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Thread: Moose pelvis - gutless field dressing

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    Default Moose pelvis - gutless field dressing

    I've used this method for many deer. It works great.
    http://elk101.com/videos/gutless-video/

    It looks similar to the method recommended in AKDFG video.

    On one moose hunt, we separated the pelvis from the spint and split the pelvis in half with an axe. Each leg still contained half the pelvis bone. The theory was that we'd lose less meat if we made fewer knife cuts.

    What do most Alaskan moose hunters do?

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    This is what I do with the moose that we shoot too with a couple of exceptions. I don't open the body cavity until I'm done with both sides to remove the tenderloins. By Alaska law you mustsalvage the meat of the ribs. To me this means filleting the meat off the top of the ribs as they have done and also the strip of meat between the rib bones leaving a skeleton appearance when you are done. I also have gotten into the habit of taking a couple of digital pictures of the carcass when I am all done to show to a trooper if they want to see the meat. They are welcome to paw through the game bags to look for all of the meat but with the bags and the pictures this alleviates all doubt as to how good of a job that I've done in the butchering process.

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    Default Tenderloin recovery

    I'm not afraid to admit I've sliced a gut bag open before while trying to get a tenderloin, is there a special blade or special technique you all are using to remove tenderloins on big game. I usually get them out through the back right above the pelvis but the gut bag seems to be tight up against them. Maybe I just don't got the swag.

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    Quote Originally Posted by iyouktug View Post
    I'm not afraid to admit I've sliced a gut bag open before while trying to get a tenderloin, is there a special blade or special technique you all are using to remove tenderloins on big game. I usually get them out through the back right above the pelvis but the gut bag seems to be tight up against them. Maybe I just don't got the swag.
    After I get everything done and off the carcass I will use a Wyoming knife or be real careful with a pointed knife and I will cut the membrane holding the guts in. I cut following the ribs to the back bone then follow the backbone to the pelvis basicly opening it up so the guts can come out then grab the pelvis and pull it away from the guts and it opens it up nicely to get at the tenders. I hope that made sense.

    Sent while hiding from the boss

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    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Question #1: Dealing with the pelvis. If you're packing that moose meat very far, you're gonna want to leave the whole pelvis at the kill site. We always fillet the meat right off of it when we pull the hind quarters. When we are all done with the carcass, we go back over it and trim out all the scraps off the spine and pelvis and toss those in the burger bag.

    Question #2: The tenderloins. We remove them by opening the abdominal cavity until the contents subside out of the animal. This exposes both tenderloins so you have excellent access to them without having to worry about perforating the stomach or intestines. We open the cavity by making an incision along the trailing edge of the last rib, and along the spine, making an "L-shaped" flap of the flank meat, which can be pushed out of the way to allow the stomach and intestines to flow out of the carcass. I try not to pull too much on the paunch because it's easy to tear something and then you have a mess on your hands (literally).

    -Mike
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Strahan View Post
    Question #1: Dealing with the pelvis. If you're packing that moose meat very far, you're gonna want to leave the whole pelvis at the kill site. We always fillet the meat right off of it when we pull the hind quarters. When we are all done with the carcass, we go back over it and trim out all the scraps off the spine and pelvis and toss those in the burger bag.

    Question #2: The tenderloins. We remove them by opening the abdominal cavity until the contents subside out of the animal. This exposes both tenderloins so you have excellent access to them without having to worry about perforating the stomach or intestines. We open the cavity by making an incision along the trailing edge of the last rib, and along the spine, making an "L-shaped" flap of the flank meat, which can be pushed out of the way to allow the stomach and intestines to flow out of the carcass. I try not to pull too much on the paunch because it's easy to tear something and then you have a mess on your hands (literally).

    -Mike
    I do the same thing, making sure that tenderloin recovery is the last meat to get and use my hand and fingers as much as my knife as the meat is so tender that it can be pulled away by hand with just a few cuts.


    The guts spilled after we were done and were removing the antlers.

    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"

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    How many folks leave the spine in tact? We were pretty far back with a1.2 mile hike to the river from the kill site. Still... the guys I was with kept the entire spine in tact from the pelvis to the neck. They didn't want to waste any meat.

    We did have top cut the spine in thirds to be able to carry it.

    We then filleted all the meat of the bone once we got home.

    It did probably waste less meat. But it was a lot more work.

    Do many Alaskan folks do this?

    Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk 2

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    Quote Originally Posted by mad_angler View Post
    How many folks leave the spine in tact? We were pretty far back with a1.2 mile hike to the river from the kill site. Still... the guys I was with kept the entire spine in tact from the pelvis to the neck. They didn't want to waste any meat.

    We did have top cut the spine in thirds to be able to carry it.

    We then filleted all the meat of the bone once we got home.

    It did probably waste less meat. But it was a lot more work.

    Do many Alaskan folks do this?

    Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk 2
    It's been my observation that folks living in the villages almost always leave the spine intact, leave the hide on the quarters and leave the pelvis attached. Most nonlocal hunters leave the spine and pelvis at the kill site, and remove the hide from the quarters. There are exceptions, but that has been my observation in the field.

    If you are diligent (and you should be), you can clean that spine and pelvis up pretty well at the kill site. The goal is to leave so little meat at the kill site that the wolves give you a dirty look.

    -Mike
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    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    I do the same thing, making sure that tenderloin recovery is the last meat to get and use my hand and fingers as much as my knife as the meat is so tender that it can be pulled away by hand with just a few cuts.


    The guts spilled after we were done and were removing the antlers.

    Hey, what are those black tires I see in the upper part of the photo, hmmm???

    Hmmm...
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    Quote Originally Posted by mad_angler View Post
    How many folks leave the spine in tact? We were pretty far back with a1.2 mile hike to the river from the kill site. Still... the guys I was with kept the entire spine in tact from the pelvis to the neck. They didn't want to waste any meat.

    We did have top cut the spine in thirds to be able to carry it.

    We then filleted all the meat of the bone once we got home.

    It did probably waste less meat. But it was a lot more work.

    Do many Alaskan folks do this?

    Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk 2
    In our younger days, and when I had two husky teenagers eating at my table, we'd pack the backbone intact home to clean it up.. Now I remove the meat from the backbone and leave the bare bone for the varmits. The 1st couple moose I ever harvested I left the rib cages on the carcass.. Then one year my best friend flew up and we went hunting. Ralph owned 2 or 3 general country stores and did most all of his own butchering. I started to strip the meat from the ribs when he told me to leave the ribs alone, and that we'd salvage the ribs.. When we finished with the hunt and returned home he cooked up a mess of ribs in a big crock pot that convinced me we had wasted a lot of good eating up to this point.. So for the last xx yrs, we always saw the rib cages out (Moose and caribou), at home we saw them up into crock pot sized portions..

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Strahan View Post
    Hey, what are those black tires I see in the upper part of the photo, hmmm???

    Hmmm...
    Looks like the faster & easier way to pack a moose!
    "Grin and Bear It"

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    I have a little different method of butchering that works well for us. The ribs are some of our favorite meals and it pains me whenever I see the meat stripped off. I split the backbone down the middle with a hand saw and bring it out that way. Small moose come out in 4 pieces - larger ones take a few more pieces but everything comes out on the bone. It is hard to have a good T-bone steak without the bones as well.

    Step 1 - ASAP - Head off - guts out & cooling begins


    Step 2 - Cut in Half


    Step 3 - Cut each half in 1/2 again & remove lower portion of legs


    Step 4 - Hang it


    Step 5 - Skin it



    Step 6 - Bag it


    Step 7 - Butcher and Eat it


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    rambling raven, I like your butchering method.
    "Grin and Bear It"

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    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Raven,

    Meat looks really clean! And the steaks... looks like you cut them frozen with a bandsaw?

    Don't forget, most areas now require evidence of sex to be left naturally attached to one hindquarter. These pics were probably taken before that regulation started.

    Nice job!

    -Mike
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    Maybe the evidence is hanging there, but you just can't see it in the pics...
    "Grin and Bear It"

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    With CWD floating around down here, we do not cut the spine and leave it in the field. Most states do not allow interstate transportation of the spine and skull with any brain matter. Hopefully it stays out of Alaska!

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    Mike,
    Thanks we are fanatics about our moose meat.
    I do have a band saw - clean and slightly freeze the portions to cut, we have bone in steaks, bone in roasts, short ribs, colby ribs, dog bones, etc..

    Actually those pictures were from a couple rather recent moose. Not sure why you assumed there wasn't evidence of sex attached, surely you know where to find that part on a moose (hint - it is in a place not shown in the pictures)

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Strahan View Post
    Raven,

    Meat looks really clean! And the steaks... looks like you cut them frozen with a bandsaw?

    Don't forget, most areas now require evidence of sex to be left naturally attached to one hindquarter. These pics were probably taken before that regulation started.

    Nice job!

    -Mike

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    1. Open throat to bleed out.
    2. Cut rear legs to joint to splay out, this balances the animal while on the back.
    3. Skin legs, arms, neck down to the ground on both sides.
    4. Remove front arms at joint.
    5. Open neck to anus, remove breastbone using a knife point.
    6. Roll to side and remove guts, pull out of way. Save liver, and heart.
    7. Unzip ribcage from backbone. Remove rear legs at joint.
    8. Roll over and remove other side ribcage, lift backbone and finish removing skin.
    9. Remove rear hips with knifepoint where they join the spine, separate spine into a couple sections.
    10. Get it to the boat, have coffee.

    We leave only the skin, head (if we don't want it), feet and guts. Everything else goes out.
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    Quote Originally Posted by rambling raven View Post
    Mike,
    Thanks we are fanatics about our moose meat.
    I do have a band saw - clean and slightly freeze the portions to cut, we have bone in steaks, bone in roasts, short ribs, colby ribs, dog bones, etc..

    Actually those pictures were from a couple rather recent moose. Not sure why you assumed there wasn't evidence of sex attached, surely you know where to find that part on a moose (hint - it is in a place not shown in the pictures)
    Sorry if I came across that way... I saw it in one of the photos but it looked like it was all being removed, and I could not see it in the other pics. Not accusing anyone, just using the opportunity to remind some of the newer folks about that restriction. I work with a lot of hunters and some are not aware of the requirement.

    No harm intended.

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
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    I like those bone in bandsaw steaks rambling raven, I can see you take pride in your meat care, I need to get a system like that down, looks like every bit of that moose went to good use.

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