim to be or have been studs.. I say as Mike alluded to that is don't look to a persons advice but an industry's ... The guiding industry.. By an extremely large margin the top pack in any camp for guide or packer is a Barney's pack. Spendy up front but leaps and bounds above the rest and at its best when hauling insane loads..

  13. #13
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    5,765

    Default

    This is what you get when you buy junk.



    It won't generally fail out in the gear shed, but when you're using it.

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  14. #14
    Member SLA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    120

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TWB View Post
    If it's a Barney's you want, I have a Hunter in Kevlar, mint shape. Wanting a bigger pack.
    pm sent, looking for something for my oct goat hunt.

  15. #15
    Member icb12's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Kenai
    Posts
    1,038

    Default

    Mystery Ranch.

    Go here: http://www.mysteryranch.com/

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Homeless Fisherman
    Posts
    22

    Default

    ++++ for mystery ranch. Insane pack

  17. #17
    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    4,670

    Default

    Love my Mystery Ranch pack but wish they would put one model on a diet so I could have a lighter pack.

  18. #18
    Member icb12's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Kenai
    Posts
    1,038

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by broncoformudv View Post
    Love my Mystery Ranch pack but wish they would put one model on a diet so I could have a lighter pack.
    Try the new pack for the nice frame. The metcalf.

    Sweet Pack; I've got one if you're ever in the Kenai area and want to check it out.

    I've got 4 MR packs. A snapdragon, a Crewcab, a 6500, and the metcalf. This ski season will probably see a blackjack in my hands unless it is as bad as last season.

    Snapdragon is everyday pack. Goes to work everyday. I fish in it, hike in it, scout in it, single nighter in it, travel with it. Killer pack.
    Crewcab is the ultimate day hunter; but IMO it lacks the convenience for multiday trips. It will hold it and carry it well; just not as conveniently as another pack.
    6500- Multi day pack. carry whatever you want, wherever you want, as far as you want.
    metcalf. New to me, but I see it fulfilling a role I filled with a terrible cheap pack from REI. Going in Light for 2-5 days, It's got space, it's convenient, it's Light(er). For ME this will be more of my "backpacking" pack. I want to rally resurrection, or hit kesugi, or maybe do an overnighter with hunting gear.

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Homeless Fisherman
    Posts
    22

    Default

    I have the MR Kodiak. I have yet to put it through its paces on the mountain but 140 lbs in it on the treadmill feels like your carrying 50. It is built like a monster.

  20. #20
    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    4,670

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by icb12 View Post
    Try the new pack for the nice frame. The metcalf.

    Sweet Pack; I've got one if you're ever in the Kenai area and want to check it out.

    I've got 4 MR packs. A snapdragon, a Crewcab, a 6500, and the metcalf. This ski season will probably see a blackjack in my hands unless it is as bad as last season.

    Snapdragon is everyday pack. Goes to work everyday. I fish in it, hike in it, scout in it, single nighter in it, travel with it. Killer pack.
    Crewcab is the ultimate day hunter; but IMO it lacks the convenience for multiday trips. It will hold it and carry it well; just not as conveniently as another pack.
    6500- Multi day pack. carry whatever you want, wherever you want, as far as you want.
    metcalf. New to me, but I see it fulfilling a role I filled with a terrible cheap pack from REI. Going in Light for 2-5 days, It's got space, it's convenient, it's Light(er). For ME this will be more of my "backpacking" pack. I want to rally resurrection, or hit kesugi, or maybe do an overnighter with hunting gear.
    I will have to look into the METCALF, sounds interesting. I currently have two 6500's and love them aside from how much they weigh.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •